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National Geographic announces 2016 Nature Photographer of the Year

11 Dec

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

National Geographic has selected the winners of its 2016 Nature Photographer of the Year competition. In addition to overall winners, there were also selections for landscapes, environmental issues, action and animal portraits. This year’s grand prize winner was Greg Lecoeur’s ‘Sardine Run.’

Grand Prize + 1st Place for Action photography: Greg Lecoeur: ‘Sardine Run’

During the sardine migration along the Wild Coast of South Africa, millions of sardines are preyed upon by marine predators such as dolphins, marine birds, sharks, whales, penguins, sailfishes, and sea lions. The hunt begins with common dolphins that have developed special hunting techniques to create and drive bait balls to the surface. In recent years, probably due to overfishing and climate change, the annual sardine run has become more and more unpredictable. It took me two weeks to have the opportunity to witness and capture this marine predation.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

First Place, Animal Portraits: Varun Aditya: ‘Dragging you deep into the woods!’

I shot this at Amboli, Maharashtra, India, on July 24, 2016, during a morning stroll into the blissful rain forest. Ceaseless drizzles dampened the woods for 10 hours a day; the serene gloom kept me guessing if it was night or day. The heavy fog, chilling breeze, and perennial silence could calm roaring sprits. And there I saw this beauty. I wondered if I needed more reasons to capture the habitat, for I was blessed to see this at the place I was at. I immediately switched from the macro to the wide-angle lens and composed this frame.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

1st Place, Environmental Issues: Vadim Balakin, ‘Life and Death’

These polar bear remains have been discovered at one of the islands of northern Svalbard, Norway. We do not know whether the bear died from starving or aging, but more likely if we see the good teeth status, it was from starving. They say nowadays that such remains are found very often, as global warming and the ice situation influence the polar bear population.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

1st Place, Landscape: Jacob Kaptein, ‘Struggle of Life’

Last year I participated in the Marius van der Sandt Beurs. This scholarship stimulates photography by young photographers. For a whole year I was guided by some excellent nature photographers to realize a project I wanted to accomplish. I chose a natural stream restoration project of a nature organization in the Netherlands. The first time I entered this patch of forest, I immediately saw this little beech. I came back several times to photograph it. One evening, just after sunset, all the light conditions were perfect. I stood in the cold water for more than an hour making many photos while I experimented with different shutter speeds.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

2nd Place, Action: Tori Shea-Ostberg: ‘Approach’

An EF2 tornado bears down on a home in Wray, Colorado, on May 7, 2016. As soon as we were safe, as the tornado roared off into the distance through a field before roping out, we scrambled up the hill to check on the residents. Thankfully, everyone was all right, and we were grateful for that. As I was checking in with a young woman coming out of the basement, we became very aware of a strong new circulation right above our heads. We needed to run for cover and did so before saying a proper goodbye.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

2nd Place, Animal Portraits: Michael O’Neill: ‘Proud Mama’

A female peacock bass guards her brood in a Miami, Florida, freshwater lake. She will protect her young fry from a variety of predatory fish until they are large enough to fend for themselves. This tropical freshwater species, also known as the peacock cichlid, was introduced in Florida in the mid-1980s from South America to control the tilapia population, another invasive species. Throughout its native range (and in Florida) it’s a prized sportfish known for its fighting spirit.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

2nd Place, Environmental Issues: Chris McCann: ‘Outside Facebook HQ’

Eighty percent of the San Francisco Bay Area wetlands—16,500 acres—has been developed for salt mining. Water is channeled into these large ponds, leaves through evaporation, and the salt is then collected. The tint of each pond is an indication of its salinity. Microorganisms inside the pond change color according to the salinity of its environment. This high-salinity salt pond is located right next to Facebook headquarters, where about 4,000 people work every day.

2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

2nd Place, Landscape: Alessandro Gruzza: ‘Wild Rink’

The first cold days of winter have frozen the surface of a pond, and the first snowfall has revealed its delicate beauty. In low-pressure conditions, southwest winds push the clouds against the vertical peaks of the Pale di San Martino. At dusk, a long shutter speed enhances the movement of the clouds around Cimon della Pala, one of the highest peaks in the Dolomites.

You can see additional photos from the competition on National Geographic’s website.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
 

Threading Rainbows: Spectral String Art Looks Like Strands of Light

11 Dec

[ By WebUrbanist in Art & Sculpture & Craft. ]

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Using a simple material palette of thread, wood and nails, artist Gabriel Dawe‘s latest cascading color creation combines thousands of threads to make a remarkable interior rainbow.

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Plexus #35 is on display at the Toledo Museum of Art (images by Andrew Weber), a featured highlight in the center of the Great Gallery illuminated against dark red walls and framed oil paintings via a skylight above.

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The entire color spectrum is represented, meticulously organized strand by strand — a single twist between a pair of origin and termination lines ensures that the work appears different from every angle.

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Other works by Dawe feature similar themes in different hues and shades, often intricately woven to create overlaps. By comparison, this is one of his simplest pieces yet arguably one of his most powerful.

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“Originally from Mexico City, Gabriel Dawe creates site-specific installations that explore the connection between fashion and architecture, and how they relate to the human need for shelter in all its shapes and forms.”

“His work is centered in the exploration of textiles, aiming to examine the complicated construction of gender and identity in his native Mexico and attempting to subvert the notions of masculinity and machismo prevalent in the present day.”

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[ By WebUrbanist in Art & Sculpture & Craft. ]

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A fresh look at Dorothea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment

11 Dec

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Dorothea Lange’s photos of Japanese interment in America are less well-known than her other Farm Security Administration works like ‘Migrant Mother’ – and there’s a reason for that. The unflinching view of the events captured in her photos landed them in the US National Archive, with many labeled ‘impounded,’ where they sat for decades.

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US government announced the mandatory relocation of people of Japanese ancestry, the majority of which were American citizens, to internment camps. Lange was commissioned to photograph the events, both as people were displaced from homes and business, and later as they reported to assembly centers and were ultimately sent to the camps.

Lange’s photos painted a brutally honest picture of every phase of the internment, and were seemingly met with displeasure from the military as they were quietly impounded and archived. A 2006 book put the censored images front and center for the first time. You can see a few of the images here; Anchor Editions has published some information about the images and is offering prints with half of proceeds going to the ACLU. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
 

A fresh look at Dorthea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment

10 Dec

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Dorothea Lange’s photos of Japanese interment in America are less well-known than her other Farm Security Administration works like ‘Migrant Mother’ – and there’s a reason for that. The unflinching view of the events captured in her photos landed them in the US National Archive, with many labeled ‘impounded,’ where they sat for decades.

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US government announced the mandatory relocation of people of Japanese ancestry, the majority of which were American citizens, to internment camps. Lange was commissioned to photograph the events, both as people were displaced from homes and business, and later as they reported to assembly centers and were ultimately sent to the camps.

Lange’s photos painted a brutally honest picture of every phase of the internment, and were seemingly met with displeasure from the military as they were quietly impounded and archived. A 2006 book put the censored images front and center for the first time. You can see a few of the images here; Anchor Editions has published some information about the images and is offering prints with half of proceeds going to the ACLU. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
 

Panasonic Lumix FZ2500 / FZ2000 real world samples gallery

10 Dec
Straight-out-of-camera JPEG. 132mm equiv., ISO 125, 1/640 sec, F4.5. Photo by Carey Rose

The Panasonic Lumix FZ2500 / FZ2000, the company’s followup to the popular FZ1000, comes with a whole new 24-480mm F2.8-4.5 lens in front of its 20MP 1″-type CMOS sensor. It also comes with a built-in neutral density filter, 4K video and 4K photo modes and Panasonic’s Depth-from-Defocus (DFD) technology for quick and accurate autofocus.

We’ve taken advantage of some rare sunny weather in the midst of this Seattle winter to put together a samples gallery from this stills and video superzoom – take a look.

See our Panasonic FZ2500 / FZ2000 real world samples gallery

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
 

Affinity Photo for Windows now available, Mac version updated to 1.5

10 Dec

Following the beta announced last month, Serif has officially launched the finalized version of Affinity Photo for Windows. The new application follows in the footsteps of Affinity Photo for Mac and aims to offer photo editing capabilities similar to that of Photoshop, only at a lower $ 39.99 cost. In addition to the new Windows version, the Mac edition of Affinity Photo has received a substantial update to version 1.5.

Affinity Photo for Windows launches with the same features arriving in Affinity Photo for Mac version 1.5, ensuring the two applications match each other for better cross-platform support. In addition to the features found in older versions of Affinity Photo, both the Windows and Mac 1.5 editions offer, according to Serif:

  • Macros to record and replay a set of commands
  • Advanced HDR merge producing deep unbounded 32-bit images
  • A full tone mapping workspace for both HDR and LDR images
  • Focus stacking to achieve large depth of field from multiple images
  • Full batch processing to process large folders of images in one go
  • An all-new way to edit 360 degree images
  • Direct PSD write-back
  • 32-bit editing including OpenEXR import & export
  • Automatic lens corrections based on profiles of thousands of lens & body combinations

Anyone who owns an older version of Affinity Photo for Mac can download the 1.5 update for free now. The Mac and Windows versions are both priced at $ 49.99 USD, though Serif has dropped the price to $ 39.99 / £29.99 / €39.99 until December 22.

Via: Serif

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Have your say! DPReview Readers’ Choice Awards open for voting

10 Dec

All five initial categories of our 2016 Readers’ Choice Awards are now open for voting. Help decide which cameras and lenses take home the ultimate bragging rights. Vote now

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Art in the Shadows: Everyday Objects Cast Unexpected Shapes Onto Paper

10 Dec

[ By SA Rogers in Art & Drawing & Digital. ]

art-in-the-shadows-3

Has doodling ever been more creative than this? While most people wouldn’t give a second’s thought to the shape an everyday object’s shadow casts upon adjacent surfaces, artist Vincent Bal looks at them and sees the beginnings of a character or scene. It might be a phone charger, a fallen leaf, a drinking glass or a Christmas ornament, but in its shadow, Bal sees far more than the object itself.

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Each of Bal’s quick and clever illustrations is a testament to the creativity of an artist’s brain. Calling his work ‘shadowology,’ Bal plays around with silhouettes and light sources to find inspiration for sketches most people would never dream up. It takes the game of finding shapes in the clouds and applies an artist’s hand to the process, embellishing the shapes into something more.

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Calling himself a ‘filmmaker and doodler and procrastinator from Belgium’, Bal shares his work on his popular Instagram account and sells prints on Etsy.

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[ By SA Rogers in Art & Drawing & Digital. ]

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Have Your Say: Best Zoom Lens of 2016

09 Dec

Have Your Say: Best Zoom Lens of 2016

The end of the year is almost upon us, and as usual, 2016 saw plenty of new lenses released, including several excellent zooms. We’ve used a lot of them and tested some, but we want to hear from you – what were your favorite zoom lenses of 2016? 

For the sake of a manageable list, we’ve omitted ‘kit’ zoom lenses and most variable-aperture telezooms from this poll. If there’s a particularly high-performing example of either type which you’d like to see represented in our final selection, or a late 2015 release that you think should be under consideration, leave a comment!

Click through this slideshow for a reminder of the major releases and a chance cast your vote. Voting ends at midnight on December 31st.

Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L III USM

The Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L III USM is the third revision of Canon’s well-known ultra-wide zoom lens. It has 16 elements, one of which is dual surface aspherical, while the other is ground aspherical. The lens has a fluorine coating and is dust and water resistant. The minimum focus distance is 0.28m.

Our early impressions of this lens are very positive indeed. It’s  costly piece of glass, but for Canon photographers looking for a versatile wideangle zoom, the 16-35mm F2.8 III is hard to beat. Is this one of your lenses of the year? Cast your vote and let us know.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4 IS Pro is a powerful carry-everywhere zoom lens (24-200mm equiv.) that offers incredible versatility in a relatively small package. Combined with Olympus’ 5-axis IBIS in the new OM-D E-M1 II, it can offer up to 6.5 stops of image stabilization.

On top of that, the minimum focus distance at the 12mm end is a miniscule 1.5cm from the front element of the lens, and 27cm at the telephoto end of 100mm. All of that power is housed in a splashproof, dustproof, and freezeproof body. Is this powerful zoom on your wishlist? Cast your vote and let us know.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E FL ED VR

The Nikon EF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E FL ED VR is the company’s latest fast telephoto zoom. It offers up to four stops of shake reduction, a Silent Wave Motor, and assignable buttons on the lens barrel. It has six ED, one Flourite and one HRI elements as well as Nano Crystal and Fluorine coatings to make it easy to remove moisture and smudges from exposed elements. The lens is constructed of magnesium alloy and is sealed against dust and moisture.

Early test results suggest that this lens is a high performer, but the swapping of focus and zoom rings has angered some commenters. What do you think? 

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM Art

Sigma’s 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM Art provides a 75-150mm focal length range on the APS-C format DSLRs for which it’s designed. Offering a fast maximum aperture and standard ‘Art’-series construction quality the 50-100mm is solid, heavy and luxuriously engineered. 

The 50-100mm features three FLD (F Low Dispersion) glass elements, one SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass element, and one high-refractive index, high-dispersion glass element. Is it one of your favorite lenses of 2016?

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art

The Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art is an ultra-wide-angle zoom for full-frame DSLRs, which features the largest aspherical glass molded element in the industry. The 12-24mm F4 also features lens elements made with FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) glass, which Sigma claims is equivalent to calcium fluorite in performance. 

The 12-24mm is a big lens, measuring 132mm long, with a diameter of 102mm and a weight of 1,150g (40.6oz) but optically, we’ve been very impressed by its performance. Is this the third-party wideangle you’ve been waiting for? Cast your vote and let us know. 

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM

The Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM is a premium standard zoom for the Sony A-mount. Construction comprises 18 elements in 13 groups, and features three aspherical elements, including an extreme aspherical (XA) element. An ED (extra low dispersion) and Super ED glass element help minimize chromatic aberration while maintaining high resolution and bokeh characteristics.

It’s big, it’s costly, and it’s built to last. Is Sony’s FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM one of your picks for best zoom of 2016?

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS

Sony had a big year this year, and alongside the 24-70mm F2.8 FE, it also released theFE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS telephoto zoom. Like the 24-70mm GM, this lens features XA, Super ED, and ED glass elements to help achieve high resolution and desirable bokeh characteristics. Construction comprises 23 elements in 18 group, and a ‘Nano’ anti-reflective coating ensures reduced flare and ghosting. An additional fluorine coating to the front of the lens help keep it clean, and the lens is dust and moisture resistant.

Like it’s 24-70mm cousin, this 70-200mm F2.8 zoom is a premium lens, with construction (and price) to match. Does it make your list of standout zoom lenses of 2016? Click to the next slide and cast your vote!

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Vote Now!

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Have your say

$ (document).ready(function() { Poll({“pollId”:”0973815126″,”openForVoting”:true,”mainElementId”:”poll1″,”slot”:null,”isSingleChoicePoll”:false,”minNumberOfChoices”:1,”maxNumberOfChoices”:3}); })
Have Your Say: Best Zoom Lens of 2016
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Canon 16-35mm F2.8L III

Olympus M.Zuiko 12-100mm F4.0

Sigma 12-24mm F4 Art

Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 Art

Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM

Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E

Voting is easy – you pick your favorite products by dragging and dropping. You can pick up to three, and rank them in order of priority.

Poll Rules:

  1. This poll is meant to be a bit of fun. It’s not sponsored, promoted or paid for in any way and DPReview staff don’t care how you vote, so please don’t start a flame-war in the comments. I.e., please don’t be a troll.
  2. It’s fine to vote for products that you haven’t used (some aren’t yet shipping, after all) but please don’t vote purely just to sandbag another product or brand. I.e., please don’t be a troll.
  3. Please only vote once, from a single account. Creating and voting from multiple accounts for a community poll of no consequence is a silly thing to do with your time. See points 1 and 2, above, about not being a troll.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Have your say: Best prime lens of 2016

09 Dec

Have your say: Best prime lens of 2016

It’s a great time to be a photographer. Based on reader interest and preferences, we’ve rounded up a total of twelve prime lenses that were released in 2016 for your consideration in this poll. They run the gamut in terms of lens mount, focal length, maximum aperture, and of course, use case. 

Which of these prime lenses is most exciting to you? Which do you already have, or are looking to add, to your particular kit? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow. For now, let’s dig in and take a look at this year’s contenders. 

Please note that for the sake of a manageable list, we have excluded some of the more exotic manual focus primes from the likes of Zeiss, and several third-party MF options (Samyang/Rokinon etc). If you feel that a particular lens of this kind deserves consideration, feel free to leave a comment.

Canon EF-M 28mm F3.5 Macro IS STM

The announcement of Canon’s EOS M5 was largely welcome news, but came with a side of grumbling – the Canon EF-M lens lineup is still, for many, sorely lacking. This 28mm F3.5 Macro is looking to address that somewhat. Offering an equivalent focal length of 45mm, this lens won’t offer you much in the way of working distance, but with a 1.2x magnification super-macro mode and built-in LED lights, the EF-M 28mm Macro is a unique offering in the marketplace and comes with an affordable MSRP to boot.

Does this lens have you looking closer at the Canon M system more closely than before? Has the 1.2x magnification made a difference to your macro photography? Let us know by casting your vote for it in the poll.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Fujifilm XF 23mm F2 R WR

Fujifilm’s ever-growing lens lineup continues to impress us, and the XF 23mm F2 R WR is no exception. The company’s existing 23mm F1.4 is quite good, but also quite large and makes no mention of weather resistance – two aspects this newer design is meant to address. You lose a stop of light, but you also gain a noticeable speed boost when it comes to continuous autofocus (and you can save a few pennies with this model, too). Lastly, for X-Pro users, the barrel design is intended to keep the lens from intruding too far into the hybrid viewfinder when used in ‘optical’ mode.

Is this the game-changing 35mm equivalent lens you’ve been waiting for? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Nikon PC Nikkor 19mm F4E ED

This one’s been a long time coming. Nikon’s line of PC lenses, which stands for ‘perspective control,’ is all about offering tilt and shift capabilities for those that need it. As an example, it allows for correction of converging vertical lines if you’re photographing a tall building and must point your camera slightly up, and it also allows more control over your depth of field by allowing you to adjust the actual plane of focus. While this lens still isn’t as wide as Canon’s TS-E 17mm lens, it does offer Nikon users a focal length usefully wider than the existing 24mm PC lens – but being a specialized tool, it comes with a hefty price tag.

Is this lens enough to satisfy your needs for wide-angle tilt-shift photography? Does it allow you to get significant images you just couldn’t get before? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Nikon AF-S 105mm F1.4 E ED

Few lenses have created as much of a stir around the DPReview offices as Nikon’s 105mm F1.4 E ED when it was announced. As the first ever 105mm lens with this wide of an aperture, it’s a much-needed update (though some might argue, not a replacement) for Nikon’s older 105mm and 135mm F2 DC (defocus control) designs, which date back to the ’90s. It’s quite well-built, comes with some weather sealing and has been shown to have staggeringly good optics, even wide open. 

Has Nikon created the ultimate bokeh-licious portrait lens? Let us know if this lens takes the cake by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm F1.2

This lens is perhaps most significant in that it’s the first Olympus prime lens to carry the ‘Pro’ designation. Along with tank-like build quality, the ‘Pro’ label is a reliable indicator of overall optical quality, including sharpness and smooth out-of-focus character. That it’s also insanely fast to focus doesn’t hurt, either. It costs a pretty penny, but the 25mm F1.2 is one of our favorite pairings with Olympus’ new E-M1 Mark II. For those that want the fastest lens for their Micro 4/3 system that is also the toughest, it stands alone.

Is the 25mm F1.2 Pro the lens you’ve been waiting for within the Micro 4/3 universe? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 300mm F4 IS Pro

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 300mm F4 IS Pro is one of only two Olympus lenses at the time of this writing to offer built-in image stabilization – this is because most Olympus bodies already offer impressive in-body image stabilization, but with their newer models, these image stabilized lenses can work in tandem with the existing stabilizer to offer up to a claimed 6.5 stops of hand-holdability. Our favorite part? This is a figure Olympus says is limited by the rotation of the Earth. In any case, this 300mm lens is sharp wide-open, built like a tank, incredibly fast to focus and we’ve been able to get reliably sharp shots with shutter speeds as slow as 1/15 of a second when paired with the E-M1 II. No, that isn’t a typo.

Has the Olympus 300mm F4 Pro changed the way you shoot Micro Four Thirds? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Panasonic Lumix G Leica DG Summilux 12mm F1.4 ASPH

In addition to having the longest name in this group, this Panaleica 12mm F1.4 has the distinction of being the fastest wide-angle autofocus lens in the Micro Four Thirds universe. And with ‘Leica’ in the name, you’re going to pay for it – but for those heavily invested in the system, it’s worth it (and it’s weather-sealed, at least). I’s great for some subject isolation at wide apertures and also for shooting in available light, but it also produces gorgeous sunstars, and predictably, is very sharp.

Has this lens become your go-to for available light Micro Four Thirds shooting? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sigma 30mm F1.4 DC DN | C (E-Mount / M43 Mount)

Sigma has been on a roll over the past several years, with its revamped Art, Contemporary and Sports lineups. With the 30mm F1.4 Contemporary, they’ve continued this roll, offering absolutely excellent performance on Sony’s E-Mount (and for a fraction of the price of any first-party competitor), and above average performance on Micro Four Thirds. The length of the lens might look a little awkward on smaller bodies, but the lightweight build ensures a good balance without feeling cheap at all.

Is this the fast, standard prime you’ve been waiting for? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sigma 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art

The Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art is, unquestionably, a beast – but appropriately, it offers beastly optical performance as well. It’s a bargain compared to first-party equivalents, and though (as always) you’ll want to watch out for copy variation, it’ll give those more expensive competitors a run for their money when used wide open. If you’re in the market for a fast-aperture lens for reportage or some shallow depth-of-field for portrait isolation, the Sigma 85mm Art deserves a look.

Are you a Sigma Art convert? Did you save a ton of money over first-party options by picking one up for yourself? Let us know if this prime lens is your pick for the best of 2016 by casting your vote in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM

The Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM continues 2016’s tradition of ‘bigger and better.’ It’s not quite the behemoth that is the Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art, but it’s close – and for good reason. Sony has said that it’s designed the G Master lenses, including the 85mm, to ‘last forever’ – they’re over-engineered when it comes to sharpness, and rely on optical corrections for characteristics like lateral chromatic aberration, as opposed to relying on software. The rounded aperture blades provide circular out-of-focus highlights even as you stop down, and the lens offers environmental sealing as well.

Are you an E-mount shooter that’s finally found your perfect portrait lens? Let us know by casting your vote for the Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Tamron SP 85mm F1.8 Di VC USD

Noticing a pattern yet? This is the third 85mm lens in a row in this category, but it does plenty to differentiate itself from its Sigma and Sony counterparts. First, yes, the Tamron does offer a slower maximum aperture. It makes up for that somewhat, though, by being the only stabilized 85mm prime lens on the market. It’s fully weather-sealed, something that is universal to Tamron’s SP line, and universally absent from Sigma’s Art line. It’s also the smallest of this year’s newly announced 85mm lenses, and impressively sharp wide-open.

Has Tamron’s 85mm F1.8 VC tempted you away from other first-and-third party lens options? Let us know by casting your vote for it in the poll at the end of the slideshow.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Tamron SP 90mm F2.8 Di VC USD 1:1 Macro

Tamron has been making 90mm F2.8 macro lenses for decades, but its latest redesign is more than just slapping the same old optical formula into a shiny new design. They’ve added their trademark Vibration Compensation technology as well as increasing the speed of autofocus. A new fluorine coating on the front element will repel dust, water and fingerprints more effectively, and as with all members of Tamron’s revamped SP line, is fully dust-and-moisture sealed. Not everyone needs a macro lens, but the Tamron has also proven to be a solid portrait lens as well.

Did you update to the new SP Macro from an older Tamron model, or even a first-party macro lens? Let us know by casting your vote in the poll on the next slide.

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Have Your Say: Best Prime Lens of 2016
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Canon EF-M 28mm F3.5 Macro

Fujifilm XF 23mm F2

Nikon PC Nikkor 19mm F4E

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 105mm F1.4E

Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm F1.2 Pro

Olympus M.Zuiko 300mm F4 Pro

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm F1.4

Sigma 30mm F1.4 C

Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art

Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM

Tamron SP 85mm F1.8

Tamron SP 90mm F2.8

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Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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