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Getty Images and Instagram announce grant winners

22 Sep

Getty Images Instagram Grant Winners Announced

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Getty Images and Instagram have announced the winners of the second annual Getty Images Instagram Grant, a program founded to support photographers using Instagram to document stories from underrepresented communities around the world.

The three winners will receive grants of $ 10,000 and will also have their work exhibited at the Photoville photography festival in New York from September 21-25. Click through to learn about the recipients and to see their winning images.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Christian Rodriguez, a documentary photographer from Uruguay, received a grant for his project Teen Mom, which depicts teen pregnancy in Latin America. Directly impacted by teenage motherhood, Christian hopes to raise awareness of the issue and highlight its impact on local communities. He finds inspiration in the literary trend of magical realism and considers Instagram a powerful tool to gain feedback and information about the realities many teenagers are faced with.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Portrait of Graciela (13) , Norma (8) and Lupita (7) hiding behind their house in a small village called Ocotal Grande in Veracruz. They belong to the popoluca community. Popoluca is a Nahuatl term (meaning “gibberish, unintelligible speech”) given to various indigenous communities of southeastern Veracruz.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Gloria (13) belongs to the Mixe Community of Maluco, a small village in the north of the “Itsmo de Tehuantepec”, Oaxaca. She lives with her mother and 8 of her 10 siblings, who are between 4 and 20 years old. Gloria became mother at the age of 12, consequence of the constant sexual abuse of her father who has also attacked two of her sisters, aged 8 and 16.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Angela Mieres (15) hugs her sister Patricia during labor. Her boyfriend and father of the baby was shot dead 20 days before birth.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Micaela and her son, Franco. Micaela’s mother was, like her, a teenage mother.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Children wait for their parents to return from work, both of whom are coal pickers inside a coal mine in Jharia.

Ronny Sen, from India, received a grant for his work documenting the fires that have burned for just over one hundred years in mineral-rich Jharia. A documentary photographer compelled to visually document his immediate reality, Ronny’s work uses both photography and videography to spotlight the plight of people who have been affected by big corporations and depicts survival in an apocalyptic-like landscape.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

The wall of a broken temple in a village near a coal mine in Jharia. Due to the blasting and the underground fire lots of the buildings and houses in nearby villages are being destroyed.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

A contractual labour inside one of the coal mines in Jharia. He will make two dollars after loading almost five trucks with coal in Jharia.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Coal scavengers work very early in the morning before the mine officials come inside the mines in Jharia.

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Girma Berta resides in Addis Ababa and uses his iPhone to capture the vibrant color and grunge of street life in the capital of Ethiopia. Girma uses his background in graphics and painting as a guide for lighting and composition, playing with colors and infusing street photography with fine art. Girma’s project, Moving Shadows, showcases local street scenes against backdrops of color. A member of @everydayafrica, he uses Instagram as a platform for self-expression and to share his work with the rest of the world. 

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty Images asks court to throw out $1B lawsuit

14 Sep

Getty Images has responded to the $ 1 billion lawsuit filed against it by photographer Carol Highsmith, arguing that she can no longer make copyright claims about the photos because they have been entered into the public domain. According to reports from the AP, the company further argues that it has done nothing wrong by offering licenses of the images because ‘public domain works are routinely commercialized…’ Getty points toward Shakespeare plays and Dickens novels sold by publishers as examples.

The issue revolves around the lawsuit filed in late July alleging that a Getty subsidiary has been issuing notices that demand licensing fees for Highsmith’s images. Those notices are at odds with the public domain status of the works and, according to the lawsuit, have caused damage to Highsmith’s reputation. Highsmith’s lawsuit also alleges that Getty and its subsidiaries falsely represented themselves as the copyright owners, which Highsmith’s lawyers argue violates provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

In its response to the lawsuit’s DMCA claims, Getty says it has committed no such violations, because doing so would have required ‘intent to induce, enable, facilitate, or conceal infringement.’ Because the photos are in the public domain, Getty argues that it ‘could not have acted with the requisite intent or knowledge of infringement.’

Ultimately, Getty has asked the court to dismiss Highsmith’s lawsuit against it, also stating that it has not violated the state laws alleged in the lawsuit and that other other legal claims are unfounded. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty Images Reportage shifts from editorial to commercial focus

03 Sep
Getty Images Reportage has gained a reputation for photojournalism and covering important issues.

Getty Images has reportedly communicated a change in strategy for Getty Images Reportage. Launched in 2007, Reportage represented top photojournalists, as well as emerging photographers, with a focus on in-depth features that addressed important issues and stories. Some of these have included the Haiti earthquake, the war in Afghanistan, Nigerian and Somali pirates, and the nuclear legacy of Northeast Kazakhstan.

The company announced that as of October, Reportage will no longer represent its photographers for editorial assignments. In its place, Getty will back a new commercial agency called Verbatim, which will represent Reportage’s photographers to commercial clients instead. According to the report in TIME, Reportage will keep its Emerging Talent program, but will become mainly an archive following the transition.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty employs robots for underwater shots in Rio

13 Aug

Prior to the start of the games in Rio we got a glimpse of the gear that Getty photographers are using to cover the Olympics. This week, we’ve seen a couple more of the tools the organization is using – a pair of robotic underwater camera housings. 

Veteran Getty photographer Al Bello talks about using the robotic camera housing with CNN Money, and says that they give an obvious advantage over the static underwater systems that they’ve used in the past. The robotic system allows him to pan, tilt and zoom a Canon EOS-1D X II enclosed safely in the housing as athletes pass by overhead, eliminating the guesswork that the static system required. 

You can see more of Bello’s work above and below the water in Rio by following him on Twitter and Instagram.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty Images sued again, this time by Zuma Press

05 Aug

Getty Images has been sued again, this time by independent press agency Zuma Press over the alleged copyright infringement of 47,048 of its sports images. According to the lawsuit, Getty Images copied the aforementioned photos in April 2016 and made them available on its own website for both selling and licensing purposes without permission. The legal claim further states that Getty ‘altered/removed Zuma’s credit and replaced it with its own credit.’

The lawsuit, which was filed August 1 in the US District Court of the Southern District of New York, claims that, ‘Getty has been carelessly and recklessly acquiring content, not doing due diligence and not taking adequate measures to prevent infringement as well as falsifying/removing proper copyright management information… Getty has shown that it cannot and will not reform on its own accord.’

The lawsuit is seeking damages plus profits or, alternatively, statutory damages that can range from $ 2,500 to $ 25,000 per infringed photograph.

This is the second copyright infringement lawsuit filed against Getty Images in recent days. On July 25, photographer Carol M. Highsmith filed a suit against Getty for $ 1 billion over its alleged infringement of her photographers. In response, Getty said the lawsuit was based on ‘misconceptions.’

Via: Ars Technica

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty Images says $1 billion lawsuit is based on ‘misconceptions’

02 Aug

On July 25, photographer Carol M. Highsmith filed a lawsuit against Getty Images seeking $ 1 billion in damages over the company’s alleged infringement of her photo copyrights. The lawsuit names both Getty Images and distributor Alamy, claiming both have been charging licensing fees for the use of photos she provided to the Library of Congress for public use. The suit also names LCS, which it claims is owned by or operated under common control with Getty. In a response to the lawsuit, Getty said, ‘We believe it is based on a number of misconceptions.’

In its statement, Getty Images distances itself from the copyright infringement claim, stating that LCS was acting on behalf of Alamy.

The content in question has been part of the public domain for many years. It is standard practice for image libraries to distribute and provide access to public domain content, and it is important to note that distributing and providing access to public domain content is different to asserting copyright ownership of it.

LCS works on behalf of content creators and distributors to protect them against the unauthorized use of their work. In this instance, LCS pursued an infringement on behalf of its customer, Alamy. Any enquiries regarding that matter should be directed to Alamy; however, as soon as the plaintiff contacted LCS, LCS acted swiftly to cease its pursuit with respect to the image provided by Alamy and notified Alamy it would not pursue this content.

The company also said that, assuming it can’t ‘rectify’ the situation with Highsmith, ‘we will defend ourselves vigorously.’

Via: Getty Images

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty Images sued for $1 billion over alleged copyright infringement

29 Jul
Photographer Carol Highsmith with her Phase One camera. Photo via The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photographer Carol M. Highsmith is suing Getty Images for $ 1 billion over its alleged copyright infringement of 18,755 of her photos. The lawsuit, which was filed in a New York federal court on July 25, alleges that Getty Images has been charging fees to license her images without her permission – the same images she has provided to the Library of Congress for free use by the public. In addition to distributing her images, the lawsuit alleges that Getty did not give Highsmith proper credit for her photos.

The legal claim alleges statutory damages at up to $ 468,875,000. But because of a ruling against Getty in Morel v. Getty, a previous copyright case, the damages can reportedly be tripled to deter ‘bad faith business practices’. Highsmith became aware of Getty’s alleged copyright infringement after, she says, it sent her a letter accusing her of infringing the copyright of her own photograph by posting it on her own non-profit organization’s website.

The claim states, in part, ‘The defendants have apparently misappropriated Ms. Highsmith’s generous gift to the American people. [Getty Images and subsidiaries] are not only unlawfully charging licensing fees… but are falsely and fraudulently holding themselves out as the exclusive copyright owner.” The lawsuit also claims Highsmith’s reputation has suffered a serious blow as a result of Getty’s alleged actions. 

Via: PDNPulse, Hyperallergic

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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This is what it looks like when Getty prepares for the Olympics

26 Jul

Michael Heiman, Getty’s Director of Global Event Operations, has his work cut out for him in Rio. He’s been posting photos to his Instagram account showing the work going on behind the scenes as his team prepares to cover the Summer Olympics. From the not-so-glamorous task of installing cables, to the confusion caused when he wore a green shirt to a local hardware store, his posts have offered a fascinating look at what it takes to cover a colossal event like the Olympics.

And of course, there’s the gear. Observe:

 

It takes a lot gear to cover the Olympics. This is just some of our lens…. #mygettyriooffice #rio2016 #cps #thankscanon #lotsofglass

A photo posted by Michael Heiman (@heiman225) on

But what about the camera bodies? Glad you asked.

 

You obviously need some camera bodies to go with all that glass. #rio2016 #mygettyriooffice #gearporn #lotsofcameras #eos1dxmarkii #cps #canon #thankscanon #gettysport

A photo posted by Michael Heiman (@heiman225) on

Not surprisingly, the table is loaded with Canon EOS-1D X Mark I and II bodies, with a couple of 5DSR bodies for good measure, and L-series glass as far as the eye can see. Just another day at the office, right?

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty Images launches ‘Virtual Reality Group’, adds 12,000 360° images

10 Jun

Getty Images has announced the launch of the Getty Images Virtual Reality Group – a new business division ‘dedicated to the creation and global distribution’ of VR content. At launch, the new group offers a library of more than 12,000 360-degree VR images, as well as ultra high-resolution ‘Gigapixel’ imagery from major events. 

Getty Images has announced the creation of a dedicated Virtual Reality Group, which will offer more than 12,000 360-degree and ‘Gigapixel’ images at launch.

According to Dawn Airey, CEO of Getty Images: ‘The technology is still in its infancy – as are the business models addressing how to use it – but […] we are only on the cusp of what will be a tectonic plate shift in VR’.

Although Getty Images started adding VR and Gigapixel imagery to its collection several years ago, the launch of a dedicated business division is the latest sign that the photography industry is taking VR very seriously indeed. What do you think? Let us know. 


Press Release:

The launch of the Getty Images Virtual Reality Group brings high quality VR and 360 content to everyone, satisfying the growing appetite for immersive content

Getty Images, the world leader in visual communication, has today announced the launch of the Getty Images Virtual Reality Group, a new business dedicated to the creation and global distribution of virtual reality (VR) content.

The Getty Images Virtual Reality Group brings the very latest in photographic and video technology together with Getty Images’ 21 years of experience in visual storytelling, to offer exceptional content for existing and future VR platforms. The Group provides a comprehensive offering of over 12,000 premium 360 images with new content added daily, as well as high res gigapixel content from key events and venues. High quality VR production is also being offered through Getty Images Assignments.

Quick to adapt to new image technologies, Getty images began building its collection of 360 and gigapixel imagery four years ago, pioneering the use of these techniques in its role as the Official Photographic Agency for the International Olympic Committee at the 2012 London Olympics. Fast track to today, and every Getty Images photographer at the upcoming Rio Olympic Games, will be equipped with a 360 camera. This is just one example of how Getty Images is utilizing its expertise, its access to over 130,000 annual news, sport and entertainment events and its unique relationships to generate high-end VR content, and feed the growing demand for a more immersive visual experience.

“The technology is still in its infancy – as are the business models addressing how to use it – but we can expect to see VR become a leading tool for visual storytelling. It is anticipated that over 14 million consoles will sell this year alone (TrendForce), and we are only on the cusp of what will be a tectonic plate shift in VR” said Dawn Airey, Chief Executive Officer of Getty Images.

Airey continues: “With the launch of the Getty Images Virtual Reality Group, we are embedding VR content technologies into the core of our business and ensuring that, as use of VR continues to grow, its users are further enhancing their experience with access to the world’s best imagery.”

“The diverse range of 360 degree content that we produce – from the red carpet to the stadiums of the world’s biggest sporting events and the frontline of conflict – allows people to access information and experiences that were previously off limits,” said Hugh Pinney, Vice President of Editorial Content at Getty Images. “Virtual Reality is completely transforming the way we view and experience world events.”

The Group will continue to build on Getty Images existing VR content offering, which includes 360 content captured by its award-winning news, sport and entertainment photographers as well as geo-located, interactive panoramic images from its content partner 360cities.net.

Last month, Getty Images and Google announced their latest partnership, which sees Getty Images supplying hi-res VR content from current events around the world for Google Expeditions. Getty Images partnered with Oculus Rift in June 2015 to make its 360 imagery available for users of the Oculus platform via its 360° View by Getty Images collection.

For more information, visit http://wherewestand.gettyimages.com/virtualrealitygroup.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Getty accuses Google of anti-competition practices, files complaint in EU

30 Apr
Ian Walton / Getty Images

Getty Images, one of the largest photo agencies in the world, has filed a complaint with the European Union’s Competition Commission because Google won’t budge on making high resolution photographs freely available from its Images search engine. Getty says that as users can see images in high resolution via the results window in Google Images there is no incentive for searchers to click through to the owner’s website. Getty maintains that the practice of showing searched images at high resolution deprives websites of traffic, while also making it easier for Google users to download and use images without paying a license fee to the copyright owner.

In an open letter posted on the Getty Image’s website, the companys General Counsel, Yoko Miyashita, says ‘Our complaint focuses specifically on changes made to Google Images in 2013, which have impacted the competitiveness of our business by siphoning off traffic and promoting piracy – to the detriment of the 200,000 contributors who rely on us to earn a living. On a broader scale, this has impacted the interests of content creators around the world, allowing Google not only to profit from their work, but also to reinforce its role as the internet’s dominant search engine and thus maintain its monopoly power.’

The changes Miyashita mentions, that were made in January 2013, are those which saw Google shift from serving searchers a thumbnail sized image to allowing users to see and download full-sized images. The service even allows users to specify the size of image they want to see. Getty argues ‘Once an image is displayed in high-resolution, large format, it is immediately consumed – there’s very little reason to go see it somewhere else. This format change immediately diverted traffic away from Getty Images, and from the websites of Getty Images’ customers and those of other image creators, deterring users from leaving Google’s platform to engage with content through legitimate sources. This, in turn, negatively impacts content creators’ ability to monetize users’ interest through licensing and advertising, and reduces the level of reinvestment available for the creation of new content.’

Getty says it has been in talks with Google for three years, but that Google’s attitude has been that image creators should either accept the search engine’s terms or opt-out of image search. Getty says it is fighting to protect its interests and those of its contributors, but also to protect the entire image-making industry.

Getty’s complaint is part of a wider investigation of Google by the European Competition Commission in which the search giant faces questions about restrictive practices in the way it serves search results as well as the compulsory apps that come with devices using the Android operating system.

For more information, and to read Yoko Miyashita’s open letter, see the Advocacy page on the Getty Images website. 


Press release:

Getty Images to file competition law complaint against Google

Getty Images, a world leader in visual communications, will today file a competition law complaint against Google Inc. with the European Commission. The complaint follows on from Getty Images’ submission in June 2015, when it joined as an interested third party in support of the European Commission’s existing investigation into Google’s anti-competitive business practices. 

The Commission’s current proceedings against Google are wide-reaching, with Google accused of distorting search results in favour of its own services. This affects a myriad of industries, from media companies like Getty Images, to comparison shopping and travel websites. Just last week, a further set of proceedings were issued against the search engine, to address Google’s business practices around its Android mobile operating system.

Getty Images’ complaint focuses specifically on changes made in 2013 to Google Images, the image search functionality of Google, which has not only impacted Getty Images’ image licensing business, but content creators around the world, by creating captivating galleries of high-resolution, copyrighted content. Because image consumption is immediate, once an image is displayed in high-resolution, large format, there is little impetus to view the image on the original source site. These changes have allowed Google to reinforce its role as the internet’s dominant search engine, maintaining monopoly over site traffic, engagement data and advertising spend. This has also promoted piracy, resulting in widespread copyright infringement, turning users into accidental pirates.

Getty Images’ General Counsel, Yoko Miyashita says: ‘Getty Images represents over 200,000 photojournalists, content creators and artists around the world who rely on us to protect their ability to be compensated for their work. Google’s behavior is adversely affecting not only our contributors, but the lives and livelihoods of artists around the word – present and future. By standing in the way of a fair marketplace for images, Google is threatening innovation, and jeopardizing artists’ ability to fund the creation of important future works. Artists need to earn a living in order to sustain creativity and licensing is paramount to this; however, this cannot happen if Google is siphoning traffic and creating an environment where it can claim the profits from individuals’ creations as its own.’

Miyashita continues: ‘Getty Images believes that images have the power to move the world by spurring action and driving change. It is key that these issues with Google are addressed and that the dominant search engine in Europe leads users to legitimate sources for imagery, rather than creating an environment that benefits Google alone. A fair marketplace will allow photographers to continue to capture the ground-breaking imagery that informs and impacts the world every day.’

Getty Images firmly supports a more image-rich, digital world, but one that recognizes and remunerates the content creators who create this imagery. In 2014, Getty Images launched its embed tool, which revolutionized the visual content industry by making imagery available for easy, legal sharing at no cost for non-commercial use. This embed functionality provides consumers with an easy, legal alternative to the ‘right click,’ an alternative that ensures the content creator is appropriately credited for their work and that the image is clearly traceable to Getty Images in the event that a user wishes to license the image for a commercial purpose.

Visit Where We Stand  to learn more about how Getty Images is working with policy makers and industry groups to defend intellectual property and ensure a fair marketplace for content creators.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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