RSS
 

Posts Tagged ‘Getty’

Google strikes deal with Getty, will remove direct image links from search

13 Feb

Getty Images has announced a licensing deal with Google that resolves a 2016 lawsuit filed by the photo agency against the Internet giant. The lawsuit accused Google of “promoting piracy” by linking to high-resolution copyrighted images without watermarks, enabling anyone to save and use the images without paying the related fee.

At the heart of the issue was Google Image Search, and how it directly links to high-resolution images found in articles and other online destinations. Because the high-resolution images could be readily found on Google Images, users had little motivation to hunt down the proper image source. This resulted in many “accidental pirates” infringing image copyrights, the lawsuit claims.

To settle the matter, Getty and Google have jointly announced a new multi-year agreement last week, with Getty’s CEO Dawn Airey explaining that Getty “will license our market leading content to Google, working closely with them to improve attribution of our contributors’ work and thereby growing the ecosystem.” That, unfortunately, is as far as official details go.

Fortunately, The Verge elaborated on the agreement, reporting that Google will start removing direct links to image URLs and more prominently displaying copyright disclaimer—good news for all photographers and photo agencies, assuming this practice will go beyond images licensed by Getty.

Getty Images has formally withdrawn its legal complaint against Google.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Google strikes deal with Getty, will remove direct image links from search

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images bans Photoshopping models to look thinner thanks to French law

27 Sep

In 2015, France passed a law that will require some commercial images with a digitally retouched model to have a label notifying viewers about the alterations. That requirement will be effective starting October 1st, 2017, and Getty Images is preparing for that day with a policy change of its own.

Announced in an email that DPReview has acquired from a reader, Getty has updated its Creative Stills Submission Requirements to specify that it will no longer accept images of models whose bodies have been edited to look either thinner or larger.

The law doesn’t extend to minor digital edits, such as fixing skin blemishes, altering hair color, or altering nose shape; however, edits that change a model’s body shape require a disclosure. In response, Getty Images says that starting October 1st, photographers may not “submit to us any creative content depicting models whose body shapes have been retouched to make them look thinner or larger.”

Submitting this type of altered image will result in the photographer breaching both submission guidelines and their agreement with the company, Getty warns. The same change applies to iStock submissions, as well.

Magazines and other entities in France that use these altered photos without proper disclosure face a fine of up to €37,500 (~$ 45,000 USD).


DPReview has reached out to Getty Images for comment on the policy change, as well as clarification about how broad this change is, and what the company intends to do about the altered images already in its catalog. We will update the post if and when we hear back.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images bans Photoshopping models to look thinner thanks to French law

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images and Instagram announce grant winners

22 Sep

Getty Images Instagram Grant Winners Announced

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Getty Images and Instagram have announced the winners of the second annual Getty Images Instagram Grant, a program founded to support photographers using Instagram to document stories from underrepresented communities around the world.

The three winners will receive grants of $ 10,000 and will also have their work exhibited at the Photoville photography festival in New York from September 21-25. Click through to learn about the recipients and to see their winning images.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Christian Rodriguez, a documentary photographer from Uruguay, received a grant for his project Teen Mom, which depicts teen pregnancy in Latin America. Directly impacted by teenage motherhood, Christian hopes to raise awareness of the issue and highlight its impact on local communities. He finds inspiration in the literary trend of magical realism and considers Instagram a powerful tool to gain feedback and information about the realities many teenagers are faced with.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Portrait of Graciela (13) , Norma (8) and Lupita (7) hiding behind their house in a small village called Ocotal Grande in Veracruz. They belong to the popoluca community. Popoluca is a Nahuatl term (meaning “gibberish, unintelligible speech”) given to various indigenous communities of southeastern Veracruz.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Gloria (13) belongs to the Mixe Community of Maluco, a small village in the north of the “Itsmo de Tehuantepec”, Oaxaca. She lives with her mother and 8 of her 10 siblings, who are between 4 and 20 years old. Gloria became mother at the age of 12, consequence of the constant sexual abuse of her father who has also attacked two of her sisters, aged 8 and 16.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Angela Mieres (15) hugs her sister Patricia during labor. Her boyfriend and father of the baby was shot dead 20 days before birth.

Christian Rodriguez

Photo by Christian Rodriguez, @christian_foto, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Micaela and her son, Franco. Micaela’s mother was, like her, a teenage mother.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Children wait for their parents to return from work, both of whom are coal pickers inside a coal mine in Jharia.

Ronny Sen, from India, received a grant for his work documenting the fires that have burned for just over one hundred years in mineral-rich Jharia. A documentary photographer compelled to visually document his immediate reality, Ronny’s work uses both photography and videography to spotlight the plight of people who have been affected by big corporations and depicts survival in an apocalyptic-like landscape.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

The wall of a broken temple in a village near a coal mine in Jharia. Due to the blasting and the underground fire lots of the buildings and houses in nearby villages are being destroyed.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

A contractual labour inside one of the coal mines in Jharia. He will make two dollars after loading almost five trucks with coal in Jharia.

Ronny Sen

Photo by Ronny Sen, @ronnysen, @whatdoestheendoftimelooklike, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Coal scavengers work very early in the morning before the mine officials come inside the mines in Jharia.

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Girma Berta resides in Addis Ababa and uses his iPhone to capture the vibrant color and grunge of street life in the capital of Ethiopia. Girma uses his background in graphics and painting as a guide for lighting and composition, playing with colors and infusing street photography with fine art. Girma’s project, Moving Shadows, showcases local street scenes against backdrops of color. A member of @everydayafrica, he uses Instagram as a platform for self-expression and to share his work with the rest of the world. 

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Girma Berta

Photo by Girma Berta, @gboxcreative, Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images and Instagram announce grant winners

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images asks court to throw out $1B lawsuit

14 Sep

Getty Images has responded to the $ 1 billion lawsuit filed against it by photographer Carol Highsmith, arguing that she can no longer make copyright claims about the photos because they have been entered into the public domain. According to reports from the AP, the company further argues that it has done nothing wrong by offering licenses of the images because ‘public domain works are routinely commercialized…’ Getty points toward Shakespeare plays and Dickens novels sold by publishers as examples.

The issue revolves around the lawsuit filed in late July alleging that a Getty subsidiary has been issuing notices that demand licensing fees for Highsmith’s images. Those notices are at odds with the public domain status of the works and, according to the lawsuit, have caused damage to Highsmith’s reputation. Highsmith’s lawsuit also alleges that Getty and its subsidiaries falsely represented themselves as the copyright owners, which Highsmith’s lawyers argue violates provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

In its response to the lawsuit’s DMCA claims, Getty says it has committed no such violations, because doing so would have required ‘intent to induce, enable, facilitate, or conceal infringement.’ Because the photos are in the public domain, Getty argues that it ‘could not have acted with the requisite intent or knowledge of infringement.’

Ultimately, Getty has asked the court to dismiss Highsmith’s lawsuit against it, also stating that it has not violated the state laws alleged in the lawsuit and that other other legal claims are unfounded. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images asks court to throw out $1B lawsuit

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images Reportage shifts from editorial to commercial focus

03 Sep
Getty Images Reportage has gained a reputation for photojournalism and covering important issues.

Getty Images has reportedly communicated a change in strategy for Getty Images Reportage. Launched in 2007, Reportage represented top photojournalists, as well as emerging photographers, with a focus on in-depth features that addressed important issues and stories. Some of these have included the Haiti earthquake, the war in Afghanistan, Nigerian and Somali pirates, and the nuclear legacy of Northeast Kazakhstan.

The company announced that as of October, Reportage will no longer represent its photographers for editorial assignments. In its place, Getty will back a new commercial agency called Verbatim, which will represent Reportage’s photographers to commercial clients instead. According to the report in TIME, Reportage will keep its Emerging Talent program, but will become mainly an archive following the transition.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images Reportage shifts from editorial to commercial focus

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty employs robots for underwater shots in Rio

13 Aug

Prior to the start of the games in Rio we got a glimpse of the gear that Getty photographers are using to cover the Olympics. This week, we’ve seen a couple more of the tools the organization is using – a pair of robotic underwater camera housings. 

Veteran Getty photographer Al Bello talks about using the robotic camera housing with CNN Money, and says that they give an obvious advantage over the static underwater systems that they’ve used in the past. The robotic system allows him to pan, tilt and zoom a Canon EOS-1D X II enclosed safely in the housing as athletes pass by overhead, eliminating the guesswork that the static system required. 

You can see more of Bello’s work above and below the water in Rio by following him on Twitter and Instagram.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty employs robots for underwater shots in Rio

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images sued again, this time by Zuma Press

05 Aug

Getty Images has been sued again, this time by independent press agency Zuma Press over the alleged copyright infringement of 47,048 of its sports images. According to the lawsuit, Getty Images copied the aforementioned photos in April 2016 and made them available on its own website for both selling and licensing purposes without permission. The legal claim further states that Getty ‘altered/removed Zuma’s credit and replaced it with its own credit.’

The lawsuit, which was filed August 1 in the US District Court of the Southern District of New York, claims that, ‘Getty has been carelessly and recklessly acquiring content, not doing due diligence and not taking adequate measures to prevent infringement as well as falsifying/removing proper copyright management information… Getty has shown that it cannot and will not reform on its own accord.’

The lawsuit is seeking damages plus profits or, alternatively, statutory damages that can range from $ 2,500 to $ 25,000 per infringed photograph.

This is the second copyright infringement lawsuit filed against Getty Images in recent days. On July 25, photographer Carol M. Highsmith filed a suit against Getty for $ 1 billion over its alleged infringement of her photographers. In response, Getty said the lawsuit was based on ‘misconceptions.’

Via: Ars Technica

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images sued again, this time by Zuma Press

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images says $1 billion lawsuit is based on ‘misconceptions’

02 Aug

On July 25, photographer Carol M. Highsmith filed a lawsuit against Getty Images seeking $ 1 billion in damages over the company’s alleged infringement of her photo copyrights. The lawsuit names both Getty Images and distributor Alamy, claiming both have been charging licensing fees for the use of photos she provided to the Library of Congress for public use. The suit also names LCS, which it claims is owned by or operated under common control with Getty. In a response to the lawsuit, Getty said, ‘We believe it is based on a number of misconceptions.’

In its statement, Getty Images distances itself from the copyright infringement claim, stating that LCS was acting on behalf of Alamy.

The content in question has been part of the public domain for many years. It is standard practice for image libraries to distribute and provide access to public domain content, and it is important to note that distributing and providing access to public domain content is different to asserting copyright ownership of it.

LCS works on behalf of content creators and distributors to protect them against the unauthorized use of their work. In this instance, LCS pursued an infringement on behalf of its customer, Alamy. Any enquiries regarding that matter should be directed to Alamy; however, as soon as the plaintiff contacted LCS, LCS acted swiftly to cease its pursuit with respect to the image provided by Alamy and notified Alamy it would not pursue this content.

The company also said that, assuming it can’t ‘rectify’ the situation with Highsmith, ‘we will defend ourselves vigorously.’

Via: Getty Images

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images says $1 billion lawsuit is based on ‘misconceptions’

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Getty Images sued for $1 billion over alleged copyright infringement

29 Jul
Photographer Carol Highsmith with her Phase One camera. Photo via The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photographer Carol M. Highsmith is suing Getty Images for $ 1 billion over its alleged copyright infringement of 18,755 of her photos. The lawsuit, which was filed in a New York federal court on July 25, alleges that Getty Images has been charging fees to license her images without her permission – the same images she has provided to the Library of Congress for free use by the public. In addition to distributing her images, the lawsuit alleges that Getty did not give Highsmith proper credit for her photos.

The legal claim alleges statutory damages at up to $ 468,875,000. But because of a ruling against Getty in Morel v. Getty, a previous copyright case, the damages can reportedly be tripled to deter ‘bad faith business practices’. Highsmith became aware of Getty’s alleged copyright infringement after, she says, it sent her a letter accusing her of infringing the copyright of her own photograph by posting it on her own non-profit organization’s website.

The claim states, in part, ‘The defendants have apparently misappropriated Ms. Highsmith’s generous gift to the American people. [Getty Images and subsidiaries] are not only unlawfully charging licensing fees… but are falsely and fraudulently holding themselves out as the exclusive copyright owner.” The lawsuit also claims Highsmith’s reputation has suffered a serious blow as a result of Getty’s alleged actions. 

Via: PDNPulse, Hyperallergic

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Getty Images sued for $1 billion over alleged copyright infringement

Posted in Uncategorized

 

This is what it looks like when Getty prepares for the Olympics

26 Jul

Michael Heiman, Getty’s Director of Global Event Operations, has his work cut out for him in Rio. He’s been posting photos to his Instagram account showing the work going on behind the scenes as his team prepares to cover the Summer Olympics. From the not-so-glamorous task of installing cables, to the confusion caused when he wore a green shirt to a local hardware store, his posts have offered a fascinating look at what it takes to cover a colossal event like the Olympics.

And of course, there’s the gear. Observe:

 

It takes a lot gear to cover the Olympics. This is just some of our lens…. #mygettyriooffice #rio2016 #cps #thankscanon #lotsofglass

A photo posted by Michael Heiman (@heiman225) on

But what about the camera bodies? Glad you asked.

 

You obviously need some camera bodies to go with all that glass. #rio2016 #mygettyriooffice #gearporn #lotsofcameras #eos1dxmarkii #cps #canon #thankscanon #gettysport

A photo posted by Michael Heiman (@heiman225) on

Not surprisingly, the table is loaded with Canon EOS-1D X Mark I and II bodies, with a couple of 5DSR bodies for good measure, and L-series glass as far as the eye can see. Just another day at the office, right?

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on This is what it looks like when Getty prepares for the Olympics

Posted in Uncategorized