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Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

18 Feb

Whether you are traveling abroad or within your own country, there are several mistakes that I’ve seen travel photographers make that hinder the process of making memorable photos.

Five Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

Mistake #1: Not being aware of cultural sensitivities and laws

When you travel to another country it’s easy to forget that the people there may see certain things differently than you. For example, in China, you will see signs up in temples asking you not to take photos. So it should be fairly obvious that doing so may cause offense.

Others are not so obvious. Did you know that in Spain the law prohibits photographers from taking photos of people in public without permission unless they are taking part in a cultural event such as a festival? That’s right, Spain is not a great place to be a street photographer (although that doesn’t stop people from doing it).

Unless you know this, you probably think taking candid photos of people in Spain is perfectly okay (as it is in most other places). Once you understand the attitude (and the law) towards photographing people in Spain, you can adjust your behavior to fit in with local expectations and behavior.

If you want to create a street photo of somebody, it’s best to stop them and ask for permission. That way you protect yourself and (added bonus!) keep out of trouble with the police.

Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

I made this street portrait in Cadiz, Spain after asking the street vendor if I could take his photo. If I had tried to take a photo without him noticing it would have been illegal, and if he had called the police I would have been on the wrong side of the law.

Some countries have laws forbidding the photography of certain buildings, like airports. Did you know that photographers have been arrested, jailed, and accused of spying in Greece for photographing an airshow at a military base? If you’re going to Greece it’s a good idea to know which buildings are out of bounds for photographers. Make sure you’re aware of any legal restrictions in your country of travel.

Mistake #2: Being disrespectful to local people

When you travel somewhere new, especially somewhere that is exotic to you, it’s easy to treat people as if they were laid out, like colorful extras in a movie scene, for you to take photos of. That is not true, and it’s disrespectful and unkind to act as if it is. Imagine how you would feel if somebody from another country came and tried to take photos as you went about your daily life, without consideration for you and your feelings.

It seems to me that a big part of the problem is when people travel through other countries without interacting with locals in anything other than a commercial context, such as renting a hotel room or eating in a restaurant. Sometimes this is down to language – it’s hard to strike up a conversation in China if you don’t speak Chinese, for example.

But your travels (and life in general) can become a lot more interesting if you are open to non-commercial experiences with local people. Try having conversations with people about their hopes and dreams, what they do for a living, how they like living in their town and similar topics. You’ll gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the places you’re traveling through when you do.

Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

A Spanish friend of mine invited me to see a farm owned by a member of her family. I would never have gotten to see the farm or make this photo if we didn’t know each other.

Language study is an excellent way to meet local people. I have many good friends in Spain and South America that I met online through websites aimed to help people learn other languages. I’ve met most of them in person and learned a lot about their culture and countries in the process.

Mistake #3: Not putting safety first

Another mistake I’ve seen photographers make is forgetting to take care of their personal security or failing to take appropriate precautions to guard their gear against theft.

Most photographers travel to most places without any security problems, but there is always the potential for something to go wrong, especially if you don’t put much thought into your personal safety and the security of your camera and computer equipment. Some countries are safe, others can be dangerous, so make sure you do your research beforehand and take any appropriate precautions.

A good travel insurance policy that covers your gear (check the fine print) will help give you peace of mind if the worse does happen.

Mistake #4: Taking too much gear

We’ve all seen the type of photographer that walks around with a large dSLR camera and telephoto lens, perhaps even two, swinging from their side.

At the other extreme are photographers who travel with just one camera and one lens. When I worked at EOS magazine we published an article about a photographer who traveled to India with one camera and a single 50mm lens. He made some beautiful images so the approach worked for him.

Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

During a recent trip to China, I calculated afterward that I had used my 35mm lens for 73% of the photos, including the one above. That tells me that I probably could have taken just that lens and still enjoyed a very productive journey.

There’s nothing wrong with taking lots of gear, especially if it works for you. Professionals often take lots of lenses so they know they are covered for just about any situation they may encounter. But there are a couple of things worth considering.

  • The first is that a large camera and lens combo is an obvious target for theft. Smaller cameras attract less attention and don’t look as expensive.
  • The other consideration is creative. If you have too much gear it’s heavy to carry around and you can waste time trying to decide which lens/camera combination to use.

The key is to think in advance about the subject matter you intend to photograph and what gear you’ll need for it. If you are into long exposure photography, for example, then you’re going to need a tripod, cable release and neutral density filters.

If you are photographing people, you need to decide what lens or lenses you are going to use for portraits. If you are photographing local architecture, you will probably need a good wide-angle lens. If you are going to walk around all day taking street photos, a small camera and lens are much less tiring than a large DSLR with a telephoto zoom.

You get the idea. Ultimately, you need to find the right balance between taking enough gear to meet your needs and taking too much. Also, if security is a concern, you may want to consider leaving your more expensive gear at home.

Mistake #5: Not doing enough research

If there’s one mistake that links all the others, it’s this one – not doing enough research. It’s important because it makes you aware of any local laws or cultural sensitivities you need to know (mistake #1).

As part of your research, you may get in touch with local people (mistake #2) who can give you advice or help you gain access to places or events you would never know about otherwise. Some photographers go even further and work with a fixer – somebody who introduces you to other people, translates if necessary, and acts as a bridge between you and the local culture.

Research alerts you to any security considerations (mistake #3). It helps you decide what gear you need to take, and avoid overload caused by taking too much equipment (mistake #4).

In other words, doing your research is a key part of avoiding the mistakes that many travel photographers make.

Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

Research also helps you find interesting places to photograph, such as this ancient fishing village in north Devon.

Conclusion

These mistakes are based on my observations of other photographers while traveling. But what mistakes have you seen other photographers make? What mistakes have you made yourself? I’m looking forward to hearing your responses in the comments section below.


The Candid Portrait

If you’d like to learn more about street and travel photography then please check out my popular ebook popular ebook The Creative Portrait.

The post Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers by Andrew S. Gibson appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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These are the six finalists for 2018 World Press Photo of the Year (NSFW)

16 Feb

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

Warning: This slideshow contains graphic and disturbing imagery that is not suitable for children, and may not be suitable for viewing in the workplace. Proceed with caution.


World Press Photo has changed its announcement process for the coveted World Press Photo of the Year award in 2018. Rather than announcing the overall and category winners at once, they have revealed the six finalists for 2018 World Press Photo of the Year today, almost two months before the official awards ceremony in Amsterdam on April 12th.

The finalists are… harrowing. Six heartbreaking and at times graphic images that were selected from 73,044 entries by 4,548 photographers from 125 countries. Judging was done by “a group of internationally recognized professionals in the fields of photojournalism and documentary photography,” who convened in Amsterdam, where they were presented with all of the entries anonymously.

Behind the scenes photograph of the judging process.

Every single nominated photograph, including all singles and stories in seven of the eight contest categories, is eligible for the World Press Photo of the Year grand prize. And yet, New York Times photographer Ivor Prickett managed to get two of his photos into the top six, both captured as part of his Battle for Mosul series.

You can see all 312 nominated photographs across eight categories on the World Press Photo website, and learn more about the entire contest in the press release below. To view the six finalists for World Press Photo of the year, scroll through the slideshow above.

The World Press Photo of the Year winner will be announced in April, where he will receive a 10,000 Euro cash prize and a selection of camera equipment from Canon.

Press Release

World Press Photo announces 2018 awards nominees

The World Press Photo Foundation announces the results of its renowned contests, the 61st annual World Press Photo Contest and the 8th annual World Press Photo Digital Storytelling Contest.

Amsterdam, 14 February 2018

This year the announcement process is new

The foundation is today announcing the nominees in each category of the Photo Contest and the Digital Storytelling Contest, with the winners to be revealed at the Awards Show in Amsterdam on 12 April.

The highlight of today’s announcement is that, for the first time, the six nominees for the World Press Photo of the Year are revealed. The winner of the World Press Photo of the Year will be announced at the Awards Show in Amsterdam on 12 April.

Lars Boering, managing director of the World Press Photo Foundation:

“The best visual journalism is not of something; it is about something. It should matter to the people to whom it speaks. Today the World Press Photo Foundation continues to play the role it began with in 1955 because the juries in our contests nominate the best photographers and producers. The great work in this 2018 edition of our contests helps us fulfill our purpose: connecting the world to the stories that matter.”

The 2018 World Press Photo Contest

The jury selected nominees in eight categories, including the new environment category. They are 42 photographers from 22 countries: Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, China, Colombia, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, UK, USA and Venezuela. Of these nominees, 15 have won previous World Press Photo awards, while 27 are being recognized for the first time. In total, there are 312 nominated photographs across the eight categories.

  • Gallery of all 2018 Photo Contest nominees.

The World Press Photo of the Year honors the photographer whose visual creativity and skills made a picture that captures or represents an event or issue of great journalistic importance in the last year. Each nominated photograph, including all singles and stories in seven of the eight contest categories (excluding Long-Term Projects) is eligible for the World Press Photo of the Year.

The six nominees for the World Press Photo of the Year are, in alphabetical order:

  • Rohingya Crisis | Patrick Brown, Australia, Panos Pictures, for Unicef
  • Boko Haram Strapped Suicide Bombs to Them. Somehow These Teenage Girls Survived. – Aisha, age 14. | Adam Ferguson, Australia, for The New York Times
  • Witnessing the Immediate Aftermath of an Attack in the Heart of London – Toby Melville, UK, Reuters
  • The Battle for Mosul – Lined Up for an Aid Distribution | Ivor Prickett, Ireland, for The New York Times
  • The Battle for Mosul – Young Boy Is Cared for by Iraqi Special Forces Soldiers | Ivor Prickett, Ireland, for The New York Times
  • Venezuela Crisis | Ronaldo Schemidt, Venezuela, Agence France-Presse

See the video of the jury discussing why they chose these six photographs.

The 2018 Photo Contest details

The contest is free to enter and drew entries from around the world: 4,548 photographers from 125 countries submitted 73,044 images.

A group of internationally recognized professionals in the fields of photojournalism and documentary photography—chaired by Magdalena Herrera—convened in Amsterdam to judge all entries. The jury is independent, and all entries were presented anonymously. A secretary without voting rights safeguards the fairness of the process, which is explained in full here.

For the full list of jury members and secretaries, please see here.

The World Press Photo Foundation will release a technical report reviewing the contest, including the code of ethics, entry rules, and verification process on Monday, 5 March.

Prizes

The premier award, the World Press Photo of the Year, carries a cash prize of 10,000 euros. In addition, Canon will present the winning photographer with a selection of camera equipment. For more information about Canon, visit here.

Nominees have their travel and lodging paid for by the World Press Photo Foundation to Amsterdam so they can attend the World Press Photo Festival, an event taking place 13-14 April featuring photographer presentations, screenings, and talks. They also receive a diploma and a Golden Eye Award at the Awards Show.

2018 Exhibition

The prize-winning photographs are assembled into an exhibition that travels to 100 locations in 45 countries and is seen by more than 4 million people each year. The winning pictures are also published in the annual yearbook, which is available in multiple languages. The first World Press Photo exhibition opens in De Nieuwe Kerk, Amsterdam, on 14 April 2018. For more information about the exhibition in Amsterdam, please follow this link.

This year’s exhibition displays will be printed on Canon large-format and Arizona flatbed printers. Please see the Canon website for further information: http://www.canon-europe.com/

The 2018 World Press Photo Digital Storytelling Contest

The Digital Storytelling Contest (previously known as the Multimedia Contest) rewards those producing the best forms of visual journalism enabled by digital technologies and the spread of the Internet. The contest is open to digital storytellers, visual journalists and producers, with submissions that include the work of a professional visual journalist.

  • Gallery of all 2018 Digital Storytelling Contest nominees.

The 2018 Digital Storytelling Contest in numbers

This year, 308 productions were submitted to the contest: 149 Short Form, 63 Long Form, 68 Immersive Storytelling and 28 Innovative Storytelling.

Prizes

Nominees in each category are invited to the World Press Photo Festival in Amsterdam. A representative from each of the nominated productions will have their travel and lodging paid for by the World Press Photo Foundation. The winners in each category will receive a diploma and a Golden Eye Award, presented during the Awards Show. The prize-winning projects are assembled into an exhibition that travels to select locations.

The FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

The FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo recognizes a documentary photographer whose project demonstrates courage and commitment in the pursuit of human rights. The 2018 winner is Standing Strong by Josué Rivas.

FotoEvidence was founded in 2011 by photojournalist Svetlana Bachevanova as part of the humanistic tradition of photography. In 2017 FotoEvidence partnered with World Press Photo and the book award became the FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo.

FotoEvidence publishes the winning project in a high quality, hardbound book, which will be launched at the World Press Photo Exhibition 2018 in Amsterdam on 14 April 2018, and then shown in several cities around the globe.

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

Rohingya Crisis | © Patrick Brown, Panos Pictures, for Unicef


28 September 2017

The bodies of Rohingya refugees are laid out after the boat in which they were attempting to flee Myanmar capsized about eight kilometers off Inani Beach, near Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Around 100 people were on the boat before it capsized. There were 17 survivors.

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

Boko Haram Strapped Suicide Bombs to Them. Somehow These Teenage Girls Survived. – Aisha, age 14. | © Adam Ferguson, for The New York Times


21 September 2017

Aisha (14) stands for a portrait in Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria. After being kidnapped by Boko Haram, Aisha was assigned a suicide bombing mission, but managed to escape and find help instead of detonating the bombs.

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

Witnessing the Immediate Aftermath of an Attack in the Heart of London | © Toby Melville, Reuters


22 March 2017

A passerby comforts an injured woman after Khalid Masood drove his car into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge in London, UK, killing five and injuring multiple others.

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

The Battle for Mosul – Lined Up for an Aid Distribution | © Ivor Prickett, for The New York Times


15 March 2017

Civilians who had remained in west Mosul after the battle to take the city line up for aid in the Mamun neighbourhood.

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

The Battle for Mosul – Young Boy Is Cared for by Iraqi Special Forces Soldiers | © Ivor Prickett, for The New York Times


12 July 2017

An unidentified young boy, who was carried out of the last ISIS-controlled area in the Old City by a man suspected of being a militant, is cared for by Iraqi Special Forces soldiers.

The Finalists for World Press Photo of the Year 2018

Venezuela Crisis | © Ronaldo Schemidt, Agence France-Presse


3 May 2017

José Víctor Salazar Balza (28) catches fire amid violent clashes with riot police during a protest against President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas, Venezuela.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Improve Your Photography in 2018 with These 6 Deals (48 Hours Only)

26 Dec

This year’s 12 days of Christmas was huge with some amazing savings on some great photography training and software.

However – because it’s a busy time of year – we know some of you missed out.

So for the next 48 hours only we’re brining all 6 deals back!

That’s right – all of our ebooks, presets, and courses are rarely all on sale at once, so now you can create your dream learning library – but only for 48 more hours.

We also have 3 amazing partner deals so be sure to check those out too while you still can.

Here are all the deals one last time…

  • 23 dPS Photography eBooks, only $ 9 each
  • THIS WAS HOT > 44 printable photography field guides, only $ 29, Save $ 191
  • 60% on All dPS Lightroom Presets
  • 70% Off ‘Behind the Scenes’ Travel Photography Course
  • 62% on All dPS Photography Courses
  • 67% on the Ultimate Lightroom Workflow Toolkit from 3 Colors

Don’t miss out.

Access our exclusive Partner Bonus Offers from New York Institute of Photography, KelbyOne, Perfectly Clear and ON1 when you purchase any dPS Christmas Deal. Check your purchase receipt email for the access link!

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Transform Your Images with a Click – 62% off these Lightroom Presets Today

17 Dec

We’re at day 5 of our dPS 12 Days of Christmas and today we have one that we know many of you who use Lightroom will LOVE. It’s 62% off any of our Lightroom Presets bundles!

If you have ever looked at other people’s beautiful images and have wondered, “Why don’t mine look like that?” Then you’ll find todays deals perfect for you.

These beautiful presets have been created by some of our favourite photographers to save you a whole lot of processing time.

They will help you convert your photos from average to amazing with just one click.

Here’s the deal – 101 Lightroom Presets for just $ 19 USD:

Normally $ 49 – today you can pick up any one of these 101 presets packs for just $ 19 USD (62% off).

  • 101 Lightroom Presets by Cole Joseph – to take your landscapes and people photos from average to amazing… including 7 high quality collections
  • 101 LANDSCAPES Lightroom Presets by Todd and Sarah Sisson – for all scenery seasons including a bonus toolbox of stackable presets
  • 101 Lightroom PORTRAITS Presets by Rachel Devine – including 67 different presets and 36 different portrait brushes

These collections have been created exclusively for dPS by professional photographers to make your photos “pop” and save you time getting the look you want.

With these collections and a few clicks in Lightroom, people will be wondering why their images are not as stunning as yours!

Each one contains 101 presets – at just $ 19 USD that’s around 18 cents per preset. Whether you just grab the one pack or all three you’ll love todays deal.

Bonus Parter Offers

Anyone who picks up any of the offers during these 12 days of offers gets to take advantage of your exclusive DPS Christmas Deals Bonus Offers, like todays featured bonus where you can pick up Perfectly Clear Complete for just $ 89 USD.

Christmas Deals:
Bonus Offers

Bonus Offers

Brought to you by

ON1
Athentec Perfectly Clear
KelbyOne
New York Institute of Photography

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These are the winners of Nat Geo’s Nature Photographer of the Year 2017

14 Dec

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

National Geographic has revealed the winners of their annual Nature Photographer of the Year contest, and as usual, every photo from the Grand Prize winner all the way to the Honorable Mentions and People’s Choice awards are fantastic.

The Grand Prize this year—and title of Nature Photographer of the Year—went to Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore, who captured an intense wildlife portrait of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park. The photo, titled “Face to Face in a River in Borneo,” was selected from over 11,000 entries and earns Bojan $ 10,000 in prize money, in addition to his image showing up in an upcoming issue of National Geographic.

Speaking of the moment he captured the shot, Bojan told Nat Geo:

Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.

You can see Bojan’s grand prize winning image, as well as every 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and People’s Choice winner in the slideshow above, or by visiting the National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year website.

Press Release

National Geographic Announces Winners of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

WASHINGTON (Dec. 12, 2017) – Selected from over 11,000 entries, a wildlife photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park has been selected as the grand-prize winner of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The photo, titled “Face to face in a river in Borneo,” was captured by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore. He has won $ 10,000 and will have his winning image published in an upcoming issue of National Geographic magazine and featured on the @NatGeo Instagram account.

Bojan took the winning photo after waiting patiently in the Sekoyner River in Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia. After spending several days on a houseboat photographing orangutans in the park, Bojan learned of a location where a male orangutan had crossed the river –­ unusual behavior that he knew he had to capture. After waiting a day and night near the suspected location, a ranger spotted the orangutan the next morning at a spot a few minutes up the river. As they drew near, Bojan decided to get into the water so the boat did not scare the primate. About five feet deep in a river supposedly home to freshwater crocodiles, Bojan captured the photo when the orangutan peeked out from behind a tree to see if the photographer was still there.

On capturing the photo, Bojan said, “Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.”

Karim Iliya of Haiku, Hawaii, won first place in the Landscapes category for a photo from Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park; Jim Obester of Vancouver, Wash., won first place in the Underwater category for a photo of an anemone; and Todd Kennedy of New South Wales, Australia, won first place in the Aerials category for a photo of a rock pool in Sydney at high tide.

The judges for the contest were National Geographic magazine’s senior photo editor of natural history assignments, Kathy Moran, National Geographic photographer Anand Varma, and photographer Michaela Skovranova.

Contestants submitted photographs in four categories – Wildlife, Landscape, Aerials and Underwater – through National Geographic’s photography community, Your Shot. All of the winning photos, along with the honorable mentions, may be viewed at natgeo.com/photocontest.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Wildlife and Grand Prize Winner

Photo © Jayprakash Joghee Bojan, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A male orangutan peers from behind a tree while crossing a river in Borneo, Indonesia.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Underwater

Photo © Jim Obester, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Jim Obester, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Blue-filtered strobe lights stimulate fluorescent pigments in the clear tentacles of a tube-dwelling anemone in Hood Canal, Washington.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Landscapes

Photo © Karim Iliya, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Karim Iliya, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Shortly before twilight in Kalapana, Hawai’i, a fragment of the cooled lava tube broke away, leaving the molten rock to fan in a fiery spray for less than half an hour before returning to a steady flow.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Aerials

Photo © Todd Kennedy, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Todd Kennedy, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

In Sydney, Australia, the Pacific Ocean at high tide breaks over a natural rock pool enlarged in the 1930s. Avoiding the crowds at the city’s many beaches, a local swims laps.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Wildlife

Photo © Alejandro Prieto, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Alejandro Prieto, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

An adult Caribbean pink flamingo feeds a chick in Yucatán, Mexico. Both parents alternate feeding chicks, at first with a liquid baby food called crop milk, and then with regurgitated food.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Underwater

Photo © Shane Gross, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Shane Gross, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Typically a shy species, a Caribbean reef shark investigates a remote-triggered camera in Cuba’s Gardens of the Queen marine protected area.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Landscapes

Photo © Yuhan Liao, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Yuhan Liao, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Sunlight glances off mineral strata of different colors in Dushanzi Grand Canyon, China.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Aerials

Photo © Takahiro Bessho, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Takahiro Bessho, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Snow-covered metasequoia trees, also called dawn redwoods, interlace over a road in Takashima, Japan.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Wildlife

Photo © Bence Mate, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Bence Mate, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Two grey herons spar as a white-tailed eagle looks on in Hungary.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Underwater

Photo © Michael Patrick O’Neill, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Michael Patrick O’Neill, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Buoyed by the Gulf Stream, a flying fish arcs through the night-dark water five miles off Palm Beach, Florida.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Landscapes

Photo © Mike Olbinski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Mike Olbinski Photography, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A summer thunderstorm unleashes lightning on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Aerials

Photo © Greg C., 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Greg C., 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

On the flanks of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i, the world’s only lava ocean entry spills molten rock into the Pacific Ocean. After erupting in early 2016, the lava flow took about two months to reach the sea, six miles away.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Wildlife

Photo © Harry Collins, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Harry Collins, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A great gray owl swoops to kill in a New Hampshire field.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Underwater

Photo © Matthew Smith, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Matthew Smith, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A Portuguese man-of-war nears the beach on a summer morning; thousands of these jellyfish wash up on Australia’s eastern coast every year.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Landscapes

Photo © Wojciech Kruczynski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by Wojciech Kruczy?ski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Sunset illuminates a lighthouse and rainbow in the Faroe Islands.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People’s Choice | Aerials

Photo © David Swindler, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.


Photograph by David Swindler, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Green vegetation blooms at the river’s edge, or riparian, zone of a meandering canyon in Utah.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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These are the 15 most popular Flickr photos of 2017

09 Dec

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Yesterday, Flickr revealed the Top 25 Photos on Flickr in 2017, simultaneously wowing photography fans and reminding people that Flickr is still an active community of millions of photographers from across the globe. That’s right Instagram… you haven’t stolen everybody yet.

The top 25 includes dreamy childhood portraits by Iwona Podlasinska and Elena Shumilova, a spectacular eruption photo by Albert Dros, a perfectly-timed wildlife photo by Salah Baazizi, and much much more.

Flickr was kind enough to share the top 15 with DPReview, so you can scroll through those in the gallery above. And if you want to see numbers 16-25, or check out Flickr’s Top Genre Galleries, Top Country Galleries, and more, head over to the Flickr Top 25 blog post.


All photos used courtesy of Flickr.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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These are the best cameras you can buy right now

03 Dec

Best cameras you can buy right now

Suppose you’re the kind of person who reads movie spoilers online, or unwraps all of your presents on Christmas Eve. Does that make you a monster? Sure, but we’re not here to judge. You’d probably also like to know which are the very best cameras on the market right now without reading our meticulously prepared and exhaustively researched buying guides. That’s fine. You can cut right to the chase and find out which cameras we picked as category winners right here, you utter fiend.

Canon EOS M6

It’s light, offers a healthy dose of direct controls and includes Canon’s excellent Dual Pixel autofocus technology. It’s our pick for parents, but it’s a great option for someone who wants DSLR-like capabilities and controls in a compact package.

Read more about the Canon EOS M6

Canon EOS M100

It’s an incarnation of the M6 with less direct control, but it’s also several hundred dollars cheaper. We think it’s an ideal lightweight point-and-shoot and it’s our top pick if you’re looking to spend around $ 500 on a new camera.

Read more about the Canon EOS M100

Canon EOS Rebel SL2

Beginners looking for an unfussy DSLR to get started will feel right at home with the SL2. We think its Feature Assistant is useful, and it offers all of the same guts of the M6 in a more approachable form.

Read more about the Canon SL2

Fujifilm X100F

You love it. We love it. Everyone loves the X100F. It’s truly the photography press’s darling, and it’s our pick in the fixed prime lens category thanks to its excellent JPEG processing and dreamy form factor. To a large chunk of the photo-taking population it’s an impractical novelty, but it sure is nice if you just want to enjoy the heck out of making photos.

Read more about Fujifilm X100F

Nikon D5600

The D5600 is our pick for both photography students and anyone looking to spend less than $ 1000. It’s not sexy, but it’s reliable, versatile, and offers modern refinements like a touchscreen and Wi-Fi with Bluetooth.

Read more about the Nikon D5600

Nikon D7500

We recommend the D7500 in the sub-$ 1500 category for many of the reasons we picked the D5600 in the category below it: it’s just an extremely well-rounded camera. Impressive subject tracking, good AF, and a proven 20.9MP sensor all contribute to making this the best buy in its price category.

Read more about the Nikon D7500

Nikon D750

Speaking of cameras that just don’t quit, the D750 is over three years old but it’s still competitive – and is attractively priced lately. Despite its age we think it’s the best you can do for under $ 2000 thanks to reliable autofocus and excellent image quality.

Read more about the Nikon D750

Nikon D850

The D850 shares a spot with the Sony a7R III as a top pick for landscape photographers and cameras over $ 2000. ISO 64 gives it a slight edge for photographers who need the ultimate in dynamic range, and it inherits a highly capable autofocus system from the D5. It comes up a little short in terms of pro video capabilities, but outside of that it’s simply one of the best all-around performers you can buy now.

Read more about the Nikon D850

Nikon D5

For sports, the D5 is hands-down the most capable camera out there. It’s ultra-tough and couples 14 fps shooting with the best phase-detection AF on the market. Plenty of shooters would find its smaller sibling, the D500 to be more than enough to suit their needs, but for the pro who needs the absolute best, there’s nothing to top it at the moment.

Read more about the Nikon D5

Panasonic Lumix GH5

If you’re serious about video and you want the best hybrid camera money can buy, get the GH5. It’s outfitted with pro-level tools and boasts excellent stabilization for handheld shots. Oh, and it’s a pretty darn good stills camera too.

Read more about the Panasonic GH5

Sony a7R III

The a7R III ranks as one of the very best cameras we tested this year, tying the equally impressive Nikon D850 as winner in the best for landscape photography and $ 2000 and up category. It’s also our top pick for event photography, thanks to incredibly fast and accurate Eye-AF.

Read more about the Sony a7R III

Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

Our top pick for travelers is the previous-generation RX10, which saves you several hundred dollars off the price of the Mark IV if you can live without a touchscreen and state-of-the-art autofocus. You’ll still get that generous 24-600mm equiv. zoom range and top notch 4K video capture for all of those vacation memories.

Read more about the Sony RX10 III

Sony Cyber-shot RX10 IV

If we’re going to talk about the very best cameras available now, we do need to mention the latest and greatest in the RX10 series. If there’s a superzoom that can convince us we’re shooting with a pro sports camera, this is it. It’s incredibly pricey but its hybrid AF, 24 fps shooting and oversampled 4K are unparalleled in its class.

Read more about the Sony RX10 IV

Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V

Ten years ago, if you’d told us that a camera that fits in your pocket can record incredible 4K video, shoot 24 fps, and offer 315 point phase detection AF we’d have laughed in your face. Yet here we are in the year 2017, and the RX100 V has made fools of us all. Do you pay handsomely for all of that cutting edge technology? Of course. But if you’re looking for the best of the best, look no further.

Read more about the Sony RX100 V

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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These are the best smartphone cameras you can buy now

19 Nov

Few would argue that in 2017 the mobile device industry is a major driver of imaging hardware innovation. Long gone are the days when the size of the image sensor and the aperture were the major determining factors for image quality. Instead, phone manufacturers have turned to software and computational imaging methods to achieve better detail, wider dynamic range and lower noise levels, as well as high-quality zooming and DSLR-like bokeh effects.

High-powered chipsets with built-in image signal processors and sensors with very fast read-out times make it possible to combine image data that is captured by dual-lenses, or several frames recorded in quick succession, within milliseconds. These methods produce image quality that would have been unthinkable on a smartphone only a few years ago and often surpasses basic compact cameras.

Thanks to those advances in software, but also new hardware concepts, such as dual-cameras, hybrid AF-systems and more powerful image signal processors, current smartphone cameras are better than ever before. Here is our selection of the best models available in 2017, noting where their particular strengths lie.


Best display: Apple iPhone X

Dual 12MP-camera | 28/52mm equiv. focal lengths | F1.8 and F2.4 apertures | OIS | 4K/60fps video | 5.8-inch display

Apple’s brand new flagship iPhone X pulls all the technological plugs and comes with features and specifications that we haven’t seen on any iPhones or even other smartphones before. The iPhone X offers a marginally faster F2.4 telephoto lens than its cousin iPhone 8 Plus and, compared to last year’s 7 Plus, adds optical image stabilization in the telephoto lens. On the video side of things the X is capable of recording 4K footage at 60 frames per second and slow-motion clips at 1080p resolution and 240fps.

As you would expect, all the new technology has a boosting effect on image quality and the iPhone X is currently ranked second on DxOMark.com, behind only the Google Pixel 2, and with the currently highest Photo score of 101 points.

But the iPhone X not only offers outstanding image quality, it improves on the imaging viewing experience too. The iPhone X’s wide gamut OLED is the most color accurate device on the market, partially thanks to iOS’ internal color management but also because of display calibration. That’s a benefit to anyone who takes and looks at photos on their mobile device.

The device also comes with a number of innovative features. Portrait Lighting is an AI-powered feature in beta that works with front and rear cameras. It allows users to apply different lighting styles on top of simulated-bokeh-portraits. The iPhone X also used Face-ID to unlock the device, relying on an array of cameras and sensors at the top of the edge-to-edge display.

What we like: Excellent detail and dynamic range, natural bokeh mode, 4K video at 60 fps

What we don’t like: Price, underexposure and red-eye with flash


Best for video: LG V30

Dual-camera | 16MP 1/3.1″ / F1.6 / OIS main camera | 13MP / F1.9 super-wide-angle | 4K/30fps video | manual video control | 6.0-inch display

The LG V30 is the Korean manufacturer’s latest flagship smartphone and comes with an unusual dual-camera setup. Instead of a telephoto lens the V30 offers a secondary super-wide-angle that lets you squeeze more scene into the frame, without the need for accessory lenses.

The V30 also sets itself apart from the competition with a very comprehensive video mode that comes with manual control over shutter speed and sound recording levels, among many other parameters. You can also choose from 15 new Cine Effect color presets that are based on film genres and the Point Zoom mode allows for stable zooming into a target in the frame rather than the center.

In testing for our forthcoming review we found the V30 to deliver excellent video image quality. Still images are good as well, with wide dynamic range and good sharpness across the frame, but levels of detail lag just a touch behind the very best on the main camera and can be pretty low on the super-wide-angle. Still, the V30 is an excellent option for mobile videographers and those who appreciate a super-wide-angle.

What we like: Great video feature set and stabilization, super-wide-angle offers new framing options, excellent display

What we don’t like: Poor detail on super-wide-angle, zoom quality, no bokeh mode


Best for zoom: Samsung Galaxy Note 8

Dual-camera | 12MP / F1.7 / 26mm main camera | 12MP / F2.4 / 52mm | OIS | 4K/30fps video | 6.3-inch display

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 is the Korean company’s late entry to the dual-camera game but has immediately set new standards. The camera module combines a 26mm equivalent 12MP wide-angle module with a 52mm equivalent tele camera.

The secondary camera comes with a smaller sensor and slower aperture than the main module, but together with the iPhone X the Note 8 is one of very few dual-cam smartphones to offer optical image stabilization in both lenses. In DxOMark’s Mobile testing the dual-camera setup achieves outstanding results, including the best zoom performance among all current smartphones. Good detail and a natural looking bokeh mode also contribute to the high overall score of 94 points.

In the video department the Note 8 comes with 4K resolution and a 240fps slow-motion option. With its massive 6.3″ Quad-HD+ display and S-Pen stylus the Note 8 is also an interesting option for those photographers who like image editing on the device. It stands up very well in our comparison against the iPhone X, making it a great option for any Android user.

What we like: Class-leading zoom, large display and stylus, good bokeh mode

What we don’t like: Lower DR than some competitors, price


Best computational imaging device: Google Pixel 2

12.2MP 1/2.6″ sensor | F1.8 aperture | OIS | 4K/30fps video | 5.0-inch display

The original Pixel was one of last year’s best smartphones and there is no doubt version two is following right in its footsteps. The Pixel 2 is one of the few current high-end smartphones with a single-lens camera but it makes up for a secondary camera with a host of advanced Google software features.

Despite a slightly smaller image sensor than on the predecessor, the Pixel 2 achieves excellent dynamic range and very good detail in all conditions, earning it the best overall performance and the current top spot in the DxOMark Mobile ranking. Testers were also impressed with the video mode that combines optical and electronic stabilization for ultra-smooth footage.

The Pixel 2 might have to make do without a secondary lens but thanks to Google’s software wizardry and Dual Pixel technology (split left/right pixels) it’s still capable of creating a usable fake bokeh Portrait Mode effect, and digital zoom has improved over the previous generation as well.

Early Pixel 2 adopters have reported some display troubles but Google has taken measures to fix them, making the Pixel 2 an easy recommendation for any mobile photographer. As a bonus the device comes with an integrated but currently dormant image processor called Visual Core. When it’s activated via a software update in the near future, it should give the Pixel 2’s image quality another boost.

What we like: Class-leading detail and dynamic range, excellent hybrid video stabilization, “pure” Android operating system

What we don’t like: Display issues on early units, lower zoom and bokeh performance than closest competitors


Best for black-and-white photography fans: Huawei Mate 10 Pro

Dual-camera | 12MP RGB and 20MP monochrome sensors | F1.6 aperture | OIS | 4K/30fps video | 6.0-inch display

The Huawei Mate 10 Pro is not a cheap smartphone but will cost you significantly less than the Leica M10 or pretty much any other Leica camera for that matter. So, if you always wanted to carry a Leica in your pocket but are strapped for cash, the Huawei device might be a good compromise. It doesn’t come with the famous red dot but, like the P10 and several other recent Huawei smartphones it has a Leica badge right next to its camera module.

It’s not all about the badge though. The Mate 10 Pro comes with an innovative dual-camera setup that combines a 12MP RGB sensor with a 20MP monochrome chip. Image data from both sensors is combined computationally to achieve better detail, increased dynamic range and lower noise levels. The high-resolution monochrome sensor also allows for a 2x lossless zoom and a unique Huawei feature: a monochrome mode that doesn’t simply convert RGB images, but captures black and white images natively.

And Huawei isn’t relying on hardware alone on the Mate 10 Pro. AI and neural networking are applied to improve the quality of the fake bokeh mode and power the automatic scene selection’s object recognition. Motion detection reduces motion blur in low light conditions.

The combination of innovative hardware and software concepts pays off and at 97 points the Mate 10 Pro achieves one of the best overall scores on DxOMark, tying the iPhone X for second place in the ranking.

What we like: Great detail in low light, monochrome mode, decent zoom and bokeh

What we don’t like: Limited slow-motion video options

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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These are the winners of the UK’s Landscape Photographer of the Year contest

02 Nov

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The winners of the 2017 “Take a View – Landscape Photographer of the Year” contest have been announced—a competition that aims to find the best images of the UK from photographers around the world. This year’s winner of the top prize and title was Benjamin Graham with a nicely uncomplicated view of the dunes at West Wittering in West Sussex.

The competition, which is in its 11th year, has a prize fund of £17,000. £10,000 goes to the Landscape Photographer of the Year, £1,000 to the winners of the four adult categories and the youth prize, and £500 to second placed images in the adult categories.

This year’s winners are:

Landscape Photographer of the Year
Benjamin Graham

Classic view
Rachael Talibart

Living the view
Paul Fowles

Urban view
George Robertson

Your view
Neil Burnell

Youth winner
Andrew Bulloch (15)

The competition also had prizes from sponsors Network Rail (Jon Martin wins a trip to photograph the Forth Bridge in Scotland) and VisitBritain (Graham Niven), and from Fujifilm for the best print, Lee Filters and The Sunday Times. For a full list of winners and to see all the winning images visit the Take a View: Landscape Photographer of the Year website.

The winning images and those in the shortlists will form a book as well as a free exhibition that will be held in London’s Waterloo station from November 20th, 2017 through February 4th, 2018.

Press Release

Landscape Photographer of the Year 2017

The Winner is Announced

A photograph of the UK’s stunning coastline wins the top prize for the third year running, as Benjamin Graham’s image of the dunes at West Wittering in West Sussex becomes the eleventh winner of the overall title: Landscape Photographer of the Year. The judges chose Benjamin’s image from thousands of entries celebrating the richly diverse landscape of the UK.

Winning the top prize of £10,000, Benjamin was attracted by the ambiguity of the scene:

“As well as its minimal simplicity, I particularly like the indeterminate scale of the image. The double S-curve could be two metres long or two thousand… It was actually about twenty.”

Charlie Waite, one of Britain’s leading landscape photographers and founder of the Awards spoke about the winning image:

“Benjamin’s image has a hypnotic and contemplative quality that acts as an antidote to turbulent times. When at the coast, we often just stand and gaze out to sea and seem to gain some kind of spiritual well-being from doing so. This image suggests the same emotional experience and the composition leads the eye on to infinite calm.”

From flower fields and land patterns to romantic castles and historic bridges, the winning photographs in the ‘Take a view – Landscape Photographer of the Year Awards’ not only display the talent of their creators but also inspire visitors to explore and discover the wonders of the British countryside.

The Young Landscape Photographer of the Year title has been awarded to Andrew Bulloch, whose image of an urban skatepark set against a backdrop of the Northern Lights shows a meeting of the man-made world with one of nature’s most fascinating phenomena.

For the third year, the Awards are being held in association with VisitBritain and the GREAT campaign to showcase the diversity of amazing moments and experiences that can be only be had on a trip across Britain. The VisitBritain ‘Home of Amazing Moments’ Award was offered for the photograph judged to best capture the spirit of the campaign. The winning image, by Graham Niven, of an early morning boat trip on Loch Garten in the Cairngorms is taken from a viewpoint that allows the viewer to feel involved and part of the ‘amazing moment.’

VisitBritain/VisitEngland Chief Executive, Sally Balcombe said:

“As Graham’s spectacular image shows, Britain’s diverse and stunning scenery offers a visual feast in which the viewer can imagine themselves at the centre of the experience. It is a fantastic example of how images stir our emotions and fire our imaginations, motivating and inspiring us to explore new locations and landscapes.”

Congratulations also go to the winners of this year’s other Special Awards. The Network Rail ‘Lines in the Landscape’ Award was won by Jon Martin for his view of a train crossing Barmouth Viaduct over the River Mawddach in North Wales (right) and ‘Poppies in a field of linseed’ by Julian Eales, won The Sunday Times Magazine Award. Will Milner wins the Adobe Prize for his photograph of Durdle Door at night, Mark Cornick receives the Fujifilm Print Prize for his architectural view of a London building and Rachael Talibart’s seascape at Birling Gap in East Sussex is awarded the LEE Filters Prize.

The exhibition of winning entries will again be held on the Balcony at Britain’s busiest station, London Waterloo, giving thousands of visitors the chance to see the very best of the British countryside in the very heart of the capital. Opening on Monday, November 20th, the exhibition is hosted by Network Rail and will run for twelve weeks, closing on February 4th, 2018, before heading off on a tour of selected stations countrywide. Admission is free.

All the winning and commended photographs from the competition can be found in the Awards book ‘Landscape Photographer of the Year: Collection 11’ by AA Publishing, which is available now.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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These are the winners of the 2017 EyeEm Awards, the world’s largest photo competition

17 Sep
Photo © Sasha Dudkina, EyeEm 2017 Photographer of the Year

A month and a half after revealing the finalists of the 2017 EyeEm Awards, the photo sharing community and licensing marketplace has finally revealed the winners.

The 2017 EyeEm Awards have a few distinguishing factors. First, if you go by number of submissions, they are the world’s largest photo competition—over 590,000 photos were submitted by over 88,000 photographers. Second, for the first time in the awards’ short history, all of the winning images come from a full series. And finally, this year EyeEm added a Community Vote category.

Scroll down to see all of the winning series, along with a short description of the photographer and what they were trying to capture.

2017 EyeEm Photographer of the Year

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Sasha Dudkina is a 19-year-old photographer from Moscow, Russia. She shoots with a Canon 650D and occasionally her iPhone.

Sasha’s photographic style is characterized by glances and holding on to fleeting moments. She considers herself an observer, always taking in the people and events around her, often times snapping candid photos of her friends and strangers. Her photography is inspired by her home country of Russia, its literature, music, diversity of nature and especially the people.

“Sasha has been a super engaged community member since joining EyeEm in 2014,” said Brada Vivi Barassi, Head of Photography at EyeEm. “She regularly participates in Missions and shares life through her lens in a really consistent, intimate way. Sasha is brimming with potential. We’re so excited to work with her, help unleash her creativity to the full and provide support throughout her photography journey.”

The Great Outdoors Category Winner

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Guiga Pira was asked to join the crew of an anti-poaching ship as the drone pilot for a campaign to protect the most endangered marine mammal in the world from illegal fisherman. Drones were used to locate, identify and document illegal fishing activities in a protected area.

Pira said as the drone pilot in this campaign “I saw too much of the dark side of humanity in such a beautiful place. I decided to make the best of my time while flying, so every time the drones were launched I tried to capture the beautiful side of the area I was patrolling.”

The Street Photographer Category Winner

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The lead photo was taken as part of Julie Hrudova’s series, ‘LEISURE,’ which is an ongoing series Hrudova says is “core to what my work is about.” It’s a play with photography being a trustworthy and truthful medium by creating some confusion about what is actually happening in the image, or why. Hrudova says her subjects are focused on their leisure activities and often isolated.

The photos from the series are taken in Moscow, Tokyo and Amsterdam.

The Architect Category Winner

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Denise Kwong went to a popular spot in Hong Kong to shoot the markets below, when she looked to the left and saw this block of units. Kwong said: “With its lighting scheme, it was giving off a cinematic vibe and I also love how how each lit balcony made the building facade look like a sheet of negatives – each telling its own story.”

The Portraitist Category Winner

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The winning image was taken as part of Adeolu Osibodu’s series, ‘Losing Amos.’ Osibodu says: “My Grandfather Amos died in 2014. It was then that I realized how casual my idea of him was. I constantly asked myself why I couldn’t see beyond his heavy grins, why I couldn’t define him as more than the man who was never unhappy… these were unsettling thoughts that meddled with my conscience.” Osibodu decided to take a series of self-portraits wearing different clothes his grandfather owned at various times in his life.

“Maybe this is inspired by an urge to find consolation or my intimate affection for a time before, or me just being Adeolu. Regardless, I’m forever glad I happened to find myself in this state.”

The Photojournalist Category Winner

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The winning image is from Ramin Mazur’s series, “The Process,” documenting a production of Hamlet put on in a prison in Moldova.

The Republic of Moldova has one of the highest numbers of inmates per capita in Europe, including the highest rate of the long term convicted. To shed a light on the issues of penitentiary system, art centre “Coliseum” directed a play in the most secure prison in Moldova. For several months inmates were studying the craft of acting to perform on the same level as professionals from the National Theatre. Some of the inmates had already been in prison for more than half their lives. Through this play, directors Mihai Fusu and Luminita Ticu aimed to draw attention to conditions of lifers in Moldova, the penitentiary system as whole and most importantly, stereotypes.

Inmates and their right to be changed is a taboo topic among people and, paired with poor economical conditions and corrupted institutions, leaves little chance for those who want to be changed or forgiven.

The Community Vote Category Winner

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Robert Torrontegui‘s portrait series captured in Manila, Philippines was selected by the EyeEm community from all of the finalists.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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