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Posts Tagged ‘Kodak’

Kodak Alaris is bringing back T-Max P3200 high-speed B&W film

24 Feb

Film photographers are celebrating today after news broke that Kodak Alaris will resurrect another popular product: Kodak T-Max P3200 high-speed black-and-white film. After teasing the resurrection on Twitter, a brief press release confirmed the news this morning, revealing that the debut will happen some time next month.

Kodak originally discontinued T-Max P3200 film in October of 2012 due to a severe drop in demand, directing its customers toward the T-Max 400 as an alternative. However, the film photography market has seen an increase in demand over the last few years, and Kodak Alaris is using that demand as proof that products like T-Max P3200 and the soon-to-be-rereleased Ektachrome film deserve another shot.

The ‘rebirth’ of T-Max P3200 began on social media. In a tweet posted yesterday, Kodak shared an image that reads “Are you in the dark?” followed by a series of numbers that total 3200. The combination hinted at the T-Max P3200 film, which Kodak says can be push processed up to ISO 25,000.

Though the company didn’t provide any additional details via that tweet, someone did spot an image shared by Australian film store Ikigai Camera on its Instagram account. The image—which has since been removed, hinting at an ‘accidental’ leak—showed the T-Max P3200 film box alongside the words, “Welcome back March 2018.”

Screenshot from the Kodak Alaris website.

Fortunately, it’s not just teasers and leaks anymore. The company followed up the unofficial news with an official announcement earlier today, saying it will begin shipping the product to US stockhouse dealers and distributors starting in March, followed by other markets “shortly thereafter.”

The company says the resurrected film is best suited for handheld street photography, as well as night shots and work in any “dimly lit venues where you can’t use a flash.”

Press Release

{PressRelease}

Kodak Alaris Revives KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX P3200 Film / TMZ

Multi-Speed B&W Film to be Available in March, 2018

ROCHESTER, N.Y. February 23, 2018Kodak Alaris announced today that it is bringing back KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX P3200 Film / TMZ, a multi-speed panchromatic black-and-white negative film. While the nominal film speed of P3200 TMZ is ISO 800, the “P” means it’s designed to be push processed to EI 3200 or higher. This film excels when shooting in low light or when capturing fast action. It is ideally suited for handheld street scene photography, night work, and in dimly lit venues where you can’t use flash.

“It’s no secret that we’ve been looking for opportunities to expand our portfolio” said Dennis Olbrich, President – Kodak Alaris Paper, Photo Chemicals and Film. “Darkroom photography is making a comeback, and B&W Film sales are clearly on a positive trajectory. Given these very encouraging market trends, we believe P3200 TMZ will be a great addition to our lineup”.

Kodak Alaris plans to offer KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX P3200 Film in 135-36x format. Shipments to Distributors and Stockhouse dealers will begin in March in the U.S., with other regions around the world following shortly thereafter.

To learn more, please visit www.kodakalaris.com/go/profilms

Follow us on Twitter @kodakprofilmbiz and Instagram @KodakProfessional

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/kodakprofessional

{/PressRelease}

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak says over 40,000 investors are interested in its cryptocurrency

01 Feb

In a statement released today, Kodak said more than 40,000 potential investors are interested in the company’s recently announced KODAKCoin Initial Coin Offering (ICO). The cryptocurrency was introduced in early January alongside the company’s new KODAKOne blockchain-based image rights platform for photographers.

Of course, it’s not really Kodak’s cryptocurrency, just cryptocurrency with the Kodak name attached, but you can read about all that below before moving on.

Ready to move on? Okay.

The company explains that it is beginning an “accredited investor” phase for KODAKCoin that will verify the status of the investors who have expressed interest in Kodak’s cryptocurrency. This won’t be a rapid process, though, and Kodak expects the verification phase to take several weeks.

The company explains that an accredited investor status is dependent on the potential investor’s income, requiring an individual or couple to have a net worth greater than $ 1 million or requiring a minimum 2-year history of income exceeding $ 200k a year ($ 300k for couples). The ICO will also be available to “select non-US persons.”

In short: if you thought (or hoped) this whole Kodak Cryptocurrency thing was just a marketing stunt to help juice the stock and get people talking, it doesn’t look that way.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak Super 8 camera footage showcased in newly published sample reel

17 Jan

During CES 2016, Kodak announced plans to resurrect its Super 8 format via the launch of a new Kodak Super 8 camera, one that will blend analog and digital technologies. Following that announcement was a hands-on look at the new Super 8 camera during CES 2017, but an actual product launch is still forthcoming. Getting us closer to that point is Kodak’s latest update on the project: it’s showcasing footage recorded with the Super 8 camera during CES 2018.

The new Kodak Super 8 camera is a hybrid of sorts, pairing a 3.5″ LCD “viewfinder” with an 8mm film cartridge for a simultaneous digital and analog experience. A control wheel is paired with the display for controlling the camera in lieu of touchscreen functionality or manual controls. This is joined by a Ricoh 6mm F1.2 prime lens and C-mount compatible with additional lenses.

True to its hybrid nature, the new Kodak Super 8 camera also features an integrated SD card slot; audio is recorded to the media card, whereas the film cartridge is mailed to Kodak after recording is finished. After developing the film, Kodak mails it back to the customer, and also uploads the content to the cloud where the customer can download a digitized version.

As noted by Cinema5D, Kodak also released a podcast about a month ago with an update on the Super 8 project. A firm launch date and price haven’t yet been provided, but the Kodak Super 8 camera is expected to launch this year at a price between $ 2,500 and $ 3,000 USD.

Via: Cinema5D

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak Scanza is a portable, budget film scanner that turns negatives into JPEGs

14 Jan

Kodak has launched a new budget scanner that digitizes film and slides. The scanner, called the Kodak Scanza, is compact at just 12cm x 12.7cm (4.7in x 5in), and features: a 3.5-inch color screen, an integrated SD card slot for saving scanned content, adapter trays for different types of film, and an HDMI port for viewing scanned content directly on an external display.

Kodak Scanza, which was introduced at CES 2018, supports 35mm, 110, Super 8, and 8mm film negatives and slides via inserts and adapters. Content is scanned as 14MP JPEGs, though users can enlarge the resolution up to 22MP.

The integrated screen, which is hinged for tilting, provides access to pre-scanning options, such as exposure and color adjustments.

Both Windows and macOS are supported out-of-the-box, and scanned content can either be saved to a compute, or directly to an SD card inserted into the scanner’s built-in card reader. Kodak Scanza will be available to purchase from Amazon for $ 170 USD. Availability and pricing in other regions is unclear at this time.

To learn more about the scanner, visit the Kodak Scanza landing page.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak didn’t get into cryptocurrency and bitcoin mining, “Kodak” did

12 Jan

Kodak’s CES announcements tell an interesting tale of the power of brands, and what happens to those brands when you start licensing them to other companies.

A lot of people still have positive associations with the Kodak brand and its iconic logos, but it’s worth clearing something up, especially in light of all the cryptocurrency madness that Kodak unleashed at CES: not everything with the Kodak name on it has much connection to a bunch of clever people in Rochester New York.

The parent company, Eastman Kodak, left the consumer photography business in 2012 following court-overseen ‘Chapter 11’ restructuring. Its remaining consumer photo businesses were sold to Kodak Alaris, which continues to sell photo film and printing kiosks.

So it’s worth keeping your fond memories of that company at arms length when you read about its apparent embrace of the blockchain.

The “Kodak” KashMiner, yours to rent for just $ 3,400 and a two year contract.

At CES this year ‘Kodak’ announced both blockchain-based IP protection and cryptocurrency projects, and a scheme that apparently lets you buy a Bitcoin-mining farm for them. However, the KodakOne project appears to be as much a rebranding of an existing project called RYDE as it does a “partnership between Kodak and [RYDE owner] Wenn Media”. Meanwhile, the Kodak KashMiner scheme, which lets you rent the hardware to mine the more famous Bitcoin cryptocurrency appears to be entirely separate: essentially an unconventional investment scheme using industry-standard hardware with the Kodak logo stuck on the side so that there’s something to show at CES.

Essentially, these look a lot like Kodak licensing its name to other companies in much the same way as the current holders of the Polaroid, Rollei and Vivitar names accept fees to let those names get emblazoned on, well, pretty much anything.

Eastman Kodak still makes film, but it appears to have only two customers: Hollywood and Kodak Alaris.

The Kodak PixPro Orbit360 4K VR camera, by JK Imaging

Then, of course, there are the cameras. You can still buy ‘Kodak’ cameras: JK Imaging, a California-based company, sells cameras under the Kodak brand. Interestingly, JK Imaging shares and address with General Imaging, which licensed the General Electric brand for its photo products.

Given the way that even the largest names in photography regularly use third-party ‘OEM’ manufacturers to produce some of their models, it’s senseless to try and draw a line between ‘real’ Kodak and licensees of the brand name. That the red and yellow logo doesn’t necessarily tie anything back to your fuzzy memories of Kodachrome, or brilliant developments such as the Bayer color filter.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak unveiled its own bitcoin miner at CES, will let you rent it for $3,400 for two years

12 Jan

If you thought Kodak news couldn’t get any stranger following the company’s debut of a “photo-centric cryptocurrency” called KODAKCoin earlier this week… you were wrong. In a further attempt to cash in on the cryptocurrency mania currently spreading across the world, Kodak has debuted its own bitcoin mining machine at CES.

The bitcoin miner is called the Kodak KashMiner, and you can rent it for just $ 3,400 and keep a share of the profits you make mining bitcoin for the next 2 years.

We’ll give you a moment to let the absurdity of those last few sentences soak in before we attempt to put this madness in context.

Ready to move on? Okay.

First of all, here is the Kodak KashMiner in the flesh at CES 2018:

The deal, according to the pictures of Kodak’s pamphlet about the KashMiner, is that you can rent the machine on a 2-year contract for $ 3,400. From there, contends Kodak—who clearly know their stuff, having been publically interested in cryptocurrency for a full 48 hours now—you will earn approximately $ 750 per month, half of which you get to keep while the other half goes to a company called Spotlite Energy Systems in California.

At that rate ($ 375 per month), you’ll make $ 9,000 in 24 months, or approximately $ 5,600 in profit.

There’s just one problem with that line of thinking. Okay, actually, there are a few, as many people with actual cryptocurrency mining knowhow pointed out on the twittersphere as soon as news of Kodak’s bitcoin mining machine hit the headlines.

Basically, bitcoin mining will not produce the same output month after month for 2 full years, even in the unlikely even that the price stays at $ 14,000 per bitcoin. According to bitcoin economist Saifedean Ammous, mining difficulty is increasing by about 15% per month, which means your total output after 24 months will be a lot less than the advertised $ 9,000+. But even if Kodak’s numbers were correct, there’s one other problem.

It seems the KashMiner that Kodak is so graciously offering to rent you for $ 1,700 per year is just a rebranded Bitmain Antminer S9, an industry standard bitcoin miner that you can buy outright for just $ 2,320—a full $ 1,080 less than Kodak’s 2-year rental fee.

The Bitmain Antminer S9

Kodak’s initial cryptocurrency and blockchain announcement on Monday seemed, if a bit strange, at least not entirely crazy.

Using the blockchain for copyright registration and tracking makes sense (and has been done before), and if Kodak wants to create its own cryptocurrency for photographers, it’s a risk the company is more than welcome to take. In fact, at first, it seemed like a risk that was well worth taking, as Kodak’s stock more than tripled on the news.

But this bitcoin mining rental scheme feels like something else entirely. If the bitcoin experts speaking out about this online are correct, either Kodak has no idea what it’s doing, or this is a full-blown bitcoin mining scam.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak launches KODAKCoin ‘photo-centric cryptocurrency’ and KODAKOne platform

10 Jan

Amidst all of the CES 2018 news big and small, Kodak managed to drop what might be the most shocking announcement of the week: together with WENN Digital, Kodak will be launching its own “photo-centric cryptocurrency” called KODAKCoin alongside a blockchain-powered image rights platform called KODAKOne.

The cryptocurrency and platform are meant to “empower photographers and agencies to take greater control in image rights management.”

The KODAKOne platform does this the same way Binded (formerly Blokai) does: by using blockchain technology to create an “encrypted, digital ledger of rights ownership” where photographers can simply and securely register their new and old work. The difference being, of course, that Kodak is setting up its OWN blockchain and cryptocurrency rather than piggybacking upon an existing one.

Once registered, photographers can license their work through the KODAKOne platform, and the platform will continually crawl the web and monitor for infringement of registered images.

The KODAKCoin cryptocurrency, meanwhile, is meant to create a “new economy for photography.” Images licensed through KODAKOne will be paid for in KODAKCoin, which Wenn and Kodak both promise is “subject to the highest standards of compliance.” A cryptocurrency for photographers, with digital rights management built right in.

For now, if you visit the KODAKCoin website, you’ll be greeted by the splash screen below, but that should be gone with the day:

“For many in the tech industry, ‘blockchain’ and ‘cryptocurrency’ are hot buzzwords, but for photographers who’ve long struggled to assert control over their work and how it’s used, these buzzwords are the keys to solving what felt like an unsolvable problem,” says Kodak CEO Jeff Clarke. “Kodak has always sought to democratize photography and make licensing fair to artists. These technologies give the photography community an innovative and easy way to do just that.”

Of course, all of this is predicated on the idea that the KODAKCoin launch actually goes well. The SEC Regulated Initial Coin Offering for KODAKCoin is scheduled for January 31st, and open to “accredited investors” from the US, UK, Canada and a few other unnamed “select countries.”

To learn more about KODAKOne and KODAKCoin, visit the main Kodak website for now, or check out the official KODAKCoin website when it launches in 24 hours’ time.

Press Release

KODAK and WENN Digital Partner to Launch Major Blockchain Initiative and Cryptocurrency

KODAKOne platform and KODAKCoin cryptocurrency give photographers a new revenue stream and a secure platform for protecting their work

ROCHESTER, N.Y. – Today Kodak and WENN Digital, in a licensing partnership, announced the launch of the KODAKOne image rights management platform and KODAKCoin, a photo-centric cryptocurrency to empower photographers and agencies to take greater control in image rights management.

Utilizing blockchain technology, the KODAKOne platform will create an encrypted, digital ledger of rights ownership for photographers to register both new and archive work that they can then license within the platform. With KODAKCoin, participating photographers are invited to take part in a new economy for photography, receive payment for licensing their work immediately upon sale, and for both professional and amateur photographers, sell their work confidently on a secure blockchain platform. KODAKOne platform provides continual web crawling in order to monitor and protect the IP of the images registered in the KODAKOne system. Where unlicensed usage of images is detected, the KODAKOne platform can efficiently manage the post-licensing process in order to reward photographers.

“For many in the tech industry, ‘blockchain’ and ‘cryptocurrency’ are hot buzzwords, but for photographers who’ve long struggled to assert control over their work and how it’s used, these buzzwords are the keys to solving what felt like an unsolvable problem,” said Kodak CEO Jeff Clarke. “Kodak has always sought to democratize photography and make licensing fair to artists. These technologies give the photography community an innovative and easy way to do just that.”

“Engaging with a new platform, it is critical photographers know their work and their income is handled securely and with trust, which is exactly what we did with KODAKCoin,” said WENN Digital CEO Jan Denecke. “Subject to the highest standards of compliance, KODAKCoin is all about paying photographers fairly and giving them an opportunity to get in on the ground floor of a new economy tailored for them, with secure asset rights management built right in.”

The initial coin offering will open on January 31, 2018 and is open to accredited investors from the U.S., UK, Canada and other select countries. For more information visit www.kodakcoin.com. This initial Coin Offering is issued under SEC guidelines as a security token under Regulation 506 (c) as an exempt offering.

For more information and to sign up for product updates, please visit www.kodak.com/go/kodakone.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak reveals how and when it’s bringing back 35mm Ektachrome film

17 Nov
Photo: Kodak

Kodak first announced the rebirth of Ektachrome way back in January at CES. Along with Kodak Alaris—who will distribute the 35mm Kodak Professional Ektachrome film for stills shooters—the company said it would bring back Ektachrome by the end of 2017… and then promptly stopped talking about it.

But if you were worried that Kodak had given up on the idea, fear not: in a new episode of the Kodakery podcast, a few of Kodak’s higher ups (including Marketing and Product Manager Diane Carroll-Yacoby) updated the world on the progress of the Ektachrome reboot, how they’re making it, and what testing still stand between your hands and a fresh 36-shot roll of the stuff.

You can listen to the entire Kodakery podcast update below:

The first half of the podcast is mostly a photography and history lesson: discussing the origins of Ektachrome, its ‘characteristics’ (read: limitations), and how Kodak has managed to bring it back to life after discontinuing it in 2013. But if you want to get into the “how and when” of the matter, you’ll want to skip to the 22 minute mark.

That’s where we get to learn about how difficult it is to bring back a film like Ektachrome—which is made up of 80 ingredients, some of them no longer available to purchase—and how Kodak is making the economics of Ektachrome work by creating it in smaller, more sustainable batches.

You’ll want to listen to the discussion to really get the details of how the film is made, but here are a few of the most interesting tidbits about the revival process (for us anyway):

  • Kodak has managed to either find or manufacture all 80 ingredients required to make Ektachrome.
  • Much of the process so far has involved retooling the formula so it will work on the machines available to them, because they no longer have all of the equipment they had when Ektachrome was being developed previously.
  • They’ve already produced some ‘pilot coatings’ that they are testing to ensure they’re ready to mass produce Ektachrome that’s up to snuff.
  • When they’re ready to go, they will be making rolls using a coater that produces the film on sheets that are 4 feet wide and 6,000 feet long. The first of these ‘wide’ rolls will be produced before the end of 2017, and will be used for internal testing.
  • Kodak will be making a single (4ft x 6,000ft) roll for the first production run, so they don’t have to hold on to too much inventory at one time.
  • Kodak Ektachrome’s market release is planned for 2018.

Eastman Kodak itself will produce all of the film and plans to distribute the Super 8 cinema version of Ektachrome, while Kodak Alaris will distribute the 35mm slide film for stills shooters. For now, we still don’t know exactly when Ektachrome is coming back in 2018, but as soon as we do, we’ll let you know so you can mark your calendars.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak will lay off 425 employees after reporting millions in losses

14 Nov

Kodak recently disclosed its third quarter fiscal results, revealing that it had a GAAP net loss of $ 46 million on $ 379 million in revenues during its Q3 2017. This marks a sharp downturn of fortunes for Kodak, which saw $ 12 million in net earnings during the same quarter last year. “An overall print market slowdown and rising aluminum costs have impacted our commercial print business,” explained Kodak CEO Jeff Clarke in a release.

Clarke went on to explain that Kodak is, “taking immediate actions to accelerate cost reduction and reduce investments to sharpen our focus as we continue to actively pursue changes to the Kodak product and divisional portfolio.” According to New York Upstate, “accelerate cost reduction” translates to the Eastman Kodak Company cutting 425 jobs.

The quarter had its upsides for Kodak, however, which reports that its Kodak Sonora Plates saw a 24% growth in Q3 and its Flexcel NX revenue grew 2% year-on-year. Overall, Kodak’s CFO David Bullwinkle said the company anticipates generating cash during Q4 2017. “We plan to improve our cash balance through reducing working capital and through cost actions,” Bullwinkle explained, “including focusing investments in technologies most likely to deliver near-term returns.”

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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This Kodak Moments chatbot digs through your old photos and tries to sell you prints

23 Sep

Kodak has created a new Facebook Messenger chatbot called ‘Kodak Moments’ that tries to get users to buy physical products by digging through and resurfacing their old photos.

The AI algorithm works by searching through the mass of images a user has uploaded to Facebook and suggesting ones that may have been forgotten in hopes the user, when suddenly presented with this fond old memory (or Kodak moment… if you will), will order it as a physical print or photo product like a coffee mug.

Facebook users are given the option of either dismissing the chatbot’s suggested image, requesting other images that contain the same people as the first image, or requesting a print or product containing the selected image. All you have to do to join this ‘fun’ game that tries to sell you things is search for Kodak Moments in the Messenger app.

Unfortunately, the chatbot—at least in its current iteration—doesn’t support any sort of filtering options, making it impossible to prevent the bot from digging up photos of old memories better left forgotten. Consider yourself warned.

Joining this Messenger chatbot is a new Kodak Moments app (Android | iOS) that goes a bit further. After being given permission, the app will search through a Facebook or Google account and camera roll to find images it thinks users may want to turn into physical products.

The goal behind the new Kodak Moments technology is (obviously) to increase the company’s print sales while reviving the idea of a ‘Kodak Moment’ and helping customers sort through their possibly massive photo albums. We’ll let you decide if the concept is fun, annoying, or maybe a bit traumatizing.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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