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Posts Tagged ‘Portraiture’

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

07 Dec

I love working with natural light, I always have. Even more so now that our digital cameras have sensors so incredibly capable of making images in extremely low light. Making portraits using natural light only is a good skill to learn so you can make photographs anywhere. Here are some tips to help you mast nature light portraiture.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Be aware of the quality of light

When you want to make a series of portraits using only natural light, you first need to be aware of what the light is like at your chosen location and the style of portrait you want to make. Is the quality of light hard or soft?

If it’s a bright sunny day and the light is harsh (hard), you will get portraits with a much different look and feel, than if the sky is cloudy and overcast. Morning and evening light will give your portraits a different quality (soft light) as will photographing your subject indoors and using light from a window.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Soft side light from a window.

Hard sunlight can be quite challenging to work with, but can produce some good results if you style you portrait well. If you’re working in open sun it can be helpful to have a reflector on hand and a friend to assist you so dark shadows can be reduced.

What kind of photo do you want?

Having a concept in mind for the type of photo you want will give you a better chance of success. If you’re heading out to make some portraits on a sunny day and have an idea of making some soft dreamy romantic photos, this will be difficult. But if you want to make some photos to illustrate the idea of a journey in a hot country the light will be your friend and support your idea.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Bight, harsh sun in the middle of the day.

Cloudy days provide a soft light that’s generally easier to get a more even exposure. The flat light tends to render a softer feeling to portraits.

So if you’re making portraits with natural light on a cloudy day, you will have more success if your concept is for a gentler look. Photos taken under a cloudy sky and later converted to black and white work well as the tone range will be more limited than on a sunny day.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Portraits on a cloudy day.

Use light to your advantage

If the sky is heavily overcast you will find it challenging as the light will be very dull. On days when there’s not such thick cloud you will notice the light is still soft, but brighter and more vibrant (less flat,) so nicer for making portraits. Be careful of your exposure settings if the clouds are moving and the light value is frequently changing.

Finding a shaded space and making use of naturally reflected light will help you achieve a different look on a bright sunny day. This is not the same as the light you have on a cloudy day. Light reflecting off a wall close by or light-toned pavement, (cement rather than asphalt or dark paving,) will fill in shadows on your subject’s face and produce a more even, lively result.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Light reflecting off a nearby white wall provided fill light for this portrait.

Placing your subject so they are slightly inside a shaded area, but close to the bright sun, can allow the reflection of the sunshine to have a very helpful effect in lighting your subject. So long as your subject is not too far away from the bright light you can make use of the reflection to add a more interesting dynamic to your portraits.

The Golden Hours

Of course, making portraits with the rich morning or evening sunshine (often called Golden Hours), or even subdued light can produce very pleasing portraits. Be careful though not to have your subject look directly ahead into the sun as they will typically make an unpleasant face. Backlighting or side lighting your subject at these times can be more effective and more comfortable for your subject. Diffused morning and evening light is lovely to work with as it is soft yet can still be quite rich and warm toned.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Diffused early evening light.

Try new things

I’ve loved making natural light portraits for many years, but I also enjoy developing my technique by trying new ways of working. If you enjoy a particular aspect of photography, stick with it, develop what you do. But don’t just do the same thing every time.

If you like making portraits in natural light on a cloudy day because you find it easier, sometimes try shooting on a sunny day. Stretch yourself to learn some new technique. You may discover something new, a new way ot working that you really enjoy.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

Portable natural light studio

I have a portable natural light studio I love to take into the mountain villages here in northern Thailand. We’ve even started including it in some of the workshops we run and our customers love the professional looking results they can achieve. My outdoor studio only requires that we have space to set it up, (just a few square meters is enough,) and a sunny day for the best light, but I do use it on cloudy days too.

The best thing about it is having control over how the sun lights my subjects. I set it up so the sun is behind the backdrop. Above the backdrop is a fine gray nylon screen to filter the sunlight. The light reflects off the ground which is a light colored earth and works well with Asian skin tones, or a large plastic sheet. I have more recently introduced a large reflector too and am achieving some very pleasing results.

How to Master Natural Light Portraiture

The light coming from behind the backdrop is providing great light on these subjects’ hair as a rim light, and on their faces via reflected light.

The portable studio behind the scenes.

Your turn to try it

Next time you head out to make some portraits try something different with the light. If you prefer sunshine, make some in the shade as well. If you prefer a cloudy day challenge yourself to go out in the middle of the day when the sun is shining and find a location where you have some good light. Remember, the only time you cannot make a photo is when there is no light at all.

The post How to Master Natural Light Portraiture by Kevin Landwer-Johan appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Swimming with giants: Black and white whale portraiture by Jem Cresswell

02 Jun

Creativity showcase site My Modern Met recently interviewed Jem Cresswell, an Australian photographer who has just completed a project he calls Giants. The project is a series of portraits of humpback whales presented in black and white and offers an intimate look into the personalities and emotions of these ‘gentle giants.’

In the interview, Cresswell describes his process (much of which you can see from the behind-the-scenes video above), as well as some interesting details concerning his interactions with the whales. In addition to only swimming with ‘certain whales,’ Cresswell says they never use scuba gear and he always enters the water ‘as calmly as possible, keeping my heart rate low and wait to see the behaviour.’

The interview also addresses the presence of ‘spindle cells’ in humpback whales, which are cells that are thought to be responsible for social organization and empathy. ‘It is obvious though, that humpback whales exhibit complex emotional behaviors, have intricate social networks and complex song structures,’ says Cresswell.

Head on over to My Modern Met or Cresswell’s website to view these stunning portraits for yourself – all of which, Cresswell says, were captured on a Canon 5DS R, 24-70mm F2.8L II and 16-35mm F4L in an Aquatech underwater housing.

Via: My Modern Met

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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7 Steps to Capturing Truth in Your Portraiture

05 Sep

A stunning portrait, one that stops you in your tracks and demands attention, is a beautiful thing. There’s something magical when a portrait intrigues and connects with us. It’s not about celebrity or beauty; it’s about humanity. For my money, the moment you capture truth and humanity in your portraiture, is when photography and art collide.

DPS7

From the moment you raise a camera to take a photograph of someone, there are many variables to keep under control. It is easy to get lost and allow your focus to drift. This is the one time in photography when you need to be incredibly present.

Following this mini guide of seven steps, can help you to improve your portrait photography, and connect better with your subjects.

Step One: Photograph within your technical capabilities

The last thing you need to be worried about when you start a shoot is the technical side of things. Practice ahead of time and nail your technique. Get to know all of your equipment, and iron out any technical kinks before the day of the shoot. Your subject is bound to become nervous if you seem uneasy with your kit, or project any uncertainty. Things can still go wrong on the day, but the more relaxed you are overall, the more you will be able to handle it without panicking.

DPS2

Step Two: See images of your subject beforehand

It can be handy to see images of your subject ahead of shoot day. I like to ask clients to send me a picture of themselves which they really like. This is useful in several ways.

You can get a good idea of their skin tone and the planes of their face, which helps you to consider your lighting set up and any adjustments you will need to make. You also get a good idea of how the client wants to be perceived, and what they want an image to say about themselves.

This will not always balance with what you see in them, but herein lies the magic. As a photographer, you are seeing the subject in a new light. When you add that into the process, alongside trying to capture what they like about themselves, you make a unique portrait.

DPS1

Step Three: Have a plan

You absolutely must have a plan ahead of time. Use the what you’ve learned by having seen an image of your subject ahead of time, to help you plan your lighting and background choices. Obviously consider the weather if you are planning any natural light or outdoor shots.

It’s worth mentioning at this point that natural light doesn’t always mean you actually have to be outside. Being close to large windows or open doors can provide a beautiful light, but it absolutely depends on the weather. You should also plan what framing you might use. The goal is not to end up with a contrived shoot, it’s still important to stay in the moment. But, if session is slowing down, and you at least have some ideas in mind, you can refer back to your mental plan and get things going again by changing it up.

Author photo

Step Four: Take charge

When you lift that camera, you must take charge of your set. This is a collaborative process, but you are definitely in the driver’s seat. It’s up to you to be vocal with your subject, to keep their energy levels up, and to make sure they feel good about themselves. It’s no good just shouting out stage directions, “left a bit, chin down,”. You must encourage them, and keep them having fun, because tension is not your friend! No matter how many times your subject has been in front of a camera, each one is a new performance and needs to be directed as such.

Wherever your shoot is taking place, you are in charge of that space. Define the space in your mind, and remove as many distractions as possible. Obviously if you are shooting in a public place, a park for example, you can’t remove everything. But if you can choose an area away from the main pathways, that will make life easier.

DPS3

If you are indoors music is a must. It’s a great leveller, and helps everyone to relax. You can create a playlist specially for your shoots, include some cheesy music to put a smile on people’s faces. It’s a good idea to choose different genres/decades depending on your client’s age, style, etc.

Step Five: Learn to read people

Learning to read people is a skill you absolutely must acquire in order to progress as a people photographer. Try to connect with your subject and chat to them, tell stories – humanizing the experience is vital. The more they relax, the more you will get out of them, and the more authentic the photograph will be.

DPS5

You must learn to pick up on signs and signals: Are they losing focus? Change up the setting. Are they uncomfortable? Try standing or sitting instead. You don’t want to waste shots on unusable images, where the subject is not present or is clearly not in the zone.

Another way in which you can learn to read people has to do with their personality. Determining early on that they are nervous, might mean you tell some jokes, or explain the setup to put them at ease. A giggly, happy person definitely needs to be represented as such, but there is always room for a more serious look, which will be up to you to direct them towards.

DPS6

Step Six: Set the tone

So once you have gained control and confirmed that you are in charge, you must set the tone for the whole shoot. When you look at a portrait which you love, consider what you like about it and how you too can take this sort of image. Keeping in mind that any picture you take will have your own voice, and that develops over time. The connection or level of engagement in that photograph is entirely dictated by you, the photographer.

Your subject feeds off your energy and pace, so you must keep this in mind at all times. If they seem to be wilting, it’s your job to bring them back up to speed. Make sure to check your own performance so that you are giving out the right vibes.

DPS9

Step Seven: take your time

This last step has to be one of the most important – take your time! Please trust me on this one, slow down and keep your head in the game. A shoot can run away from you in no time, and the last thing you want is to look at back at your shots and discover you haven’t captured what you wanted. You may find that you have spent too long on one look or background, and not captured another enough. Just as you want your subject to take mini breaks to refocus themselves, you must take the opportunity too.

Personally, I know that if at the end of a shoot I don’t feel a bond with my client, I haven’t nailed it – I’ll have some great images of them but it won’t be what I set out to capture.

DPS4

Your turn

Do you do portraits? How do you inject some truth into your portraiture? Please share your tips and tricks in the comments below. If you have any questions I’ll try and answer them as well.

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The post 7 Steps to Capturing Truth in Your Portraiture by Alex Lagarejos appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Surrealism and intimacy: fine art portraiture with Fritz Liedtke

16 Feb

Professional photographer Fritz Liedtke’s work spans the worlds of film and digital, from editorial and commercial work to fine art. A native of Edmonds, WA, Liedtke became fascinated with the creative possibilities and surrealism presented by modifying the focal plane of 4×5 cameras in high school and college. In this presentation, Liedtke guides us through a recent project titled ‘Astra Velum’ (Veil of Stars), wherein he focused on photographing individuals whose faces were peppered with freckles.

‘I wanted to try to create something beautiful out of something that many people see as blemishes,’ Liedke says. Of course, not everyone feels that way about their freckles, but throughout his project, Liedtke noticed that many people he put in front of his camera didn’t necessarily feel like they fit in with the overall concept of American ‘beauty culture,’ with its focus (pun intended) on near-flawlessness.

Liedtke takes us through his post-processing and printing techniques, as well as guiding messages for those looking to start out on a personal project of their own. Keep your eyes open for interesting people to photograph, set goals for yourself, and perhaps most importantly, ‘don’t be afraid,’ Liedtke says. ‘Most people will be flattered that you want to photograph them.’

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Lens Technique: Wide-angle portraiture with the Sigma 24-35mm F2 DG HSM Art

15 Feb

Photographers tend to shy away from wide-angle lenses when shooting portraits, but DPReview Technical Editor Rishi Sanyal thinks that’s all wrong. In this video, he uses the Sigma 24-35mm F2 Art to illustrate his case for wide-angle portraits, capturing a couple of models with a setting sun in Seattle’s lovely Discovery Park. Step away from your 85mm comfort zone and learn some of Rishi’s tips for environmental portraits.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Behind the Camera: Sue Bryce’s contemporary portraiture

17 Jan

If there’s been a theme to Sue Bryce’s career, it might be one of evolution. She started making portraits when she was 18 with a Hasselblad film camera, and with grit and sheer determination she built and marketed her own business. Classifying her work as contemporary fashion portrait photography, she’s evolved through decades in a shifting industry, and in addition to running her highly successful studio now offers online workshops for newcomers. We sat down with her recently to learn more about her work, vision and history with photography. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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A light touch: Dean Bradshaw’s commercial and personal portraiture

22 Mar

‘Conceptual’ and ‘commercial’ photography are styles that relatively few are able to achieve success in, especially at the same time. But Dean Bradshaw’s intellectual and humorous approach to advertorial work sets his portfolio far above that of the typical commercial photographer. Take a look at a selection of his imagery and find out a few insights behind his success in our Q+A. See gallery

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Color Portraiture with Retouch and Enhancement in Lightroom 4 and 5

25 Aug

The Following is an excerpt from the SLR Lounge Lightroom Preset System v5, a preset system designed to take you from Ordinary to Extraordinary photos in just a few seconds and clicks.

In this article, we have a beautiful bride who designed an amazing red dress with a lot of great details and jewelry. We want to edit this photo so that she has a nice soft portrait look and the details in her dress remain sharp and crisp. To do this, we’re going to be utilizing similar techniques in production as we covered in the previous Soft Flattering Color Portrait tutorial. But, we are going to go through the added step this time of utilizing our brush presets to make the image details pop. The written article is below, and if you like, you can also watch the original video tutorial towards the end of the article.

Here’s a quick sneak peak of our image before and after we’re done with our edit.

beforeafter copy

Read the Written Tutorial

Since this is a portrait, we have a preset that gets us to a nice soft portrait look quickly which we discussed in detail in the previous Soft Flattering Color Portraits tutorial. This preset adjusts the develop settings so that portrait skin tones looks nice and soft, and it also desaturates skin tones via a slight modification to Vibrance and Saturation to help even out skin tone colors. We also increased our exposure to +0.70 because an overall brighter image will look more flattering on our bride. Personally, I want to go with a more neutral/white look for the image, so that the red in the dress truly pops. So we’re going to adjust our Temperature to 4500. Here’s what our develop settings look after our preset and manual adjustments are applied.

developesettings

In the HSL our Red and Orange have been decreased slightly because once again, we want to subtly even out skin tone colors.

HSL

  • Red: -20
  • Orange: -10

In the Details our preset gave us the perfect amount of Sharpening and Noise Reduction. The Sharpening settings are doing a great job of showing the intricate details in the dress, while using a little bit of Noise Reduction to smooth out pores and fine detail in our subjects skin.

Sharpening

  • Amount: 70
  • Radius: 1.5
  • Detail: 10
  • Masking: 30

Noise Reduction

  • Luminance: 15
  • Detail: 70
  • Contrast: 0
  • Color: 25
  • Detail: 50

Our preset also adjusted our Lens Vignetting to +30, because we want a nice even edge to edge toning.

Lens Vignetting

  • Amount: +30
  • Midpoint: 30

Now we’re going to do some more post processing with our Brush. The first thing we want to focus on is the beautiful red dress. We’re going to set our Brush settings for Clothing and Texture and apply it everywhere but her skin. If you press “O” you can bring up the brush mask overlay and see where the brush is being applied. (See video tutorial below for reference)

When you apply a brush onto your image, a “pin” will appear on your image (Press “H” on your keyboard to hide/reveal pins). If you click on the pin you can decrease or increase the strength of the brush settings by left-clicking and dragging to the left (weaken) or right (strengthen). We want our adjustments to be a little more subtle so we slightly decreased the strength of the brush.

bothclothingbrushsettings

Original Brush Settings on Left, Lowered Brush Strength Settings on Right

We like the window in the background because it helps compose our frame, but there’s a distracting bar in the middle. For this particular image, we could keep the frame since it does a great job framing our subject. But, just to illustrate how capable Lightroom is, we’re going to remove the window entirely, making this a high key image with a nice bright background. To do this we’re going to use our Brush with strong dodge settings and apply it to the window.

Screen Shot 2013-08-21 at 1.12.48 PM

If you have additional questions, watch the video tutorial below to see exactly how this affect was applied.

Dodge Brush Settings

  • Exposure: 4.00
  • Contrast: 1.00
  • Highlights: 1.00

We want to apply the brush to the inside of her hands, but it’s a tough spot to reach because the area is very small. This is a great place to use Lightroom’s Auto Mask function.

automask

Her hands are slightly underexposed so we’re going to add a graduated filter and set the exposure to +0.90. We are then going to drag the filter from the bottom left of the image to her bracelets.

firstgraduatedfilter

We also want another subtle graduated filter for the back of her veil, so we’re going to set the exposure on this filter to +0.30. We want to drag this up from the bottom right of the image to her bicep area just as we did for the previous graduated filter shown above.

Now that we’re done with the dress, we’re going to go back and touch up some details on our bride. The first thing we’re going to do is select our “Hair and Lashes” preset. This will give some nice contrast and sharpness in her eyes and eyebrows.

Hair and Lashes Brush Settings

  • Contrast: 10
  • Highlights: 20
  • Shadows: -10
  • Clarity: 15
  • Saturation: 10
  • Sharpness: 25

After the eyes, we’re going to move onto the lips. We’re going to select our Brush preset for lips which will give us some nice color and contrast on the lips.

Lip Brush Settings

  • Contrast: 15
  • Clarity: 15
  • Saturation: 20
  • Sharpness: -10
  • Noise: 10

And now we are left with our final image. Here’s a before and after of our portrait.

Before

lightroom-5-tutorial-high-key-retouch-0001

After

lightroom-5-tutorial-high-key-retouch-0002

Watch the Video Tutorial

If you would like to see exactly how all of the settings and adjustments were applied, please watch the video below from the SLR Lounge YouTube Channel.

Conclusion and Learn More

We hope you all enjoyed this tutorial. If you are interested in learning more or purchasing the SLR Lounge Lightroom Preset System v5

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Color Portraiture with Retouch and Enhancement in Lightroom 4 and 5


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How Capturing Expressive Eyes Can Be The Key To Good Portraiture

13 Aug

Paul Kostabi

If you look at some of the most famous photographs in history, such as Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother, Steve McCurry’s Afghan Girl, or much of Irving Penn’s work, you might notice there’s one thing that they have in common, a powerful emotion in the main subject’s eyes.

While this is far from a steadfast rule, if you’re doing portraiture, street photography, or photojournalism, catching a powerful expression in the eyes can be the difference between a mediocre photograph and the best photo you’ve ever taken.

If you watch a person’s eyes and wait, you can see when they are experiencing something, recalling a moment, or feeling an emotion.  That sometimes split second is when you need to take the shot.  You can create an amazing composition with gorgeous lighting, but if there is no expression coming through from the subject then the photograph will be lacking.  And that expression often begins with the eyes.

It could be a fleeting glance away from the camera as the subject recalls a story or a powerful gaze into the camera.   A momentary glance from the eyes can portray strength, fear, romance, nostalgia, confidence, glamour, and so many other emotions.

A good trick to elicit these emotions is to get the subject talking about a meaningful moment in their lives.  The more time you are able to spend with them, the more they will open up and the more opportunities you will have to capture these emotions.  Or with some, you can even simply state the emotion and they will be able to portray it (“Give me confidence!”)

So the next time you create a portrait, make sure to pay special attention to the eyes.

Pushups, Rucker Park

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

How Capturing Expressive Eyes Can Be The Key To Good Portraiture


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Awash In Light: High Key Portraiture

19 Jul
This shot was done using a tradition speedlight setup.  I used 4 speedlights- two on the background with no modifiers, and two in softboxes on the subject.

This shot was done using a tradition speedlight setup. I used 4 speedlights- two on the background with no modifiers, and two in softboxes on the subject.

This is the lighting setup used for the first image above. Exposure was f/4, 1/250, ISO 400. The background lights were Canon 430 EX II speedlites, and the main and fill were 580 EX II speedlites.

This is the lighting setup used for the first image above. Exposure was f/4, 1/250, ISO 400. The background lights were Canon 430 EX II speedlites, and the main and fill were 580 EX II speedlites.

When shooting portraits, the very first decision I make is what look I’m going for. The answer to that question lies directly in how I want to light the scene.  Generally, I want to evoke a mood or a feeling.  Low key portraiture which has dramatic lighting, tends to be very moody, while high key portraiture will have a more even light, with very few harsh shadows.  High key lighting tends to make the scene much more upbeat.

The problem with high key lighting is that, indoors, it can be costly to achieve.  First, you need a white or light colored background.  Seamless paper will work best, but I’ve also found that I can get away with flat bedsheets; one hung from a background stand and another on the floor, with the two meeting . When done right the seam can be hidden nicely.  of course, a light colored muslin will work as well.  Once the background is set, you need to light the background evenly.  This requires at least two lights to light it evenly.   Once the background has been lit, you need to light your subject.  Using softbox for the main light and a smaller softbox for the fill, you can adjust the lighting to have some soft shadow on your subject if you prefer, or you even the lighting out if you want to eliminate shadow altogether.  A reflector can also help kick more light into your subject’s face and further soften shadows.

High key lighting can be also be achieved outdoors, and at lesser cost as well.  If the light is flat and even, a simple metallic reflector can be used to fill any shadows that occur.  I find bright cloudy days perfect for this type of shooting.  By the same token, a sunny day will work well also. A scrim can be used to soften the sunlight on the subject, while the sunlight brightly lights the background and creates that high key look.

For this shot, I ventured away from the setup above, and used a 50-inch softbox with a Canon 580 EX II speedlite. This was positioned on the far side of the subject- her left. To camera right, I used a large silver reflector to fill the shadows. I used white sheets as a background on the floor to complete the scene.

For this shot, I ventured away from the setup above, and used a 50-inch softbox with a Canon 580 EX II speedlite. This was positioned on the far side of the subject- her left. To camera right, I used a large silver reflector to fill the shadows. I used white sheets as a background on the floor to complete the scene.

As far as camera settings go, it’s important to note that a high key image is not simply overexposed. You’ll want to watch your histogram to keep from clipping the highlights, but you will want to keep your exposure to the right on the histogram to ensure that the shows aren’t too deep.  if I’m indoors, I’m using either studio lights or speedlights and using them to generate my exposure.  Outdoors, I’ll shoot on aperture priority and use exposure compensation to push my exposure where I want it, again, careful not to clip the highlights.

I find high key portraiture a great way to photograph children or adults.  It brings a happy, upbeat mood to the scene, and can also give an edgy look to things.   Ultimately, it will take some experimentation to get the lighting the way you like it, but once you do, it’s another technique in your pocket to work with and use to create images. Happy shooting!

This shot was taken outdoors. It was a bright day but the sun was diffused by a thin layer of clouds, making it very soft and even.  Canon EOS 1D X, EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS II. 1/320, f/2.8, ISO 200.

This shot was taken outdoors. It was a bright day but the sun was diffused by a thin layer of clouds, making it very soft and even. Canon EOS 1D X, EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS II. 1/320, f/2.8, ISO 200.

This was another bright day.  This image was taken at the beach, and a light fog rolled in to diffuse the bright sun. A reflector positioned right next to the camera further softened shadows. Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF 85mm f/1.2L. ISO 100, 1/8000, f/1.2.

This was another bright day. This image was taken at the beach, and a light fog rolled in to diffuse the bright sun. A reflector positioned right next to the camera further softened shadows. Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF 85mm f/1.2L. ISO 100, 1/8000, f/1.2.

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Awash In Light: High Key Portraiture


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