RSS
 

Posts Tagged ‘Airport’

Camera battery explosion causes chaos at Orlando International Airport

14 Nov
Photo by Ashim D’Silva

An exploding lithium-ion camera battery caused a panic at the Orlando International Airport on Friday, resulting in 24 flight cancellations as well as temporary chaos as a terminal was evacuated. Witnesses say the exploding battery made a sound similar to a gunshot, prompting people to flee the area.

Though frightening, the situation proved mostly harmless as officials discovered the source of the sound: a camera battery that had exploded inside of a traveler’s bag, which began smoking as a result. Orlando Police have since posted tweets advising the public that no shots were fired in the airport, but instead that “a lithium battery in a camera exploded in a bag … the bag was smoldering.” No one was hurt in the incident.

The incident follows a recent recommendation by the FAA that airlines ban passengers from checking devices with lithium-ion batteries in bags due to their volatility and the fire risk they pose, instead suggesting they pack them in their carry-on luggage.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Camera battery explosion causes chaos at Orlando International Airport

Posted in Uncategorized

 

This animation shows the chaos a drone caused at a London airport

03 Nov

The sequence of diversions and re-routing caused when a drone was sighted close to one of London’s busiest airports has been turned into an amazing animated map by the UK’s National Air Traffic Service (NATS), to demonstrate the level of disruption even short airport closures can create.

The video map shows what happens to normal air traffic at Gatwick airport when the runway was closed in response to a drone in the vicinity. The closure lasted only nine minutes, but in that time two holding areas away from the airport became congested and some aircraft had to divert to alternative airports over fuel concerns.

The incident happened on a Sunday during the summer when the airport was particularly busy with summer holiday traffic. A drone was spotted close to the runway, but seemed to disappear before returning when the runway reopened, causing it to be closed again for another five minutes. In total, the runway was only closed for 14 minutes, but the level of disruption is easy to see on the map as aircraft circle and shift into safer holding areas with other planes waiting to use the airport.

In all, four holding areas had to be used, and four planes needed to land at different airports because it wasn’t clear how long the closure would last.

“The disruption was significant and took hours to clear; it was around midnight before everything was fully ‘back to normal’ and even then, hundreds of passengers had ended up away from their intended airport and thousands of passengers had been delayed,” reports the NATS blog. “All as a result of one drone pilot flouting the rules. “

NATS encourages all drone pilots to read the Civil Aviation Authorities’ Drone Code and to download the Drone Assist app to ensure they fly safely.

You can find out more about the incident and air traffic control on the NATS website.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on This animation shows the chaos a drone caused at a London airport

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Think Tank Airport Helipak for 3DR Solo drone and Airport Advantage bags now available

17 Sep

Think Tank has a new rolling camera bag and a drone backpack for traveling, the Airport Advantage and Airport Helipak for 3DR Solo. The Airport Advantage bag is designed for safely transporting cameras and lenses, while the Helipak model is designed to transport the 3DR Solo drone, a 15-inch laptop, and related drone accessories including the controller.

The Airport Advantage bag meets both international and US airline carry-on requirements, according to Think Tank, weighing in at 5.8lbs / 2.7kg with 2.7 W x 19.5 H x 7.3in D / 32.3 x 49.5 x 18.5cm external dimensions. This rolling bag can accommodate various camera and lens arrangements, such as two gripped DSLRs with lenses and three or four additional lenses, a pair of mirrorless camera bodies with ‘lots of lenses,’ or a standard DSLR with attached lens alongside three or four other lenses, a 15-inch laptop, and a gripped DSLR with an attached lens.

The Airport Helipak, meanwhile, is a soft-bodied backpack with a dedicated pocket for a 15-inch laptop, plus a custom divider that enables the wearer to reconfigure the bag’s space to accommodate other gear. According to Think Tank, the bag can hold the laptop, 3DR Solo drone and its controller, a charger and spare rotors, extra batteries, tools, GoPro cameras, a jacket and other items. The backpack weighs 4.6lbs / 2.1kg and has 14 W x 20.5 H x 9in D / 35.6 × 52.1 × 22.9cm external dimensions.

Both the Airport Advantage and the Airport Helipak for 3DR Solo are available now for $ 249.75 and $ 199.75.

Via: Think Tank (1), (2)

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Think Tank Airport Helipak for 3DR Solo drone and Airport Advantage bags now available

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Review – The ThinkTank Photo Airport Roller Derby Bag

24 Jul

For those who know me, they know that I have a slight obsession with camera bags. There are just so many varieties; roller bags, backpacks, shoulder bags, etc., so it gets a little hard to get bored of them!

IMG_4880

Recently though, I’ve been using a ThinkTank Photo Roller Derby bag as my everyday roller. Now, using a roller bag may not be ideal for everyone. But for people like me who need to transport a lot of kit, they are lifesavers! This isn’t the only roller bag I have, though. I also have a ThinkTank Airport Security V2.0 which is absolutely fantastic, too.

But why did I jump to a slightly smaller bag? The answer to that is simple: the ThinkTank Photo Airport Roller Derby bag has four wheels, whereas the Airport Security only has two. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but it makes moving the bag around that much easier.

So before we begin the review, let’s take a look at the Roller Derby’s features as from the ThinkTank website:

OVERVIEW

Materials: Exterior

  • 3D air mesh
  • 3-ply bonded nylon thread
  • Polyurethane coating
  • 1680D ballistic nylon
  • 420D velocity nylon
  • Durable water-repellant (DWR) coating
  • YKK® RC Fuse (abrasion-resistant) zippers
  • Custom-designed, replaceable wheels with sealed steel bearings
  • Rubberized laminate reinforcement

Materials: Interior

airport-roller-derby-5-750

Image courtesy ThinkTank

  • 210D silver-toned nylon
  • Polyurethane backed velex liner & dividers
  • 2x polyurethane coated nylon 210T seam-sealed rain cover
  • Closed cell foam & PE board reinforced dividers
  • Belly-O mesh pockets
  • 3-ply bonded nylon thread

Specifications:

  • Internal Dimensions: 12.6” W x 18.5” H x 5.5–7.5” D (32 × 47 × 14–19 cm)
  • Exterior Dimensions: 14” W x 22” H x 9.0” D (35.6 × 55.9 × 22.9 cm)
  • Tablet Compartment: 10.5” W x 10.3” H x 0.6” D (26.7 x 26.1 x 1.5 cm)
  • Laptop Compartment: 10.5” W x 14.5” H x 1.0” D (26.7 x 36.8 x 2.5 cm)
  • Weight: 9.5–11.5 lbs (4.3–5.2 kg) depending on accessories used.

Additional Features:

Cable Lock

  • Lock & cable to secure lockable zippers and tether the bag
  • airport-roller-derby-9-6003-ways to roll: upright at your side, back wheel tilt, or side wheel tilt
  • Seam-sealed rain cover included
  • Bottom handle for easy over head lifting
  • Tripod mount and water bottle pocket on side
  • 2-position locking handle extends to 39–42” for better ergonomics when pushing
  • Interior zippered pockets for batteries, CF cards, filters and accessories
  • Top zippered pocket for wallet or cell phone
  • Rapid access side pocket for travel essentials
  • Reinforced back panel for increased durability
  • User replaceable wheels
  • Seam sealed rain cover included
Image courtesy ThinkTank

Image courtesy ThinkTank

BUILD QUALITY

If you have used ThinkTank products in the past, you are most likely already familiar with the overall quality of their products. The ThinkTank Photo Airport Roller Derby bag is no exception. I have been using this bag almost everyday for the last eight weeks. It has been dragged through mud, wet grass, over gravel, been pulled in and out of my car, and been shoved around on public transport. Through all of this, not once have I had any issues with any of the wheels (they just keep going, no matter what!), and most importantly, my equipment has come out of it completely unharmed.

Wheel:wear.2

Wheels showing wear but mostly just scratches.

It’s been dragged a bit over concrete and other hard surfaces, and other than a few little scuff marks on its exterior, it’s perfectly fine and shows no sign of giving up any time soon. The telescopic handle feels more sturdy than the one on my other roller, and is easily pulled up and down for use. Most bags’ weakness appears first with the zippers; especially if you’re packing a lot of kit into the bag. However, the zippers used on this bag are no different to that of any other ThinkTank product. The zippers are easily opened and closed no matter how much equipment is packed in. In fact, I’ve yet to see any of the zippers across all my bags (yes, I have a few!) even begin to show any sign of strain.

Lockable Zipper

At the base of the bag, extending up the back a little way, is a tougher nylon cover which is perfect for protecting the material of the bag as you pull along; such as when going down stairs or whatnot. Internally, the bag is no really different to any other ThinkTank bag. The removable inserts provide ample protection for all of my kit. The rollers on the bag have also proven to be very durable. I’ve taken my bag through puddles, mud, wet grass, gravel – you name it – and all without a single problem.

What really helps the wheels is that there are actually eight wheels in total; two wheels on each castor. This helps spread the weight of the bag and its contents out more effectively, thereby reducing the strain on each individual wheel.

airport-roller-derby-6-750

Image courtesy ThinkTank

Wheels

DESIGN

The design of the Roller Derby is very well thought out. The main camera compartment is easily accessible. The opening hinges across the bag, not up/down. This does make it easier to work with in smaller spaces, or out of the trunk of your car, as you don’t need much space to open it.

On the inside of the opening are three compartments where you can put extra items like memory cards, cleaning tools etc. On the front of the bag you’ll find there’s also a handy compartment to fit your laptop/tablet and other little bits and bobs too.

Image courtesy ThinkTank

Image courtesy ThinkTank

If you need to leave your bag unattended, ThinkTank has you covered there, too. They have provided a cable, which is attached to the bag, and a lock which will enable you to lock the bag to an object so it’s more secure. The zippers to the main camera compartment are also lockable, so all your kit is safe; this is also perfect for air travel or public transport, for that little extra peace of mind.

The bag also ships with a rain cover which, I might add, is one of the easiest rain covers to put on bag! It covers the bag nicely and gives your equipment that extra level of protection from the elements.

Rain cover on

Image courtesy ThinkTank

Image courtesy ThinkTank

IN USE

This has now become my go-to bag for day-to-day use. It’s smaller than my other roller bag, which makes it easier for fitting in to cars, on trains, etc., and is also easier to fit under a table in a media room. The four castor design makes it easier to put the bag under a table, and take it out again; without having to move myself about to maneuverer it. I can just simply push it under, or grab it out.

Boot

Here it is in the trunk (boot) of my car.

I’ve found the compact design of the bag to be very helpful when working in tighter spaces (some of the media rooms here in the UK are very ah….cozy!) as it doesn’t get in the way when I am unpacking my kit from it. Yet, despite its compact nature I can still fit my everyday required kit.

In this bag I can fit:

  • Two EOS 1-D series cameras
  • A 400mm f/2.8 lens
  • A 70-200 f/2.8 lens
  • A 16-35 f/2.8 lens
  • A 1.4x Teleconverter
  • Two 600-EX RT Canon Speedlites
  • Other little bits and pieces

IMG_4882

CONCLUSION

I love roller bags, they work perfectly for my requirements. For me, this bag is a winner. It’s compact design, yet high carrying capacity, make this bag ideal for people who want to carry larger amounts of equipment easily. Here are my thoughts:

Who is this bag for:

This bag is ideal for people who want a bag that they don’t have to carry around. The wheels make transporting equipment so much easier. It’s particularly ideal for travel on public transport, as its compact design will easily fit in the luggage area of many trains, or next to you on the seat.

Who is this bag NOT for: 

If you’re someone who needs to travel with a bag with them all the times, you may want to look outside roller bags. If you want to carry more equipment, this particular model may be a little too small as well.

Pros:

Empty, the bag is quite light for a roller bag, weighing in at 5kg (11 pounds). Its compact design makes it easier to store when you’re in transit and at home, and the wheels make it a lot easier to move around. A well thought out design makes the most of its compact size to fit a generous amount of kit inside.

Media

Cons:

I wouldn’t say this is necessarily a con; rather just something to be aware of, but the 4-wheel design can mean the bag can tend to roll away if it’s left on a slope, so be careful of this! When using a large lens (such as a 400mm f/2.8 or 600mm f/4, etc.) with the hood on, you are no longer able to put a laptop in the laptop compartment in the front of the bag. The price may be a con for some if you’re not in the market for a bag that’s almost $ 400.

If you’re on the market for a good quality, durable, and ergonomic roller bag, I would strongly suggest you take a look at the ThinkTank Photo Airport Roller Derby!

googletag.cmd.push(function() {
tablet_slots.push( googletag.defineSlot( “/1005424/_dPSv4_tab-all-article-bottom_(300×250)”, [300, 250], “pb-ad-78623” ).addService( googletag.pubads() ) ); } );

googletag.cmd.push(function() {
mobile_slots.push( googletag.defineSlot( “/1005424/_dPSv4_mob-all-article-bottom_(300×250)”, [300, 250], “pb-ad-78158” ).addService( googletag.pubads() ) ); } );

The post Review – The ThinkTank Photo Airport Roller Derby Bag by Daniel Smith appeared first on Digital Photography School.


Digital Photography School

 
Comments Off on Review – The ThinkTank Photo Airport Roller Derby Bag

Posted in Photography

 

Commuter Olympics: Indoor Running Tracks Link Japanese Airport

13 Apr

[ By WebUrbanist in Design & Guerilla Ads & Marketing. ]

japanese airport terminal tracks

Combining a novel form of wayfinding with a nod to the upcoming 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, this new airport terminal trades moving walkways for a color-coded circuit of racetrack paths.

japan indoor running track

japan domestic international terminal

The airport extension to Narita International anticipates the additional capacity needed in a few years for the upcoming event but also reflects a limited budget for expansion, together driving a design that needs no illuminated signs and skips people-moving devices.

japan walking running

japan olympics promotion

japan wayfinding system

Blue leads to departures and red takes people to arrivals – a simple scheme but easily visible when set against the more monotone surrounding interiors. The collaborative project featured contributions by PARTY with consultants from Nikken (photography by Kenta Hasegawa).

japan airport furniture

japan blue red departures

japan race track path

Of course, we all know the experience of being late for takeoff – beyond its aesthetics, it could indeed prove quite useful to have fast and slow lanes during busy times and for those whose commutes demand they make their plane in time.

Share on Facebook





[ By WebUrbanist in Design & Guerilla Ads & Marketing. ]

[ WebUrbanist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]


WebUrbanist

 
Comments Off on Commuter Olympics: Indoor Running Tracks Link Japanese Airport

Posted in Creativity

 

Think Tank launches Airport Helipak for Phantom Quadcopter

18 Dec

Camera bag manufacturer Think Tank Photo has announced a backpack designed specifically for photographers using Phantom Quadcopters paired with GoPro cameras. The Airport Helipak is said to accommodate DJI Phantom 2, Phantom 2 Vision or similar quadcopters with their accessories, along with a 15-inch laptop, small cameras such as GoPros, and personal effects. Read more

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Think Tank launches Airport Helipak for Phantom Quadcopter

Posted in Uncategorized

 

ThinkTank introduces new ‘Airport Roller Derby’ bag

18 Jun

thinktank_derby.jpg

If you want to bring the intensity of a full contact sport to the way you transport your camera gear, ThinkTank’s new Airport Roller Derby bag may interest you. It’s a large rolling bag built to accommodate a 15-inch laptop, up to two standard DSLRs with lenses attached and six to seven standard zoom lenses or strobes. With four dual wheels it will roll upright, tilted back or on its side. Read more

News: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on ThinkTank introduces new ‘Airport Roller Derby’ bag

Posted in Uncategorized

 

The Future Takes Flight: 13 Forward-Thinking Airport Ideas

10 Jun

[ By Steph in Architecture & Public & Institutional. ]

Futuristic Airports Main

With their inefficient terminals and bloated footprints, today’s airports are typically ill-equipped to adapt to sharp increases in demand, scarce land availability or new flight technologies. These 13 futuristic airport designs address current and upcoming air travel challenges, from beautiful expansions currently under construction to fantastical concepts that accommodate vertical lift-off.

Airport Skyscraper

Future Airports Skyscraper

Beijing is in dire need of new airports, but also doesn’t have a lot of acreage to spare. This concept for the 2012 eVolo Skyscraper Competition solves both problems with ‘airport skyscrapers’ shaped like giant mushrooms. Not only does this free up the space below, it also effectively reduces the length of the runways since wind speed is higher 450 meters in the air than it is at sea level.

Floating Airport for London with Underwater Tunnels

Future Airports Floating London 1

Using the surface of rivers and the sea also frees up precious land, as illustrated in this futuristic airport design by architecture firm Gensler. Envisioned for the Thames River, the London Britannia consists of a series of rounded pods connected to four floating runways anchored to the sea floor. Underground tunnels would connect passengers to the city and to European rail networks.

Shenzen Airport Mimics a Manta Ray

Future Airports Shenzen 1

Future Airports Shenzen 2

Taking inspiration from both the natural form of a manta ray and the more obvious shape of an airplane, the Shenzen airport extension in China is covered in thousands of hexagonal skylights across a steel and glass canopy, creating a honeycomb pattern within the undulating all-white interior.

Malpensa Airport Proposal

Future Airport Malpensa

A modular geometric roof consisting of brushed metal in three golden shades makes a big impact on the Malpensa Airport, creating a covered area that serves as an exhibition space and pedestrian walkway between the Expess Train Station and Terminal 1 of the Milan Airport.

Next Page – Click Below to Read More:
The Future Takes Flight 13 Forward Thinking Airport Ideas

Share on Facebook





[ By Steph in Architecture & Public & Institutional. ]

[ WebUrbanist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]


WebUrbanist

 
Comments Off on The Future Takes Flight: 13 Forward-Thinking Airport Ideas

Posted in Creativity

 

Futuristic Shenzen Airport Shaped Like a Manta Ray

28 Nov

[ By Steph in Architecture & Public & Institutional. ]

Shenzen Airport Manta Ray 1

Designed to mimic the natural shape of a manta ray (but also clearly reminiscent of an airplane), the new expansion of the Shenzen Bao’an International Airport in China  is covered in thousands of hexagonal skylights. Terminal 3 by Italian firm Studio Fuksas doubles the capacity of the existing airport and will accommodate 45 million passengers per year.

Shenzen Airport Manta Ray 2

Shenzen Airport Manta Ray 3

The firm studied a variety of life forms to come up with its highly distinctive, curving, all-white design. “The concept of the plan for Terminal 3 of Shenzen Bao’an international airport evokes the image of a manta ray, a fish that breathes and changes its own shape, undergoes variations, [and] turns into a bird to celebrate the emotion and fantasy of a flight,” they explain.

Shenzen Airport Manta Ray 4

The steel and glass canopy spans 262 feet (80 meters) across, and the honeycomb pattern of the windows reflects onto the glossy white floor and various stainless steel surfaces for a dazzling geometric effect. Voids in the floors of the three airport levels create double- to triple-height spaces.

Shenzen Airport Manta Ray 5

Those strange branch-like structures located throughout the interior are air conditioning vents inspired by abstracted trees. The entire structure measures over 5.3 million square feet. It opens to the public on November 28th, 2013. “The spatial concept is one of fluidity and combines two different ideas: the idea of movement and the idea of pause. Carefully considering the human experience of such environments, Studio Fuksas focused on processing times, walking distances, ease of orientation, crowding, and availability of desired amenities.”

Share on Facebook





[ By Steph in Architecture & Public & Institutional. ]

[ WebUrbanist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]


WebUrbanist

 
Comments Off on Futuristic Shenzen Airport Shaped Like a Manta Ray

Posted in Creativity

 

A Review of the ThinkTank Airport Commuter Camera Bag

09 Oct

If you’ve ever had to work your way through a busy airport with your gear, you know that an ordinary camera bag just isn’t going to cut it. Making sure everything is safely packed, moving through security, getting on and off your plane, working your way through yet another airport– it’s a challenge. Think Tank Photo addressed the challenge head-on not too long ago, when they introduced a new line of Airport Backpacks. The line includes (from biggest to smallest) the Airport Accelerator, Airport Commuter, and Airport Essentials, all of which meet U.S. and international carry-on standards. I’ve been putting the Commuter through its paces for the better part of a year, and– as someone who’s never owned a gear bag designed specifically around air travel– I’m really impressed.

As with all things Think Tank, the construction is impeccable. Heavy-duty zippers and stitching, comfortably padded straps and handles, as well as all of the pockets and compartments I’ve come to expect from Think Tank. While lots of pockets isn’t exactly innovative, Think Tank’s newer bags have also been designed with dedicated pockets for tablets or laptops. The Airport Backpack series is designed to hold both. The exterior-access pockets are also right where they do the most good, providing quick access to travel essentials like i.d., credentials, passports, boarding passes, and other travel necessities. A large side pocket is perfect for a bottle of water or paperback book.

All of that great exterior access doesn’t do you much good, though, if the interior doesn’t do its job well. Fortunately, the gear section of this bag is pretty remarkable. The two things I noticed while packing it were (1) how much it holds, and (2) how deep it is.  Without doing any reconfiguring of the pre-installed dividers (OK…I removed one little one in the middle), I packed three bodies, five lenses, two speelights, a set of Pocket Wizards, and all of the cards, cords, batteries, gels, film, pens, business cards, m&m’s, and all of accessories I needed.  And there was room for more.

Other “bonus features” include a locking security cable, removable waist belt, and tripod attachment straps.  To be honest, I was a little disappointed by the tripod attachment.  That great side pocket I mentioned earlier?  That’s where the feet of the tripod go, but I never felt the tripod was truly secure.  I’ll admit my tripod might be somewhat to blame– if it was more of a travel size or if it was carbon fiber I might feel differently.

The only other down side for me personally is that this is a lot of weight for my back.  It is all very well-padded and evenly distributed, but my back’s not what it used to be.  I’m hoping that an Airport 4-Sight rolling bag is somewhere in my future.

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

A Review of the ThinkTank Airport Commuter Camera Bag

The post A Review of the ThinkTank Airport Commuter Camera Bag by Jeff Guyer appeared first on Digital Photography School.


Digital Photography School

 
Comments Off on A Review of the ThinkTank Airport Commuter Camera Bag

Posted in Photography