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Posts Tagged ‘just’

Godox XPro-N wireless flash trigger for Nikon boasts TTL, HSS and more for just $70

18 Oct

Godox has launched a Nikon version of the XPro-C 2.4GHz wireless flash trigger it announced for Canon last month. The new model—aptly titled the XPro-N—is equipped to control Godox’s X1 system, and is currently listed by online retailers as available for pre-order with shipping planned to start on October 31st.

This Nikon version will be joined by models for Sony, Fujifilm, and MFT throughout the remainder of the year.

As with the Canon version, the new XPro-N model sports a large dot-matrix LCD alongside five physical buttons. The display shows five groups, one group per physical button, as well as data pertaining to each group. The trigger supports HSS (up to 1/8000), TTL, and manual (1/1 – 1/256) control. There’s also support for TTL-Convert-Manual (TCM) functionality, which allows you to meter flashes in TTL, then switching to manual mode with the settings automatically adjusting to keep an equivalent output.

The XPro-N is listed for pre-order at $ 70 on Amazon.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Shooting with a used DSLR kit that cost me just $80

14 Oct

Cameras and lenses are expensive. Really expensive. Even the cheapest entry-level DSLR kit today costs $ 500 and upwards. But what if you would buy the cheapest possible used DSLR? A camera that is over 10 years old? How would it stack up against today’s modern cameras? I was curious about this, and decided to find out for myself.

After two weeks of watching classified ads closely, and missing a couple of good bargains because I wasn’t fast enough, I finally managed to purchase a Canon 400D(also known as Rebel XTi) with a battery grip and a Canon 50mm f1.8 II lens on it. All this for only $ 80. It seemed like a great deal to me. It even came with a 2GB CF card!

I took the camera for a long walk the same day I bought it, and to summarize my experience: I was amazed by how good it was!

The sensor outputs 10 megapixel photos, meaning that they measure roughly 3900×2600 pixels. This is more than enough for posting on social media or viewing photos on a computer screen. And what amazed me even more, was that with a fairly good lens, which the Canon 50mm F1.8 is, these pixels get utilized very well. A 100% crop looks very crisp and sharp in most cases.

See the video above for image samples and 100% crop examples.

The only major downside with using an 11-year-old camera is that the dynamic range in the sensor falls far short of my modern Sony A7. If you do not nail the exposure really well when you take the photo, you have far less latitude to correct it later. With my modern cameras I just shoot everything slightly underexposed, and lift the exposure later in Lightroom. That would not be a good idea with the Canon 400D.

This camera’s weak dynamic range also makes it hard to capture scenes with strong light and deep shadows in the same frame. But other than that, this $ 80 camera kit has already, after a couple of days, given me a lot of photography joy for the money. I will definitely keep this camera—it’s a fun tool to take out once in a while to add some variation to my photo walks.

This little experiment taught me that if you just want a good camera to take nice looking photos in your everyday life, and you don’t have professional needs (such as 50 megapixel files) $ 80 will take you surprisingly far. And as an added benefit, 10 megapixel files give you such a swift and fast editing experience in Lightroom!


Micael Widell is a photography enthusiast based in Stockholm, Sweden. He loves photography, and runs a YouTube channel with tutorials, lens reviews and photography inspiration. You can also find him as @mwroll on Instagram and 500px.

This article was originally published on Micael’s blog, and is being republished in full with express permission.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Adobe just made it way easier to import Lightroom collections into Adobe Portfolio

11 Oct

Adobe has announced that Portfolio, its online website publishing service for CC customers, has a new integration with Lightroom that lets users import their collections and add photos to their website with next-to-no effort.

As of this new update, a users’ Lightroom content will simply show up within Portfolio’s ‘Manage Content’ section under the ‘Integrations’ tab. From there, users are able to choose any of their Lightroom Collections to import to a Page on Portfolio. When added to the website, Adobe says the full Collection appears as a new Page with a photo grid, which you can then customize by removing images and/or rearranging the grid. Other elements, such as text and videos, can also be added to the page.

Finally, Adobe also says that Portfolio will now automatically import new Behance projects to new Pages within a chosen gallery—assuming the user chooses a default import gallery and has their Adobe ID associated with a Behance account.

Imported content is tagged with either a Lightroom or Behance badge in the Manage Content section to show where it was imported from.

To learn more about these new features or give them a try for yourself, head over to the Adobe Creative Cloud blog or download the latest version of Portfolio and give Lightroom import a shot for yourself.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Make a Macro Lens with Just a Drop of Water

27 Sep

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Posted in Equipment

 

Challenge: Shooting portraits using just an iPhone, a flashlight, and a Big Mac box

30 Aug

Great gear can make a big difference when it comes to the quality of your photographs, but we all know that good gear does not a great photographer make. What’s more, a great photographer can do amazing things using really mediocre equipment.

Case in point: watch portrait photographer Philippe Echaroux take on what he’s calling “Big Mac Portrait Challenge.”

Usually Echaroux uses Hasselblad digital cameras, Elinchrom lights and other expensive (for a reason) equipment to capture his professional portrait work. But he was recently asked to make due without any of that; instead, he would be using an iPhone for shooting and retouching, a small flashlight, and a Big Mac box from McDonald’s. Yeah… seriously.

The final shots benefit from a lot of post-processing, of course. In all, Echaroux used VSCO, Photoshop Fix, and Lightroom Mobile to tease out something that looks a lot more professional than you’d expect from his meager setup. But The basic gear and lighting was all the same: iPhone, flashlight, Big Mac box.

Whether you’re shooting an astronaut in a darkened Soyuz capsule with a 10-year-old DSLR and an iPhone flashlight, or taking the so-called Big Mac Portrait Challenge, don’t let lack of gear intimidate you. If nothing else, it might lead to a cool story or creative video.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Leica unveils M Monochrom Oslo Edition, limited to just 10 units

29 Aug

The Leica Store in Oslo has announced a special edition Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) camera simply called the Oslo Edition. This model is offered exclusively by the Leica Store Oslo, and though it is available worldwide, the edition is limited to just 10 units—this might be your best chance to get an ultra-rare Leica at a not-totally-insane price.

Both the camera body and the lens are engraved with the word ‘OSLO’ and a unit number ranging from 1 to 10. In addition to the special engraving and edition numbers, the Leica M Oslo Edition is shipped with a Leica Summaron-M 28mm F5.6 lens sporting a unique black finish.

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The special edition is packed in a gift box containing the lens, a battery, battery charger, and a Certificate of Authenticity. The Oslo Edition is available to purchase now for Kr. 118,000 / $ 14,800 USD. In other words: approximately double the cost of the regular Leica M Monochrom Typ 246.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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NASA just ordered 53 Nikon D5 DSLRs for the ISS and training purposes

27 Aug

NASA’s relationship with Nikon is as strong as ever, judging by the fact that the space agency just placed a massive order for 53 Nikon D5 DSLRs.

According to Nikon, NASA ordered the cameras as-is (no hardware modifications) and plans to use them for photography on the International Space Station, as well as astronaut training on Earth. The agency might make some changes down the line, but for now there’s no difference between the D5 cameras available to consumers and the ones being shipped to NASA.

This is the latest development in a long-running relationship between NASA and Nikon, which has provided the space agency with camera gear as far back as 1971 for the Apollo 15 space mission.

Most recently, Nikon provided NASA with 38 units of the Nikon D4 DSLR in 2013 and another 10 units of the D4 in 2016. The camera maker didn’t reveal whether NASA received any special discounts on its bulk order, but assuming NASA paid retail price, the cost could have exceeded $ 344,000 USD.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Cylinder House: This Residence is Just a Cluster of Glass Tubes

11 Aug

[ By SA Rogers in Architecture & Houses & Residential. ]

You know those glass tubes at the bank drive-through that shoot your deposits and withdrawals back and forth between you and the tellers? This house is like living in a cluster of them. Sadly, they’re not full of money, but it’s still pretty cool. ‘Cylinder House’ by lead architect Cyril Lancelin of the firm Town and Concrete is a modular glass residence in Lyon, France that can easily be expanded and rearranged without disturbing the trees around it by adding or subtracting one glass tube at a time.

Set on plinths, the tubes are narrow enough to allow for optimal malleability, conforming to the site. Some are taller than others, and some seem to hover above the landscape. The tubes can be fully open to each other, partially open or closed off altogether for smaller spaces. There are no walls or hallways inside other than the curving glass.

“The furniture marks space, but its movement can reinvent the house,” say the architects. “The plan is not fixed, to follow the evolution of the lives of these occupants. From the outside, the facades undulate… this system of cylinder juxtaposition allows to enlarge the house but also to have a blurred outer delimitation of the house with its context.”

The effect is definitely unusual when viewing the house from outside. As modular designs become more popular, their inventiveness only increases. It’ll be interesting to see how architecture as a whole is affected by the trend in the coming years.

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[ By SA Rogers in Architecture & Houses & Residential. ]

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Posted in Creativity

 

Amazon sells an AmazonBasics flash for Canon and Nikon DSLRs for just $28

09 Aug

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If you’re looking to get into artificial lighting for dirt cheap, there’s a new ‘most affordable’ option in town. It turns out Amazon sells what looks to be a clone of the already cheap (~$ 70) Godox VT560 for the rock bottom price of just 28 bucks through the AmazonBasics brand.

PetaPixel spotted the speedlight earlier today, and the response has been pretty positive so far. Sure, the “AmazonBasics Electronic Flash for DSLR Cameras” can’t be radio triggered and doesn’t feature useful options like TTL metering, but at $ 28 nobody in their right mind would expect it to.

Instead, what you’re getting is a Canon and Nikon compatible speedlight with three modes (Manual, Slave 1, Slave 2), PC sync port for firing your flash off-camera without a master, 8 levels of power control, and a guide number of 33. Reviews so far are decent at an average of 3.9 our of 5 stars, with some calling the flash “unbeatable for the money,” although at least one reviewer said the flash failed on-location after working fine at home.

To find out more about the ultra-affordable speedlight, or if you want to pick it up for yourself, click here.


*FULL DISCLOSURE: dpreview.com is a wholly-owned but editorially independent subsidiary of Amazon.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Video: Professional fashion model hits 30 poses in just 15 seconds

25 Jul

If you’re a fashion model working with Taobao, an Chinese online retailer a la Amazon, your photographer expects some next-level posing from you. In this video posted by the Facebook page Shanghai Expat, we get to see what this looks like in real life: 30 poses hit in just 15 seconds of shooting.

Rapid-fire posing is nothing new, but it’s still hard to believe that each one of these split-second poses turns into a different look option for a catalog. Over the course of a day’s shooting, these models will reportedly pose up to 150 outfits, taking just one minute to change outfits and a 10-minute lunch break.

At that pace, we’re not entirely sure how the photographer is keeping up. Have you ever had the opportunity to work with a model at this skill level? What was it like? Tell us in the comments.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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