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Posts Tagged ‘Photographer’

Canon defends embarrassing photo sharing gaff, photographer fires back

14 Jan

Yesterday, we reported on an understandable if embarrassing mistake by Canon Italy and Canon Spain. The two branches of Canon had shared a composite photo that contained stolen elements from a photo by travel photographer Elia Locardi all over their social media accounts; to make things worse, those elements were shot with a Fujifilm camera.

The reasonable response would have been to admit the mistake, apologize, and move on. This morning, however, Canon responded through social media and managed to somehow make things worse.

In its response, the company confirmed our assertion that it had pulled the photograph from the royalty free photo sharing website Unsplash, but claimed that it was not the same photo, pointing to “seasonal variation” between the two shots and completely ignoring the fact that parts of the photograph are exact clones.

Here is the response in full, posted as a comment on the Canon Italia Facebook share:

This answer, for obvious reasons, has photographers shaking their heads. There is no denying that the photograph uses stolen elements from Locardi’s—the same exact sky and water patterns don’t just repeat themselves willy nilly, making sure that the same bird is flying through the shot at the exact same time for good measure.

But the fact that Canon shared a composite with part of his work isn’t what bothers Locardi. Speaking with him yesterday and this morning, it was obvious that this was just an odd and funny moment for him. What does bother him about Canon’s response is something else entirely, as he explained on Facebook this morning:

Guy takes part of my Fujifilm photo, uploads it to a copyright free website. Then Canon shares it all over their social media. And now, Canon’s official response is that it’s not my photo? And the differences are just a “seasonal variation.”

LOL, really? As if this story couldn’t become more awkward.

But seriously, the greater part of this story and by far the largest issue here, is the fact that Canon is using a free image resource like Unsplash to fuel their social media rather than tapping into their large community of photographers. That’s incredibly insulting to both their own consumers and to the photography community itself.

Speaking with me directly this morning, Elia repeated the last part of his Facebook post before he continued on to say that this kind of thing, “encompasses almost everything that’s wrong with our industry today.” To really drive home the point, he also posted the comment as a response to Canon Italia’s comment on Facebook.

Here’s one last look at these two photos, just for good measure:

The original by Elia Locardi
A composite from Unsplash that obviously takes the sky and parts of the foreground directly from Elia’s image.

We have not received a response to yesterday’s request for comment from Canon, but we will update this post if and when we hear back.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Nine straight-forward tips from an award-winning travel photographer

13 Jan

Travel photographer Bob Holmes recently put together this quick-tips video for Advancing Your Photography in which he shares nine useful photography tips; or, as Holmes puts it in the video, nine ‘crutches’ for when you feel like the muse has deserted you.

They’re basic tips, but this is what Holmes looks for when he goes out to shoot—lines, punctuation, and energy—and they’re the reason he has managed to continue producing award-winning work year after year after year.

For those of you who prefer reading to watching, here’s a quick summary of all nine tips:

  1. Look for leading lines – they can lead your viewer through the composition
  2. Look for diagonals – they give a dynamic feel to your photos
  3. Look for horizontal lines – they will give a calm feel to your photos
  4. Capture gestures – they can really help your photo pop
  5. Try to find ‘punctuation’ – like a splash of color or a solitary person in a larger landscape
  6. Put energy into your photos – you can do this by capturing movement in the frame
  7. Be receptive – let the picture ‘impress itself’ upon you
  8. Look at art for inspiration – famous paintings are often examples of fantastic composition and great lighting at work.
  9. Look at photography books for inspiration – there’s a reason the Irving Penn’s and Henri Cartier-Bresson’s of the world are still remembered today.

The tips might seem overly simplistic, but simple isn’t always a bad thing when you’re trying to get out of a rut. And it’s not like Bob Holmes doesn’t know what he’s talking about: he’s the only photographer to ever win the Travel Photographer of the Year Award 5 times, most recently in 2017.

Check out the video above for photo to go with each of the tips, and then let us know if you have your own “get out of a rut” routine in the comments.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

11 Jan

There’s an idea that has been perpetuated, however unintentionally, that photographers do one thing and one thing only. The illusion is that someone who carries the title of “professional photographer” must simply make photographs, sell them, and that is the sole source of their income.

It’s true that there are some of us who do in fact make our way exclusively through our photography as an end in itself. I feel that most if not all of us camera jockeys (especially the landscape and nature types) hold as an ultimate goal the notion that one day we can reach a point in our careers when our photographs alone can carry us through life.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

A few years back I was happy to learn and am equally glad to tell you now, that most if not all photographers are extremely diversified in the way they make a living from photography. Even most of the greats…from Ansel Adams to Cartier-Bresson, did other forms of photo-related work until they become famous enough to concentrate on their photography as a full-time job.

Almost every photographer diversifies to some extent. In this article, we’re going to talk about why it’s so important to branch out into other areas of photography beyond just making photos.

The Art of Diversification

It’s not generally disclosed to us when we first start out in photography that the majority of professional shooters don’t simply make their living from selling prints. This is especially true during these enormously competitive days when everyone with a cell phone is a “professional” photographer.

The truth is, it’s just plain difficult to make money from the sale of prints alone. You have to diversify in order to survive. The great thing is, if you’re truly in love with photography, everything that you do that centers around your beloved medium doesn’t seem like work. And it’s that word, “work”, that makes the world go round.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

Diversifying yourself means that you will likely need to take a tiny step just outside the perimeter of your comfort zone. You must actively be on the watch for new opportunities to either market yourself through new outlets and to investigate what possibilities might be available to you. The key is to not limit yourself just because a certain opportunity is new to you or because it may not involve actual camera work.

Ways to Diversify Yourself

You may be thinking, “Alright, I need to diversify…but how and with what?” This goes back to what we spoke about a little earlier about how today’s world of digital photography has become more far-reaching than ever before. There is an incredible number of new ways for you to branch out into other areas of photography. Really, you are only limited by your ambition and your willingness to seek out brand new streams of creativity and dare I say, fresh revenue.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

The most rewarding method to diversify yourself and your horizons, is by helping your fellow photographers through artistic and technical education.

I got my own start in the photographic educational world right here at Digital Photography School. That opened up amazing new opportunities for me to not only expand myself as a photographer but also to help others who are just beginning their own journeys. Look for ways to give back to your peers and teach what you know. This could be through writing, giving photography workshops, educational videos, and even gear reviews.

The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer

By no means are these the only ways to branch out and diversify yourself. The key is to start looking for the outlets to begin with. Once you do, you might be shocked to learn about all the ways photography impacts people’s lives beyond the obvious.

If you’re not keen on the educational route (you should really try it) then keep searching and be open to other areas of enrichment. Start a newsletter showcasing your work and link to gear you use (there are some great affiliate programs out there to help you make an income that way). Try blogging about your photo outings. Building a simple blog space is easier than ever these days. Most importantly, don’t allow yourself to grow stagnant and stop looking for ways to grow.

Some Final Thoughts….

Is it possible to make a living from only selling prints or through only making photographs? Absolutely. Depending on your own genre of photography it could be more or less difficult. Generally, the majority of photographers whose main income does, in fact, come from print sales find themselves looking for other ways to incorporate photography as a part of a larger professional whole.

I found that I loved teaching others about photography and writing about all the aspects of making photographs. This led me to produce my own Lightroom presets and a whole host of other unlikely photography related jobs that I could never have imagined were possible only four or five years ago.

The most important thing to remember is that diversifying yourself and your talents can do nothing but good and help you to grow as a photographer. Never stop looking for ways to advance yourself not only monetarily but also creatively in your work. Branch out. Reach out. Carpe consequat…seize the photography.

The post The Importance of Diversification as a Photographer by Adam Welch appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

17 Dec

Fondly known as the “walk around lens” by professionals and hobbyists alike, the 24-70mm lens is the staple of any photography kit! A lens that offers diversity and functionality, its range makes the 24-70mm lens a remarkable companion for a vast array of photo shoots. From wide captures to close-up portraits, and everything in between, this lens is one that many photographers jump for immediately.

Camera brands such as Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Sony, Sigma, and Tamron understand this and have offered a rather wonderful selection of 24-70mm lenses from which to choose. Several professionals actually own more than one 24-70mm, as this lens has the potential of becoming the most used glass in your photographic arsenal.

Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

Why? Well, it’s awesome of course! The benefits of the 24-70mm lens are as priceless as our love for it. Here are some of the reasons why you want to have this lens in your bag.

No Learning Curve

The focal range of the 24-70mm lens is greatly inspired by the human eye. As such, this lens allows brand new photographers to learn with more ease than some other types of lenses due to its lack of distortion.

It is much easier to study composition when you can photograph similarly to how your eye sees naturally. Some wide angle lenses have a curve to the glass, which causes the subjects to warp when improperly photographed. The 24mm aspect of this lens offers no ultra-wide angle distortion while still offering a rather wide capture, perfect for simply concentrating on the best arrangement of elements.

There is equally little trouble with the rest of the focal range. The range passes through 50mm, a commonly used focal length for portraiture. The 70mm offers a very nice zoomed close-up. This lens is a great stepping stone to a variety of focal lengths, such as the 70-200mm lens.

Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

Close Focusing Abilities

This lens is absolutely excellent for a subject that happens to be in close proximity to the glass. The minimum focusing distance does vary depending on models, but it averages 38 centimeters (15 inches) from the glass. To give perspective on how close this is, the average focusing distance for most lenses is 48 centimeters (19 inches), although this is affected by whether your camera is full frame or not, the type of lens, etc.

Although the 24-70mm is not a macro lens (whose minimum focusing distances are around 20 centimeters), it can still take beautiful close-up photographs of flowers and other favorite macro subjects.

Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

Versatile Range

Arguably the most important benefit of the 24-70mm lens is its versatility. The range offers limitless possibilities, with an added boost of immense adaptability in the face of various photo shoots.


You can easily go from a wide angle to a zoom with this beauty, acclimating as quickly as your subjects change. This lens also allows you to capture a large variety of shots per session without the need to consistently change your lens. Considering our photography game with clients is primarily speed and efficiency, the 24-70mm will quickly become your best friend for this reason alone.

The versatility allows you to pack just this one lens when you go gallivanting across the world on vacations or destination shoots, an ideal prospect in and of itself. The 24-70mm lens is also a favorite of wedding photographers, as it allows them to capture precious moments without lapsing to change out gear. As previously touched upon, the focal range also covers the significant focal lengths in the photography world, such as the 50mm and the 70mm.

Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

Robust and Comfortable Build

Most 24-70mm lenses are rather robust little creations, with a comfortable build to last. Knowing that this lens is referred to as the walk around lens, most brands have ensured that your faithful companion is able to outlast most of your adventures.

From weather protection offered by some manufacturers, to solid and sturdy bodies, the 24-70mm is ready for most anything you can throw at it. This lens is also rather comfortable to hold, considering it isn’t very long nor terribly short.

Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

Size

Of course, we cannot discuss build without talking about size. At an average size of 3.28 x 3.28 x 4.86 inches and weight of approximately 2 pounds (900g), the 24-70mm is neither the largest nor the heaviest lens on the market. Quite the contrary, this lens happens to fit into most cases and isn’t the world’s worst hassle to carry.

In comparison to the rest of my kit, my 50mm (f/1.2) lens weighs more despite being shorter. To add even more praise, I have been easily able to put this lens with a camera body into a regular old purse. The amount of use and adaptability you can accomplish with this lens greatly outweighs any physical burdens of transporting it and many would argue that this lens is the same size as the average, most common lenses.

Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens

Now that the 24-70mm has (hopefully) won you over, there comes the burden of choosing which one to get. There are a variety of different 24-70mm lenses, ranging not just by brand, but also by aperture and weight. Here are some, just to name a few:

Canon

Canon’s collection of lenses is home to the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, and Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens. The f/2.8 aperture version is the most commonly seen 24-70mm lens, due to its beautiful depth of field and low light capabilities (remember, the wider the aperture, the more light the lens lets in!).



The EF 24-70mm f/2.8L (above left) is the predecessor of the newer EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM (above middle), and those on a budget may do well looking into the original lens which landed an iconic spot in Canon’s lineup. The updated version features improvements to image sharpness, vignetting, and AF speed. That being said, these improvements come at a rather substantial price tag. When pairing with a camera body that features advanced auto-focus systems, the version II is significantly faster than its predecessor. However, if you own one of the older bodies, you won’t see a significant difference. Like version I, version II features weather sealing with a front filter in place, which separates this lens from its competitors.

Canon’s EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens (above right) is another option. Although it does not feature a 2.8 aperture, the addition of image stabilization may sway some to purchase this version. Some of the benefits of this lens over its f/2.8 companion are reduced size/weight, image stabilization, and much lower cost. Another huge benefit is maximum magnification (MM). The 24-70 f/4L IS features an impressive 0.70x magnification (compared to 0.21x for the 24-70L II) which means it can double as a macro lens in a pinch.

Nikon

 

Nikon has the AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR ($ 2396 USD) and AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm F2.8G ED ($ 1796 USD), with a $ 600 difference between them (at the time of writing this article). The 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR is on the larger size of the 24-70mm array of lenses, being an inch longer than its predecessor and a bit wider. However, both of these lenses are extremely sharp in practical use, a wonderful testament to the models. Unfortunately, there is quite a bit of vignetting at the wider apertures. The f/2.8E ED VR version features image stabilization and vibration reduction, unlike the 24-70mm F2.8G ED.

Tamron

Tamron is home to their 24-70mm f/2.8 DI VC USD Lens, which is still one of the only f/2.8 24-70mm lenses with image stabilization. Tamron’s vibration control system allows this lens up to 4-stops of camera shake compensation. The ability of this lens to capture sharp images of static subjects in low light is extremely beneficial, given its low light capability. This lens is also significantly more cost-effective than the Canon lenses. Sadly, you can expect anywhere from 2-3 stops vignetting on a full-frame camera, wide open, depending on the focal length. However, this lens is quite sharp and was noted to out-perform Nikon’s 24-70mm not too long ago. Unfortunately, the AF has been said to not always be consistent.

Note: Read reviews for lenses before you make any decisions.

Sigma

Sigma has the Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM ART. This lens is significantly heavier than some of the other 24-70mm lenses mentioned, primarily the Canon 2.8 version II. The build quality is excellent given the comparatively affordable price tag. This lens features built-in vibration reduction just like the Tamron equivalent, and a minimum focusing distance of 37 centimeters.

For more on other 24-70mm lenses see these dPS reviews and comparisons:

  • Lens Comparison 24-70mm f/2.8 Canon Versus Tamron
  • Field Test and Thoughts: Tamron 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 Lens
  • Writer’s Favourite Lens – Nikon 24-70 mm F2.8

Your turn

Now that you’ve learned of the wonders of this charming lens, what are you waiting for?!

Have you used a 24-70mm lens before? What are your favorite things about it? Please share in the comments below.

The post Why Every Photographer Needs a 24-70mm Lens by Anabel DFlux appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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These are the winners of Nat Geo’s Nature Photographer of the Year 2017

14 Dec

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

National Geographic has revealed the winners of their annual Nature Photographer of the Year contest, and as usual, every photo from the Grand Prize winner all the way to the Honorable Mentions and People’s Choice awards are fantastic.

The Grand Prize this year—and title of Nature Photographer of the Year—went to Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore, who captured an intense wildlife portrait of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park. The photo, titled “Face to Face in a River in Borneo,” was selected from over 11,000 entries and earns Bojan $ 10,000 in prize money, in addition to his image showing up in an upcoming issue of National Geographic.

Speaking of the moment he captured the shot, Bojan told Nat Geo:

Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.

You can see Bojan’s grand prize winning image, as well as every 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and People’s Choice winner in the slideshow above, or by visiting the National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year website.

Press Release

National Geographic Announces Winners of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

WASHINGTON (Dec. 12, 2017) – Selected from over 11,000 entries, a wildlife photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park has been selected as the grand-prize winner of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The photo, titled “Face to face in a river in Borneo,” was captured by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore. He has won $ 10,000 and will have his winning image published in an upcoming issue of National Geographic magazine and featured on the @NatGeo Instagram account.

Bojan took the winning photo after waiting patiently in the Sekoyner River in Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia. After spending several days on a houseboat photographing orangutans in the park, Bojan learned of a location where a male orangutan had crossed the river –­ unusual behavior that he knew he had to capture. After waiting a day and night near the suspected location, a ranger spotted the orangutan the next morning at a spot a few minutes up the river. As they drew near, Bojan decided to get into the water so the boat did not scare the primate. About five feet deep in a river supposedly home to freshwater crocodiles, Bojan captured the photo when the orangutan peeked out from behind a tree to see if the photographer was still there.

On capturing the photo, Bojan said, “Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.”

Karim Iliya of Haiku, Hawaii, won first place in the Landscapes category for a photo from Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park; Jim Obester of Vancouver, Wash., won first place in the Underwater category for a photo of an anemone; and Todd Kennedy of New South Wales, Australia, won first place in the Aerials category for a photo of a rock pool in Sydney at high tide.

The judges for the contest were National Geographic magazine’s senior photo editor of natural history assignments, Kathy Moran, National Geographic photographer Anand Varma, and photographer Michaela Skovranova.

Contestants submitted photographs in four categories – Wildlife, Landscape, Aerials and Underwater – through National Geographic’s photography community, Your Shot. All of the winning photos, along with the honorable mentions, may be viewed at natgeo.com/photocontest.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Wildlife and Grand Prize Winner

Photo © Jayprakash Joghee Bojan, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A male orangutan peers from behind a tree while crossing a river in Borneo, Indonesia.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Underwater

Photo © Jim Obester, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Jim Obester, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Blue-filtered strobe lights stimulate fluorescent pigments in the clear tentacles of a tube-dwelling anemone in Hood Canal, Washington.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Landscapes

Photo © Karim Iliya, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Karim Iliya, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Shortly before twilight in Kalapana, Hawai’i, a fragment of the cooled lava tube broke away, leaving the molten rock to fan in a fiery spray for less than half an hour before returning to a steady flow.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Aerials

Photo © Todd Kennedy, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Todd Kennedy, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

In Sydney, Australia, the Pacific Ocean at high tide breaks over a natural rock pool enlarged in the 1930s. Avoiding the crowds at the city’s many beaches, a local swims laps.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Wildlife

Photo © Alejandro Prieto, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Alejandro Prieto, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

An adult Caribbean pink flamingo feeds a chick in Yucatán, Mexico. Both parents alternate feeding chicks, at first with a liquid baby food called crop milk, and then with regurgitated food.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Underwater

Photo © Shane Gross, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Shane Gross, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Typically a shy species, a Caribbean reef shark investigates a remote-triggered camera in Cuba’s Gardens of the Queen marine protected area.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Landscapes

Photo © Yuhan Liao, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Yuhan Liao, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Sunlight glances off mineral strata of different colors in Dushanzi Grand Canyon, China.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Aerials

Photo © Takahiro Bessho, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Takahiro Bessho, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Snow-covered metasequoia trees, also called dawn redwoods, interlace over a road in Takashima, Japan.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Wildlife

Photo © Bence Mate, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Bence Mate, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Two grey herons spar as a white-tailed eagle looks on in Hungary.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Underwater

Photo © Michael Patrick O’Neill, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Michael Patrick O’Neill, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Buoyed by the Gulf Stream, a flying fish arcs through the night-dark water five miles off Palm Beach, Florida.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Landscapes

Photo © Mike Olbinski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Mike Olbinski Photography, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A summer thunderstorm unleashes lightning on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Aerials

Photo © Greg C., 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Greg C., 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

On the flanks of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i, the world’s only lava ocean entry spills molten rock into the Pacific Ocean. After erupting in early 2016, the lava flow took about two months to reach the sea, six miles away.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Wildlife

Photo © Harry Collins, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Harry Collins, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A great gray owl swoops to kill in a New Hampshire field.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Underwater

Photo © Matthew Smith, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Matthew Smith, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A Portuguese man-of-war nears the beach on a summer morning; thousands of these jellyfish wash up on Australia’s eastern coast every year.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Landscapes

Photo © Wojciech Kruczynski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Wojciech Kruczy?ski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Sunset illuminates a lighthouse and rainbow in the Faroe Islands.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Aerials

Photo © David Swindler, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by David Swindler, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Green vegetation blooms at the river’s edge, or riparian, zone of a meandering canyon in Utah.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Musician kicks photographer in the face during rock concert, sending her to the ER

12 Dec

Queens of the Stone Age leading man Josh Homme did something at a show last night that seems both willful and horrifying. In the middle of a song, with no reason or provocation, he walked over to photographer Chelsea Lauren and kicked her squarely in the camera and face. Lauren, who was shooting the show for Shutterstock, seems to have been simply doing her job from the pit.

The whole incident was caught on video as well as in photos, with Lauren taking to Instagram to vent her disbelief and ask “WHO DOES THAT?” after the show last night.

Thanks to Josh Homme @queensofthestoneage I now get to spend my night in the ER. Seriously, WHO DOES THAT?!? #joshhomme #queensofthestoneage #qotsa #qotsafamily #concertphotography #musicphotographer

A post shared by Chelsea Lauren (@chelsealaurenla) on

Later, Lauren uploaded a series of three photos from the incident. Two showing the moment right before she was kicked, and a third showing Homme “later after he cut his own face with a knife. I was in the pit in tears – and he just stared at me smiling.”

Thank you everyone that has reached out with supportive messages. A small update, as I’m being flooded with questions: My neck is a sore, my eyebrow bruised and I’m a bit nauseous. The doctor released me early in the morning. Here are three images. Two of them as Josh looked at me, smiled and then kicked me. The other one is later after he cut his own face with a knife. I was in the pit in tears – and he just stared at me smiling. Assault in any form is not okay, no matter what the reasoning. Alcohol and drugs are no excuse. I was where I was allowed to be, I was not breaking any rules. I was simply trying to do my job. I hold nobody accountable for this but Josh himself. KROQ has nothing to do with this and I will always support them. The irony is someone had thrown an ice cube on to the very slick catwalk before the QOTSA set. I was afraid that one of the band members might slip and hurt themselves so, when the lights went dark, I used my arm to wipe down the runway so nobody would hurt themselves. Thank you to @variety for their immediate concern and care with this matter. As of now, nobody from QOTSA has reached out to me. #queensofthestoneage #QOTSA #JoshHomme

A post shared by Chelsea Lauren (@chelsealaurenla) on

Lauren tells Variety that it was “obviously very intentional,” saying later that she spoke out because “I feel like if I don’t do anything, he gets to kick people in the face and not get in trouble because he’s a musician.”

For his part, Homme has since released two apologies. The first, published through the Queens of the Stone Age Twitter account characterized the incident as an accident.

Last night, while in a state of being lost in performance, I kicked over various lighting and equipment on our stage. Today it was brought to my attention that this included a camera held by photographer Chelsea Lauren. I did not mean for that to happen and I am very sorry. I would never intentionally cause harm to anyone working at or attending one of our shows and I hope Chelsea will accept my sincere apology.

But with both photo and video evidence seeming to show that the kick was intentional, this first apology came off more callous than sincere. It was followed by two tearful video apologies posted to Instagram:

Interestingly enough (though, perhaps, not surprising) it seems that other photographers have been warned about Homme in the past. In a post on her Facebook page, photographer Tanya Voltchanskaya said that she was told not to stand in front of Homme during a show back in 2014 because, and here she quotes directly, “[you] will get a boot in the face.”

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Photographer Dad creates epic Star Wars Christmas card for his family

07 Dec

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Photographer Josh Rossi is no stranger to creating epic photography for and of his family. His portraits of his daughter as Wonder Woman swept across the Internet like wildfire, and he’s continued doing amazing work, including this touching series where he transformed disabled kids into Justice League superheroes.

So why did he let some run-of-the-mill “family photographer” take last year’s Christmas pictures for him!?

He didn’t know either. In fact, he felt deeply ashamed by this lapse in judgement, and so he set to work creating something amazing to redeem himself this Holiday season. Cue Star Wars theme.

“I’m a huge Star Wars fan, and my wife has been asking me to do some pictures of us so I went all out this year for our family photos,” Rossi tells DPReview. And by all-out, he means he recreated the Star Wars: The Last Jedi posters featuring himself, his wife, and their two children instead of the lead actors.

“I had such a fun time doing this with my family,” he told us, “especially with my 1 year old.”

Rossi sent over a few behind the scenes images for us (below) and you can see the final shots in the gallery at the top.

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To see more of Rossi’s work, or if you just want to say hello and kudos for another really creative and well-executed project, head over to his website or give him a follow on Instagram and Facebook.


All photographs by Josh Rossi and used with permission.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Photographer sues Bruno Mars for posting childhood photo of himself on Instagram

29 Nov
Photo by Brothers Le, CC-BY-2.0

Singer Bruno Mars recently shared a childhood photo of himself from 1989, and now the photographer behind the photo, Catherine McGann, is suing him for copyright infringement. The image was shared by Mars back in June on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, amassing more than a million ‘likes’ and thousands of comments.

As of this writing, it’s still live on the pop star’s Instagram account:

A post shared by Bruno Mars (@brunomars) on

The lawsuit, which was first surfaced via TMZ, is being leveled against both Mars and record label Warner Music. According to McGann, Mars never asked for permission to share the image on his social media accounts, and the lawsuit seeks any and all profits made from the image’s use, plus damages.

A look at McGann’s Instagram page shows that she posted a version of the image with a copyright notice on November 3rd, 2016.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

28 Nov

Many years ago as I was making a start freelancing, I saw an opportunity to give away my services and a selection of photos by volunteering to cover a community event. Our city administration was hosting a tree planting at our local park, so I went to down with my spade and my camera, to plant some trees and to record the event in pictures. The following day I visited the office of the event organizer and presented them with a selection of prints, (this was back in time when I was only using film.)

Silkworms feeding close up - Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Silkworms feeding on a leaf in northern Thailand.

I enjoyed planting trees. I enjoyed covering the event photographically. And I enjoyed the on-going business relationship that I developed with the city administration as a result of covering their community event and not charging them.

Volunteering has many benefits

If you are just starting out on your photography career, or even if you have no desire to work as a professional photographer, there are a number of benefits to be gained by volunteering your time and skills to the right people or organizations.

A woman prepares raw silk before she spins it in north Thailand. Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

A woman prepares raw silk before she spins it in north Thailand.

Covering a community event was easy and enjoyable for me as I had had years of experience as a newspaper photographer. I knew the style of photos that would be useful and appreciated so it was not difficult to produce them.

Whether you are just starting out as a pro photographer or you just want to help out, producing a series of photos that will be useful for someone else is a great way to stretch you into new photography experiences and help you to develop new skills.

Spinning silk thread by hand - Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Spinning silk thread by hand.

Maybe you are not so confident when photographing strangers. Covering a community event will give you a good reason to go beyond your normal comfort zone, and you may even discover you like it.

Perhaps you have heard of a non-profit wanting some product shots, or a local service club that needs new photos of their executive members. Once you start to look, I am sure you will find plenty of opportunities to offer your services.

Adding red pigment to water for dying thread close up - Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Adding pigment to water for dying thread.

Treat it like a paid gig

Approach your volunteer work as though it is a paid job. Be professional. Clearly communicate your intentions. Listen carefully to the needs of those you are providing the photos for so you can ensure they will be happy with the results and be able to make practical use of the photos you take.

Ask them how they will be using the photos so you have a good idea of what they need. It is no good to give them a series of vertical headshots if they already have horizontal space designed for them on their web page.

Dyed silk thread. Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Dyed silk thread.

Do your best work

Don’ be tempted to produce less than your best because you are not getting paid. It’s always good to do your best work possible. Your reputation is important, especially if you are interested in potential paid work that may come as a result of your volunteering. If you provide photos that are not up to standard you are not likely to be invited back or recommended to other potential clients.

Be pleasant to work with. No one wants a bad experience dealing with a volunteer. People like working with others who make their lives easier. Being professional in your manner and approach to the work, and those organizing it will be beneficial towards future relationships. But choose carefully who you give your time to because occasionally you may come cross someone who wants to exploit your generosity with no concern for you.

Hand winding silk thread in preparation for weaving. Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Hand winding silk thread in preparation for weaving.

Choose who you work with carefully

Some people may struggle to appreciate you are giving your skills and time for free and expect too much from you. If this happens, once you’ve fulfilled what you have said you would do, tactfully back out of a situation that you think is turning sour or if you feel you are being manipulated.

In these circumstances, it’s not likely to turn out well for anyone involved to persevere. Remember, it’s you who are working for free and it is important you have options so you can choose how much and to whom you want to give your work. Be generous, but be generous of your choosing.

Preparing silk thread fo weaving. Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Preparing silk thread for weaving.

Set your expectations reasonably

You will reap what you sow. If you don’t expect anything in return for your volunteered services and you might be pleasantly surprised when something comes back your way in the future.

It may be in the form of paid work for the same organization. It could be from a contact you made during the photography session. A paid job could come from someone who has seen the photos you’ve produced and appreciates your skills.

But to volunteer yourself and then expect something in return is only setting yourself up for disappointment. You will grow as a photographer when you take on situations you might not normally photograph and it’s a good feeling to see your photos being used productively.

Women weaving silk on a traditional loom in northern Thailand. Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer

Women weaving silk on a traditional loom in northern Thailand.

The best thing about giving your service and photos for free is seeing the benefit they receive from them. Giving of what you find enjoyment in is a great reward in itself.

I continue to offer photography and video services for free from time to time as I still enjoy being able to help non-profits and individuals who are helping others. The photos accompanying this article were produced for a non-profit organization here in Thailand who help facilitate a local silk weaving cooperative.

Thai woman working on a traditional loom weaving silk.

Thai woman working on a traditional loom weaving silk.

Have you given back with your photography services?

If you have had experiences, good or bad, in volunteering your photography services please share them in the comments below so others can be encouraged to share their skills too.

The post Why Volunteering is a Great Way to Grow as a Photographer by Kevin Landwer-Johan appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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2017 Buying Guides: Best cameras for every kind of photographer

22 Nov

There’s never been a better time to shop for a new camera, but the number of options available can be overwhelming. In this series of buying guides we’ve provided customized recommendations for several use cases, from shooting landscapes to buying a first camera for a student photographer.

In each of these guides you’ll find one or two main recommendations, and detailed content on several other cameras that deserve your consideration. Our recommendations span product class and cost, but if you’d rather shop by price, click here

If you’re specifically looking for a compact camera, check out our phones, drones and compacts buying guide hub here


Maybe you want better photos in low light. Maybe you’re tired of digital zoom. Whatever the reason, if you’re looking for a capable, beginner-friendly camera to grow and learn with, we’ve got you covered in our guide to best cameras for beginners.

Best cameras for beginners


Quick. Unpredictable. Unwilling to sit still. Kids really are the ultimate test for a camera’s autofocus system. In this guide we’ve compiled a shortlist of what we think are the best options for parents trying to keep up with young kids.

Best cameras for parents


There’s no doubt that the digital revolution made it easier than ever before to pick up a camera and start learning photography. But it hasn’t necessarily gotten easier to choose a first camera. We’re here to help.

Best cameras for students


Whether you’re piling the family in the minivan for a trip to the Magic Kingdom or backpacking through Southeast Asia, you’re going to want to capture the experience with photographs.

Best cameras for travel


Are you a speed freak? Hungry to photograph anything that goes zoom? Or perhaps you just want to get Sports Illustrated level shots of your child’s soccer game. Keep reading to find out which cameras we think are best for sports and action shooting.

Best cameras for sports and action


Video features have become an important factor to many photographers when choosing a new camera. Read on to find out which cameras we think are best for the videophile, at a variety of price points.

Best cameras for video


Landscape photography isn’t as simple as just showing up in front of a beautiful view and taking a couple of pictures. Landscape shooters have a unique set of needs and requirements for their gear, and we’ve selected some of our favorites in this buying guide.

Best cameras for landscapes


Those shooting portraits and weddings need a camera with a decent autofocus system, which won’t give up in low interior lighting. Good image quality at medium/high ISO sensitivity settings is a must, and great colors straight out of the camera will make your life much easier. These days, video is a big deal too. Read on to see which cameras are best suited to those tasks.

Best cameras for people and events

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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