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Posts Tagged ‘Fujifilm’

Fujifilm interview: ‘We want the X-H1 to be friendly for DSLR users’

21 Feb

Fujifilm’s new X-H1 sits above the X-T2 in the company’s X-series APS-C lineup. As well as offering several enhancements in its core stills photography feature set, the X-H1 also brings high-end 4K video capture with up to 200Mbps capture and 5-axis in-body stabilization.

At the X-H1’s launch in Los Angeles last week, we sat down with the camera’s product manager, Jun Watanabe, to get a detailed look at the new camera. The following interview has been edited for clarity and flow.


Jun Watanabe is the Manager of Product Planning in the Sales & Marketing group of the Optical Device & Electronic Imaging Products Division at Fujifilm.

Fujifilm has stated previously that IBIS would not be possible in X-series cameras because of the small imaging circle of some XF lenses. What changed?

We have spent the past two or three years developing a system where using both hardware and software, we can cover [the necessary] imaging circle. The most important thing is precision. Because a sensor with IBIS is a floating device, it has to be perfectly centered and perfectly flat. We had already achieved a sensor flatness tolerance down to an order of microns, but the challenge was to maintain this precision with IBIS.

A laser measurement device is used during the process of manufacturing the image stabilization unit, and the assembly process also includes inspection and adjustment of each individual camera. For that reason, a micron order level of sensor parallelism is realized even while IBIS is activated.

A chart showing CIPA figures for image stabilization benefit of all compatible XF lenses, when used with the X-H1. As you can see, the least amount of benefit comes when the 10-24mm wideangle zoom is used. Users of the vast majority of XF lenses should see 5 stops of stabilization benefit.

Are there some lenses that will deliver better stabilization than others, as a result of having a larger imaging circle?

Yes. The most effective is the 35mm F1.4. But every XF lens without OIS will benefit from five stops of stabilization.

When you were developing the X-H1, how important was the requirement to add high-end video features?

Many videographers gave us input. A lot of them said they needed in-body stabilization, and F-Log in-camera recording. Those were the top requests from video users.

Compared to the X-T2, the X-H1 is a larger, more DSLR-styled camera which inherits a lot of styling cues from the medium-format GFX 50S. It is also 25% thicker, and better sealed against the elements.

What kind of feedback have you had from videographers since the X-H1 was announced?

Pretty good. We’ve heard from videographers that they really like the 200Mb/s internal recording and 12 stops of dynamic range with the Eterna film simulation. They’ve told us that this combination is the best solution for quick, high-quality video capture.

We wanted to create a more cinematic look, so we studied ‘Eterna’ – one of our cine film emulsions

We received a lot of feedback after we launched the X-T2, from videographers and DPs who said that our film simulation modes in video were unique, but too still photography oriented, with the narrow dynamic range. They wanted a real cinema look. On the product planning side we wanted to create a more cinematic look, so we studied one of our cine film emulsions – ‘Eterna’. That was the starting point.

Velvia is tuned to give you colors as you remembered them. More vivid blue skies, for example. Eterna is tuned in the opposite direction, for moderate saturation, with more cyan and green bias. With Eterna, combined with the X-H1’s dynamic range settings, we have achieved a 12 stop dynamic range.

How did you decide on what video features to include in the camera? Some expected features – like zebra – are missing.

Honestly, we couldn’t add zebra because of hardware constraints. The processor cannot support it. It requires too much processing power. At this time, we’ve achieved the best possible performance for the processor.

The X-H1 (on the left) features a substantially deeper handgrip than the X-T2, which we’re told was a major feature request from existing X-series customers. It also sports a top-plate mounted LCD, which should make it more familiar to photographers coming from using an enthusiast DSLR.

Is 8-bit capture enough, for F-Log recording?

There are 10-bit cameras on the market, but we recommend using Eterna to short-cut the recording process. We think 8-bit is enough for good quality.

Do you think the X-H1 will be bought mostly by stills photographers, or videographers?

We are targeting both. We have greatly upgraded the video performance [compared to the X-T2] but we have upgraded the stills performance too, especially autofocus in low light, and subject tracking. We also added flicker reduction and dynamic range priority, and so on. We are targeting both kinds of professional users.

When it comes to autofocus, minimum low light AF response has been improved from 0.5EV to -1EV. We’ve also introduced a new phase-detection autofocus algorithm and parallel data processing. The X-H1 has the same processor as the X-T2 but the algorithms are new. A single autofocus point in the X-T2 was divided into 5 zones. In the X-H1, this has been increased to 20 zones.

Phase-detection autofocus will be possible with our 100-400mm lens in combination with a 2X teleconverter

Data from each zone is processed in three ways, for horizontal detail, vertical detail, and fine, natural detail like foliage or a bird’s feathers. This processing happens simultaneously, rather than in series, which is a big advantage over the X-T2. We’ve also achieved phase-detection performance down to F11, which means that phase-detection autofocus will be possible with our 100-400mm lens in combination with a 2X teleconverter, with a much higher hit-rate compared to the X-T2.

During shooting, the predictive AF algorithm now generates information from captured images in a sequence, for more reliable subject tracking while zooming.

Now that you have a powerful 4K-capable video camera with IBIS, how will this change how you develop lenses, in the future?

For stills lenses, our approach will stay the same. But we’ve also announced two cinema lenses. These both work with IBIS and the MKX 18-55mm zoom will deliver 5 stops of correction. This is a unique selling point.

We have had requests from some of our professional users for a bigger camera

The X-H1 is considerably larger than its predecessors. Is there a point when the size advantage of APS-C compared to full-frame gets lost?

Professionals are generally more accepting of larger cameras, and [compared to DSLRs] the X-H1 isn’t that big. And we have had requests from some of our professional users for a bigger camera, especially those photographers that use our longer lenses. A bigger grip and more solid body were both requested.

Here’s that deeper handgrip, in action.

When the camera gets bigger, does it make some aspects of design easier? Like heat management?

Yes, the increased camera volume gives us some advantages when it comes to heat and cooling systems. In fact the X-H1’s 4K recording time is 50% longer than the X-T2, thanks to a new cooling system and two large copper heat sinks.

How much technology from the GFX 50S has made it into the X-H1?

Some of the operation and operability improvements have made their way into this camera. We hope that some DSLRs users will come over to the X-series, thanks to things like the top LCD, and twin control dials and so on. We wanted the X-H1 to be ‘friendly’ to photographers who are used to DSLRs.


Editor’s note:

I always enjoy talking to engineers, even with the caveat that some of what they say occasionally goes completely over my head. I was very surprised, for instance, after hearing Mr. Watanabe detail all of the clever ways in which the X-H1 processes AF information, to be told that the new camera has the same processor as the X-T2.

It’s not impossible to imagine that the X-T2 might yet benefit from some of these advances.

Quite how Fujifilm has managed to eke such increased efficiency from essentially the same amount of computing power is beyond my intellect, but if the claimed increase in performance holds up in our testing, the company deserves a lot of credit. And given Fujifilm’s excellent track record of updating older models, it’s not impossible to imagine that the X-T2 might yet benefit from some of these advances.

Apparently there were internal discussions about including a dual, or even a completely new processor in the X-H1, but this would have added to development time, as well as cost. It’s possible too that some of the heat-management benefits of the X-H1’s larger internal volume compared to the X-T2 might have been nullified.

‘Silent control’ in movie shooting allows you to adjust exposure settings by touching the rear LCD – avoiding the noise and vibration of clicky buttons and dials making its way into your footage.

And in these days of 4K video capture, heat matters. The X-H1 isn’t a perfect video camera by any means, but it’s the most convincing X-series model yet. It should compare well against most of its competitors, barring only the more specialized Panasonic GH5/S. In-camera 5-axis stabilization is a big part of that (involving 10,000 calculations per second, if you can believe it), but features like 12EV of video dynamic range (Eterna + DR400%), internal F-log recording and a maximum quality of 200 Mbps are sure to attract the attention of professional, as well as casual videographers.

One of the most requested features from Fujifilm’s X-series customers was a bigger grip

Even for people with little or no interest in video, the X-H1’s enhanced feature set might still be enough to justify the extra cost over the X-T2. And possibly also its ergonomics. According to Mr. Watanabe, one of the most requested features from Fujifilm’s X-series customers was a bigger grip. The X-H1 gets bigger everythings, just about. Obviously this means that the camera is bigger as a result, but Fujifilm is hoping that this will make the X-H1 appeal to more traditional DSLR users.

Will the X-H1 prove a hit? I hope so. It’s an impressive camera, and a bold move by Fujifilm. I can’t see the company creating a dedicated video camera any time soon (and Mr. Watanabe would not be drawn on this question when I asked him) but however it gets there, one thing is clear: Fujifilm really wants to be taken seriously by filmmakers, as well as traditional stills photographers.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Fujifilm X-H1: What you need to know

17 Feb

Introduction

The Fujifilm X-H1 arrived in the last few hours of February 14th, at least out here on the West Coast in the US, making it a Valentine’s gift that came in just under the wire for the Fujifilm faithful. It’s deserving of a big red bow with a range-topping APS-C 24MP X-Trans sensor, sitting above the X-T2. It builds on many of the X-T2’s features by adding in-body image stabilization, a touchscreen and enhanced video options. Here’s a detailed look at everything that’s new and improved.

Image Quality

Given the camera’s pedigree and the initial results we’ve seen, the X-H1 looks highly capable of great image quality. The sensor, shared with the X-T2, has already shown itself to have performance comparable with the best of its APS-C peers, both in terms of dynamic range and noise performance at high ISO settings.

Throw in Fujifilm’s excellent film simulation modes (plus a bonus new one!), and you’ve got a mighty tempting camera for stills shooters. However, the camera’s unique X-Trans color filter pattern is worth taking into account – your results will vary greatly depending on your Raw conversion software.

Further enticing stills photographers is the X-H1’s healthy 14 fps burst rate with electronic shutter and 8 fps with mechanical shutter (which can be boosted to 11 with an optional grip). Buffer depth looks reasonably good too, allowing for 40 JPEG shots or 23 uncompressed Raws (27 compressed). Fujifilm also promises autofocus improvement, with better performance in low light and at smaller apertures. All excellent news.

Image Stabilization

Despite Fujifilm previously suggesting that it couldn’t be done, the X-H1 offers in-body stabilization rated up to 5 stops. Unusually, Fujifilm says the system works better with non-IS lenses because they project a larger image circle and tend to be neither too long nor too wide, both of which are harder to stabilize. With such a lens, up to 5.5 stops of stabilization can be achieved.

Viewfinder and rear LCD

Comparing to the X-T2, the X-H1 gets a higher resolution viewfinder: a 3.69 million dot OLED panel with 0.75x magnification to the X-T2’s 2.36 million dots and 0.77x magnification. Like the X-T2, the X-H1 provides a 3″ 1.04 million dot rear LCD that tilts upwards and downwards, but of course, adds touch sensitivity where the X-T2 has none.

The X-H1, like the X-T2, also comes with a ‘Boost’ mode that increases the viewfinder refresh rate from 60Hz to 100Hz for a smoother look.

Touchscreen

The X-H1’s touchscreen is all-around nice to have, allowing you to place a focus point with a tap, tap and acquire focus, or acquire focus and shoot all with one touch. It’s also usable as a touchpad with the camera to your eye. That said, we have a word of caution – in our initial use of the touchscreen both setting focus points and touchpad operation, the screen has felt noticeably laggy.

The LCD also provides touch control of the camera’s Q.Menu, and in playback mode offers quick access to 100% image viewing, along with gesture-controlled swiping and scrolling. As in the X-E3, a swipe across the shooting screen acts as a Fn button shortcut.

Video specs

The latest generation of flagship mirrorless cameras take video very seriously, and Fujifilm has definitely gotten the memo. The X-H1 offers DCI 4K in 23.98p and 24p, as well as UHD 4K in 23.98/24/25/29.97p. Where the X-T2 requires an external recorder to use flat Log capture, the X-H1 allows for internal F-Log recording. The camera offers bitrates of up to 200 Mbps and 24-bit audio (vs 16-bit on the X-T2).

Plenty of other goodies are on offer for videographers, like a new Eterna/Cinema film simulation mode, slow motion 1080p capture, and the ability to record full HD internally while outputting 4K over HDMI. Autofocus in movie mode is still a bit of a question mark, but rest assured we’ll be putting it to the test in short order.

Video interface and usability

In a further nod to the X-H1’s cinematic leanings, Fujifilm’s included specific shutter speed options in video mode that directly correspond to 90, 180 and 360 degree shutter angles on more dedicated video cameras. In other words, instead of being stuck with shutter speeds of 1/25 sec, 1/50 sec or 1/100 sec for shooting 24p video, you can choose 1/24 sec, 1/48 sec, 1/96 sec, and so on.

Touchscreen benefits aren’t limited to stills applications either – Fujifilm put a lot of thought into adding touch control for video shooters. Movie Silent Control disables the aperture ring, shutter speed dial and ISO dial, shifting those settings to touch control. This makes it easy to leave settings dialed in for stills, and then jump quickly to video shooting with separate settings. It’s a great feature to have if you’re, say, shooting stills and video at the same time at a wedding reception, but our initial impression is that the interface itself feels a bit fiddly.

It’s worth noting that the newly announced X-mount versions of Fujifilm’s MK cinema lenses will work beautifully on the X-H1, as you can see your aperture as T-stops rather than F-stops.

Unfortunately, despite all the strides Fujfilm’s made for video users, there’s a notable lack of exposure aids of any kind – you don’t even get zebra warnings, much less waveforms.

Who’s it for?

It’s not totally clear-cut who this camera is for. High-end stills shooters who want an X-T2 with stabilization may feel that their ship has finally arrived. But with so much emphasis on video features, is this a camera that’s better suited for photographers who need to shoot video along with their stills?

Fujifilm tells us it’s a camera for both parties. Like the Sony a6500, it acts as a step-up model even if you aren’t planning on shooting video (a step-up model that happens to be VERY capable in the video department). So if you’re a stills shooter who buys one, do us a favor and give the movie mode a try – it looks pretty darn good so far.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Fujifilm X-H1 sample gallery

15 Feb

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Fujifilm’s newest X-series camera takes video very seriously, but also offers a strong stills feature set largely borrowed from the X-T2. We’ve had some time with a full-production X-H1 that luckily coincided with a little bit of rare February sunshine. Take a look at a fresh batch of samples from Fuji’s newest flagship – including some images processed with the new Eterna/Cinema film simulation mode.

See our Fujifilm X-H1 sample gallery

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Fujifilm announces X-H1 stills/movie flagship with in-body stabilization

15 Feb

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Fujifilm has unveiled the X-H1, a flagship 24MP APS-C camera that builds on the X-T2’s feature set by adding 5-axis image stabilization, a touchscreen and more advanced video capabilities.

The X-H1 gains the ability DCI 4K capture at 23.97p and 24p, in addition to UHD recording at up to 29.9p. It can also record F-Log footage internally for the first time and adds a movie filmstock style ‘Eterna’ Film Simulation mode. More advanced compression allows video capture at up to 200 Mbps: double that of the X-T2.

Movie shooting is also aided by a predominantly touchscreen-operated ‘Movie Silent Shooting’ mode, which deactivates the camera’s dedicated control dials.

The X-H1 borrows styling cues from the medium-format GFX 50S, including a top-panel status LCD and sloping viewfinder prism. It shares the X-T2’s top burst rate of 14 fps with electronic shutter or 8 fps with mechanical shutter, boosted to 11 fps with optional grip.

Like the X-T2, adding a battery grip extends 4K video shooting from 15 minutes to 29 minutes, 59 seconds. It also adds a headphone socket.

Click here to read our Fujifilm X-H1 First Impressions Review

Press release

FUJIFILM UNVEILS THE NEW X-H1, THE HIGHEST PERFORMANCE CAMERA IN THE X SERIES LINEUP

Introducing in-body image stabilization, professional video capabilities, and a range of new features in a robust, durable camera body

Valhalla, N.Y., February 15, 2018 – As a leader in advanced digital camera technology and outstanding image quality, FUJIFILM North America Corporation is excited to announce the new FUJIFILM X-H1, featuring a 24.3 megapixel APS-C sized X-Trans CMOS III sensor and X-Processor Pro image processing engine for outstanding image quality. The new X-H1 is the highest performance camera in the X Series line of mirrorless cameras, and the first to feature in-body image stabilization (IBIS), a new Flicker Reduction mode that allows for stable exposure under fluorescent and mercury lighting, DCI 4K and other impressive video capabilities.

“The new X-H1 is our first X Series model to feature in-body image stabilization, and we are very excited to introduce this camera to the market,” said Yuji Igarashi, General Manager of the Electronic Imaging Division & Optical Devices Division at FUJIFILM North America Corporation. “In addition to ensuring outstanding image quality, the X-H1 is fully equipped with an array of features and functionality specifically designed to enhance creative expression in a wide range of settings.”

The X-H1 boasts a newly designed, robust and durable body, and a range of features that support shooting in various situations by professional and experienced amateur photographers, and videographers. When used in combination with FUJINON lenses and Fujifilm’s signature color reproduction technology, the X-H1 produces outstanding image quality and video reproduction.

New 5.5 Stops In-Body Image Stabilization
The new X-H1 is the first X Series camera to feature in-body image stabilization, harnessing three axial accelerometers, three axial Gyro sensors, and a specially-developed dual-processor to achieve approximately 10,000 calculations per second. When combined with compensating mechanisms, the X-H1 produces uncompromised image quality and precision. 5-axis image stabilization is possible with all XF and XC lenses, with certain lenses capable of up to a maximum of 5.5 stops. In addition, a new spring mechanism has been added to reduce micro-vibrations caused by operation of the mechanical shutter. Photographers may also choose to use the electronic front curtain shutter or the electronic shutter, virtually eliminating the effect of vibrations to maximize the benefits of image stabilization.

Robust, Weather-Resistant Body Design and Easy Operability for a Wide Range of Shooting Environments
In addition to its dust and water-resistant properties and ability to operate in temperatures as low as 14°F \ -10°C, the X-H1 also features 25% thicker magnesium alloy than the X-T2. The camera also features a high quality, scratch-resistant coating and a compact, lightweight body that maintains high precision and strong resistance to impact shock torsion and other sources of deformation.

The new X-H1 features a high-magnification and high-precision electronic viewfinder with a magnification ratio of 0.75 times and 3.69 million dot resolution, leading the class for APS-C mirrorless cameras. The viewfinder display is extraordinarily smooth, with a display time lag of just 0.005 seconds and a frame rate of 100 frames per second, allowing the user to instantly confirm the movement of the subject and position the focus with great precision. The X-H1 also features a 3-direction tilt, 3-inch, 1.04 million dot electrostatic touch-panel LCD, which can be intuitively set to the desired angle. In addition, the 1.28 inch sub-LCD on the top of the camera, which emulates the design of the mirrorless medium format GFX 50S, allows for instant confirmation of shooting information.

The X-H1 incorporates additional improvements based on feedback from professional photographers, including a large grip design, leaf-spring switch for the shutter-release button, near-silent shutter sound, a new focus level, and a new AF-ON button and enlargements of buttons on the rear of the camera.

Comprehensive Range of Video Features Support Movie Production
The X-H1 is the first camera in the X Series to include ETERNA, a new film simulation mode that is ideal for shooting movies. This mode simulates cinematic film, creating understated colors and rich shadow tones, greatly enhancing creative freedom during post-processing. The X-H1 boasts many functional and performance improvements to video image quality, including the 1080/120P high-speed video mode (1/2, 1/4 and 1/5 speed slow motion) for recording spectacular slow-motion footage; F-log SD card recording which aids smooth workflow; a DCI 4K shooting mode (4096×2160); a 400% dynamic range setting (approximately 12 stops); 200 Mbps high bit rate recording; a high-sound quality internal microphone (24 bit/48 kHz); and verbal time codes.

First Flicker Reduction Mode and Improved Autofocus Algorithms
The X-H1 features a flicker reduction mode, allowing for stable exposure during burst shots even under fluorescent and mercury lighting. In addition, improvements to the autofocus (AF) algorithm have achieved a number of performance enhancements. Low-light limit for phase detection AF has been improved by approximately 1.5 stops—from 0.5EV to -1.0EV—raising the precision and speed of AF in low-light environments. The minimum aperture has been expanded from F8 to F11, and major improvements have been made to the AF-C performance while operating in zoom, making the X-H1 ideal for shooting rapidly moving subjects.

Vertical Power Booster Grip VPB-XH1
The Vertical Power Booster Grip (VPB-XH1) is a weather-resistant grip capable of operating at temperatures as low as 14°F/-10°C that fits two additional batteries to increase maximum number of shots to 900 (in normal mode) and increases the maximum period for shooting movies in 4K to about 30 minutes.
The Vertical Power Booster Grip features a shutter release button, focus lever, AE-L button, AF-ON button, command dial, Q button, and Fn button, providing the same ease of operation when using the camera in vertical or horizontal positions. The grip is equipped with a headphone socket to allow monitoring sound while recording, and includes recharging capability.

Wide Eyecup EC-XH W
The Wide Eyecup EC-XH W covers a broad area around the eye, greatly reducing light interference to enhance concentration during long shoots. The eyecup can be rotated in 90° increments, making it adaptable for either eye and for shooting either vertically or horizontally.

FUJIFILM X-H1 Key Features:

  • 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III Sensor with primary color filter and X-Processor Pro Processor
  • 5-axis 5.5 stops in-body image stabilization
  • High-precision 0.5 inch, approx. 3.69 million dots OLED Color Viewfinder
  • Weather-resistant design; ability to operate in temperatures as low as 14°F/-10°C
  • ISO Sensitivity
    o Standard output: AUTO1 / AUTO2 / AUTO3 (up to ISO12800) / ISO200~12800 (1/3 step)
    o Extended output: ISO100/125/160/25600/51200
  • LCD Monitor
    o 3.0 inch, aspect ratio 3:2, approx. 1.04 million dots touch screen color LCD monitor(approx. 100% coverage)
  • Continuous Shootingo 14.0 fps (with the Electronic Shutter), 8.0 fps (with the Mechanical Shutter)o 11.0 fps (with the Mechanical Shutter and when fitted with VPB-XH1)
  • Movie Recording (using a card with the UHS Speed Class 3 or higher)
    o [4K (4096×2160)] 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 15min.
    o [4K (3840×2160)] 29.97P / 25P / 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 15min.
    o [Full HD (1920×1080)] 59.94P / 50P / 29.97P / 25P / 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 20min.
    o [HD (1280×720)] 59.94P / 50P / 29.97P / 25P / 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 30min.• Bluetooth® Ver. 4.0 low energy technology
  • New ETERNA film simulation mode
    o Simulates cinematic film, understated colors and rich shadow tones
  • New Flicker Reduction Mode
    o Provides stable exposure during burst shots even under fluorescent and mercury lighting
  • Advanced filters and Film Simulations, including ACROS
  • Accessories included:
    o Li-ion battery NP-W126S
    o Battery charger BC-W126
    o Shoe-mount flash unit EF-X8
    o Shoulder strap, Body cap, Strap clip, Protective cover, Clip attaching tool, Hot shoe cover, Vertical Power Booster Grip connector cover, Sync terminal cover, Cable protector, Owner’s manual

Availability and Pricing
The X-H1 will be available on March 1, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada. The X-H1 Body will be available for USD $ 1,899.95 and CAD $ 2,449.99 and the X-H1 Body with Vertical Power Booster Grip Kit will be available for USD $ 2,199.95 and CAD $ 2,799.99

Fujifilm X-H1 specifications

Price
MSRP $ 1899 (body only)
Body type
Body type SLR-style mirrorless
Body material Magnesium alloy
Sensor
Max resolution 6000 x 4000
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 24 megapixels
Sensor size APS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor type CMOS
Processor X-Processor Pro
Color space sRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter array X-Trans
Image
ISO Auto, 200-12800 (expands to 100-51200)
Boosted ISO (minimum) 100
Boosted ISO (maximum) 51200
White balance presets 7
Custom white balance Yes (3 slots)
Image stabilization Sensor-shift
CIPA image stabilization rating 5 stop(s)
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, normal
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
  • Raw (Fujifilm RAF, 14-bit)
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Manual focus Yes
Number of focus points 325
Lens mount Fujifilm X
Focal length multiplier 1.5×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,040,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic
Viewfinder coverage 100%
Viewfinder magnification 1.13× (0.75× 35mm equiv.)
Viewfinder resolution 3,690,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/8000 sec
Maximum shutter speed (electronic) 1/32000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
Built-in flash No (Small external flash included)
External flash Yes
Flash modes Auto, standard, slow sync, manual, commander
Flash X sync speed 1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • Panorama
  • Advanced
  • Single shot
  • Continuous L/M/H
  • Bracket
  • Video
Continuous drive 14.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±5 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing ±3 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)
WB Bracketing Yes
Videography features
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Modes
  • 4096 x 2160 @ 24p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 30p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 25p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 24p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 23.98p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p / 100 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 50p / 100 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p / 100 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 25p / 100 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 24p / 100 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 23.98p / 100 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types Dual SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II compatible)
Connectivity
USB USB 3.0 (5 GBit/sec)
USB charging Yes
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0
Remote control Yes (via smartphone or wired remote)
Physical
Environmentally sealed Yes
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description NP-W126S lithium-ion battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 310
Weight (inc. batteries) 673 g (1.48 lb / 23.74 oz)
Dimensions 140 x 97 x 86 mm (5.51 x 3.82 x 3.39)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes
GPS None

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Fujifilm X-H1 First Impressions Review

15 Feb

The Fujifilm X-H1 is the company’s range-topping APS-C camera and its most video-capable camera to date. It’s based around the same 24MP sensor as the X-T2 but adds in-body image stabilization as well as a more comprehensive set of video options.

The X-H1 looks like a fractionally larger X-T2 but with the sloped viewfinder ‘prism’ and top-panel LCD that hint at the styling of the GFX 50S. Fujifilm has also clearly been listening to critics of the X-T series and have made the camera’s grip and buttons significantly larger, particularly the AE-L and newly-added AF-On buttons.

Key specifications

  • 24MP X-Trans APS-C sensor
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilization (rated at 5EV)*
  • 3.69M-dot OLED viewfinder
  • Touch sensitive rear LCD with two-axis tilt
  • DCI and UHD 4K capture at up to 200 Mbps
  • Slow motion 1080 (from 120 and 100 fps)
  • Internal F-Log capture
  • 24-bit audio capture
  • Eterna/Cinema Film Simulation mode
  • Timecode
  • No-blackout continuous shooting
  • Twin UHS-II-compatible card slots
  • Anti-flicker shooting mode
  • Wi-Fi with Bluetooth for constant connection

The company says it’s made further improvements to its AF system and says the new camera will be able to focus in lower light and with smaller apertures.

Despite being based around the same sensor and processor, the X-H1 promises significantly improved video performance, with the range of shooting options extended to include DCI as well as UHD 4K shooting, bitrates up to 200 Mbps and the ability to record F-Log footage internally.

Other additions include the movie style ‘Eterna’ Film Simulation and an anti-flicker option for shooting under artificial lights.

Interestingly, although rated at 5EV, Fujifilm says the stabilization can hit 5.5EV of effectiveness if paired with non-IS lenses. The explanation for this is that the unstabilized lenses tend to be primes and are generally relatively wide focal lengths, both of which mean they’re more likely to project a larger image circle than the sensor requires. This gives the sensor more room to move around, providing greater stabilization.

Enhanced video

The X-T2 is already a very credible video performer: offering good levels of detail capture and Log output over HDMI if needed. The X-H1 takes this a step further. In addition to being able to shoot UHD 4K at up to 30p it can also shoot the wider aspect ratio DCI 4K format at 23.98 and 24p. Enhanced compression options allow capture at up to 200 Mbps and it can also capture F-Log footage internally.

Like the X-T2, the H1 uses a 1.17x crop region of its sensor to capture its UHD and DCI 4K video. This means using roughly 1.4x more pixels than necessary, in each dimension, to produce its UHD footage. This oversampling leads to higher levels of detail capture than would be possible by simply using a 3840 x 2160 region. If the X-T2 is anything to go by, it should look good and have pretty well-controlled rolling shutter.

It seems most of the camera’s additional size relates to the addition of the stabilization unit, since the X-H1 is still limited to 15 minutes of 4K shooting. However, as with the X-T2, there’s an optional battery grip that lets the camera cycle between drawing power from each of three batteries. Presumably this avoids too much heat building up in the same place, since it extends the camera’s 4K shooting duration out to the traditional 29 minutes, 59 seconds stipulated by import duty regulations.

On top of this comes the ability for the camera to retain a raft of settings separately for stills and video. This means you don’t have to significantly reconfigure the camera every time you switch from stills to video shooting or back.

Parameters treated independently for movie shooting
  • Film Simulation
  • Dynamic Range mode
  • White Balance
  • Highlight Tone
  • Shadow Tone
  • Color (saturation)
  • Sharpness (sharpening)
  • Noise reduction
  • Peripheral light correction (vignetting )
  • Focus area
  • Focus mode
  • AF-C Custom Settings
  • Pre-AF
  • Face/Eye Detection
  • MF Assist
  • Focus Check

The obvious things that can’t be set independently for stills and movie shooting are the exposure settings, since these are primarily defined by dedicated control dials. If you plan to swap back and forth between stills and video shooting, the camera’s new ‘Movie Silent Control’ mode is one way around this.

Movie Silent Control disables the aperture ring, shutter speed dial and ISO dial, passing control to a touchscreen, joystick and four-way controller-based interface. This means discrete stills and video settings can be maintained, since the dedicated control points no longer have any affect in video mode.

However you choose to control exposure in movie mode, you’ll quickly find that the X-H1 offers shutter speeds equivalent to 360, 180 and 90 degree shutter angles for 24, 30 and 60p video capture, with the options for 1/24th, 1/48th, 1/96th, 120th and 1/240th becoming available.

Like its sibling, the X-H1 offers a series of focus peaking options (color and intensity) but no zebra warnings for setting exposure, beyond the ‘Live View Highlight Warning’ option that indicates an unspecified and unspecifiable brightness.

The X-H1 also brings Fujifilm’s DR modes to movie capture for the first time, allowing you to capture more highlight information, if you can tolerate higher ISO settings. Meanwhile the ‘Eterna/Cinema’ Film simulation is designed to give ‘soft,’ low-saturation footage with low contrast but distinct shadows. Fujifilm says it can be used as an end-point in itself or to give yourself a degree of latitude for color grading.

Users of Fujifilm’s MK lenses (launched in X-mount alongside the X-H1) will appreciate the ability to view aperture as T-stops, rather than F-numbers. It’s unclear at this point whether this option will be available with adapted and third-party lenses identified this way.

Dynamic Range Priority

Fujifilm was one of the first brands to exploit the ISO-invariant properties of the sensors it uses through its Dynamic Range modes (The DR modes offer multiple ways of delivering ISO settings using different amounts of hardware amplification to capture additional highlight information).

The X-H1 takes this further with a ‘Dynamic Range Priority’ mode. This uses the existing DR modes in combination with the camera’s ability to adjust the Highlight and Shadow aspects of its tone curves. There are four settings: Weak, Strong, Auto and Off. The ‘Weak’ setting is DR200% mode with highlights and shadows softened by 1 step (since it’s baed on DR200%, is only available from ISO 400 upwards), while ‘Strong’ is DR400% with Highlights and Shadows set to -2. Strong is only available from ISO 800 or higher.

New shutter mechanism

Along with in-body stabilization, the X-H1 gains a new, quieter shutter mechanism. In addition to being quieter, it also allows the camera to offer Electronic First Curtain (EFC) shutter mode. In this mode the sensor being activated starts the exposure but a physical shutter is still used to end it, so that you avoid any risk of shutter shock but without any risk of rolling shutter.

Various combinations of EFC, mechanical and fully electronic shutter are available, to allow the use of each mode for the shutter speeds where it gives its greatest advantage.

Compared with its peers

The X-H1 is the latest high-end crop sensor camera to offer both stills and video shooting but each one provides a different set of features:

Fujifilm X-H1 Fujifilm X-T2 Sony a6500 Panasonic GH5
US MSRP
(body only)
$ 1900 $ 1600 $ 1400 $ 2000
Pixel count 24MP 24MP 24MP 20MP
Sensor size APS-C APS-C APS-C Four Thirds
Image Stablization 5-axis, 5.5EV Lens only 5-axis, 5EV 5-axis, 5EV
Maximum shooting rate 14 fps with e-shutter, 8 fps mechanical (11 with grip)

14 fps with e-shutter, 8 fps mechanical (11 with grip)

11 fps 9 fps (11 with S-AF)
AF Joystick? 8-way 8-way No 4-way
Touchscreen Yes No Yes Yes
Screen articulation Two-axis tilt Two-axis tilt Tilt Fully articulated
EVF 3.69M dots 2.36M dots 2.36M dots 3.69M dots
Viewfinder magnification 0.75x 0.77x 0.70x 0.76x
Video Bit depth 8 8 8 10
Max bitrate
(Mbps)
200 100 100 400 (150 in 8-bit mode
Mic / Headphone sockets? Yes / On VPB-XH1 accessory grip Yes / On VPB-XT2 accessory grip Yes / No Yes / Yes
Log capture? Yes HDMI out only Yes HLG (V-Log L Via paid upgrade)
HDMI Micro Micro Micro Full size
USB 3.0 Micro Type B 3.0 Micro Type B 2.0 Micro Type B 3.1 Type C
Shots per charge (CIPA rating) 310 340 310 410
Weight (with card and battery) 673g 507g 453g 725g

Pricing and availability

The X-H1 will be available from March 1st at an MSRP of $ 1899 body only and $ 2199 bundled with the VPB-XH1 vertical grip.


*Fujifilm says the camera will give up to 5.5EV of stabilization when paired with non-stabilized XF lenses.

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Fujifilm Imaging Solutions posts excellent financial results

14 Feb

Fujifilm Holdings has posted its financial results for the first three quarters of the 2017 fiscal year, and it’s all good news for the Imaging Solutions division. The segment recorded a revenue of 297.7 billion yen (approximately $ 2.77 billion USD), a bump of 15.6% year-on-year. Imaging Solution operating income totaled 50.0 billion yen (approximately $ 465 million USD), up 76.1% over the same period during the previous year.

From the figures in its earnings presentation, it seems the bulk of the increase comes from the Photo Imaging business—read: Instax cameras—but strong sales in the Electronic Imaging business show the X-Series is starting to deliver. Quarterly revenue for Electronic Imaging is up 39%, thanks to strong sales of the X-E3, X-T20 and X100F models, and the mirrorless medium-format camera GFX 50S and corresponding lenses.

Sales also increased in the Optical Devices business, largely due to strong sales of various industrial-use lenses, used for example in vehicle cameras or projectors. And, finally, Fujifilm’s presentation also mentions the launch of the new MK series of lenses, which are designed for cinema cameras and targeted at the growing area of video creation for online purposes.

If you want to dive into more detail, you can find all the report documents, including a video of the presentation, on the Fujifilm Holdings website. But long story short: Fujifilm’s Imaging Solutions division seems to be doing very well.

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Fujifilm X-A5 added to Best Cameras under $500 buying guide

03 Feb

We’ve added the Fujifilm X-A5 mirrorless camera to our ‘Best Cameras under $ 500’ buying guide. It’s too new to be eligible for an award, but that may change when we get our hands on one.

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Fujifilm introduces XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 lens, its first X-series power zoom

31 Jan

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Fujifilm has announced its first power zoom lens for X-series cameras: the XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ. This compact, stabilized lens is equivalent to 23-69mm on Fuji’s X-series cameras, such as the new X-A5 with which it will be kitted. It has a minimum focus distance of 5 cm, a length of 44mm (1.7″) when fully collapsed and a weight of just 136 g (4.8 oz).

The XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ comes in silver and black and will ship in early February for $ 299.

Press Release:

FUJIFILM ANNOUNCES THE NEW X-A5 – THE LIGHTEST CAMERA-ZOOM LENS COMBINATION IN THE X SERIES LINEUP

Featuring an enhanced sensor, newly developed zoom lens, the latest Bluetooth® technology, and 4K video recording, the X-A5 delivers outstanding image quality and ease of use

Valhalla, N.Y., January 31, 2018 FUJIFILM North America Corporation is excited to announce the new FUJIFILM X-A5 Digital Camera Body with XC15-45mm Lens Kit, the lightest camera-zoom lens combination within the X Series lineup. With a host of new and improved features, the X-A5 kit debuts the new FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ, the first electric powered zoom lens for X Mount digital cameras. Available in three colors of synthetic leather, the X-A5 is equipped with the latest Bluetooth® technology for quick and easy image transfer and allows for a broader range of video capabilities with its 4K output.

“The X-A5 packs Fujifilm’s renowned image quality and exciting fun features in a compact, lightweight body,” says Yuji Igarashi, General Manager of the Electronic Imaging Division & Optical Devices Division at FUJIFILM North America Corporation. “We are excited to bring a user-friendly camera that can capture great images, to the market at an affordable price.”

Featuring an Enhanced Sensor and Color Reproduction Technology

The X-A5 features a powerful 24.2MP APS-C sensor equipped with phase detection autofocus and a newly developed image processing engine with a processing speed 1.5 times faster than that of previous models. Combined with Fujifilm’s renowned color reproduction technology, the X-A5 achieves outstanding image quality and outperforms previous models in its scene recognition accuracy and skin tone reproduction, making it perfect for portraits.

The X-A5 is the first in the X-A series to feature phase detection pixels, and an intelligent Hybrid AF system that focuses twice as fast as previous models to ensure capture of swiftly moving subjects. With an ISO sensitivity range now up to ISO12800 and extended sensitivity range up to ISO51200, camera shake and noise are significantly reduced even in low-light conditions.

New Compact and Lightweight Electric Powered Zoom Lens

The new X-A5 introduces the first electric powered zoom lens for X Mount cameras, the FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ. With a minimum working distance of just 2 inches, this lightweight and compact lens is great for achieving clear close-up shots while making the photographic experience easy and comfortable. Capable of capturing crisp, intricate textures, the XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ is ideal for food and macro photography. Starting at a wide angle, this smooth electric-powered zoom also allows for great freedom in composition framing.

The new XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ lens will also be available for standalone purchase as a portable addition for existing X Series users.

Equipped with 4K Video Capabilities

The X-A5 features a variety of 4K video capabilities. Utilizing the Burst Function, users are able to shoot 15 frames per second in 4K image quality, ensuring that photo opportunities are never missed. Offering an HD video function to record videos up to quad speed for slow motion clips and a Multi Focus Mode which stacks 4K quality images and automatically changes the depth of field setting, the X-A5 is the perfect companion for a wide range of creative captures.

Bluetooth® Pairing Technology for Easy Image Transfer

Featuring the latest Bluetooth® technology, the X-A5 allows for automatic transfer of images and videos to paired smart devices using the free “FUJIFILM Camera Remote” app. The camera is compatible with Instax Share™ Printers to instantly transfer and print images directly from the camera.

Film Simulation Modes and Improved User Interface for Ease of Operation

The X-A5 allows for artistic expression through Fujifilm’s unique Film Simulation Modes that boast the company’s advances in color reproduction. Offering eleven different modes, users can add a creative twist to their images. In addition, the camera offers seventeen variations of Advanced Filters including the new “Fog Remove” and “HDR Art.”

An improved user interface allows for superior ease of use. The large LCD screen uses new touch-panel GUI, facilitating intuitive operation and is capable of rotating 180 degrees, making the X-A5 perfect for taking high quality self-portraits. When the panel is rotated 180 degrees, the Rear Command Dial switches to the Zoom and Shutter Release function and automatically activates the Eye AF function for sharp focus on the subject’s eyes. Additionally, the Portrait Enhancer Mode allows for users to select from three levels of skin tone enhancement with easy touchscreen operation.

FUJIFILM X-A5 Key Features:

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor and newly developed processor equipped with phase detection AF system
  • FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5- 5.6 OIS PZ wide angle electric-powered zoom lens with minimum working distance of 2”
  • 3” (approx. 1,040K-dot) high resolution LCD touchscreen using new touch-panel GUI can be tilted to 180°
    • Portrait Enhancement Level, Touch AF in Movie Mode, Advanced Filter Select
  • Standard output sensitivity of ISO200 – ISO12800
    • Extended output sensitivity: ISO100 – ISO51200
  • 4K video recording up to approx. 5 mins
    • Full HD 1920 x 1080 59.94p / 50p / 24p / 23.98p; continuous recording up to approx.14 mins
    • HD 1280 x 720 59.94p / 50p / 24p / 23.98p; continuous recording up to approx. 27 mins
    • High Speed Movie 1280×720 1.6x / 2x / 3.3x / 4x
  • Bluetooth® version 4.1 low energy technology
  • In-camera RAW processing
  • New Advanced Filters: “Fog Remove” and “HDR Art”
  • Wi-Fi® image transfer and remote camera operation
  • Improved battery life for still images – approx. 450 frames
  • Improved start-up period:
    • 0.4 sec., when High Performance mode set to ON
    • 0.8 sec., when High Performance mode set to OFF
  • Photos can be sent to instax SHARE printers using the free instax SHARE App (iOS and Android)
  • Accessories include:
    • Li-ion battery NP-W126S
    • AC power adapter
    • Plug adapter
    • USB cable
    • Shoulder strap
    • Body cap
    • Owner’s manual

Availability and Pricing

The new FUJIFILM X-A5 Camera Kit will be available on February 8, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD $ 599.95 and CAD $ 749.99.

The new standalone XC15-45mmF3.5- 5.6 OIS PZ Lens will be available on March 15, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD $ 299.95 and CAD $ 379.99.

Fujifilm XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ lens

Principal specifications
Lens type Zoom lens
Max Format size APS-C / DX
Focal length 15–45 mm
Image stabilization Yes
CIPA Image stabilization rating 3 stop(s)
Lens mount Fujifilm X
Aperture
Maximum aperture F3.5–5.6
Minimum aperture F22
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 7
Optics
Elements 10
Groups 9
Special elements / coatings 3 aspherical + 2 ED elements
Focus
Minimum focus 0.13 m (5.12)
Maximum magnification 0.24×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Stepper motor
Full time manual No
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter No
Physical
Weight 136 g (0.30 lb)
Diameter 63 mm (2.48)
Length 44 mm (1.73)
Sealing No
Colour Black, silver
Zoom method Rotary (extending)
Power zoom Yes
Zoom lock No
Filter thread 52 mm
Hood supplied No
Tripod collar No

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Fujifilm recalls nearly 300,000 camera power adapters due to ‘shock hazard’

25 Jan

Fujifilm has launched a massive power adapter recall that might affect a good number of readers. If you purchased a Fujifilm XP90, XP95, XP120, XP125, X-A3 or X-A10 camera from June 2016 onward, the wall plug that shipped with your unit might be at risk of cracking and/or breaking, “exposing live electrical contacts and posing a shock hazard” according to Fujifilm USA and the US Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC).

The specific power adapter that is at risk is the AC-5VF, and according to Fujifilm, it was shipped with some XP90 and XP95 cameras sold from June of 2016, XP120 and XP125 cameras sold from January 2017, X-A3 cameras sold from October 2016, and X-A10 cameras sold from February 2017.

According to the CPSC, Fujifilm is recalling about 270,000 of these power adapters in the US, and another 24,000 in Canada.

Photo of the affected wall plug. Image: Fujifilm

As with most recalls of this type, not all cameras were affected. To check if your serial number is affected, grab your XP90, XP95, XP120, XP125, X-A3 or X-A10 camera and find the serial number as shown in the picture below:

To see if your camera shipped with one of the affected wall plugs, here’s where you’ll find your camera’s serial number to plug into Fuji’s Search Tool.

Then take that serial number and plug it into Fujifilm USA’s search tool at this link, or reach out to Fujifilm directly via email at productsafety@fujifilm.com or by toll-free number 1-833-613-1200.

If your camera doesn’t come up in the search tool, you’re safe to keep using the wall plug that came with it. If it does come up, you’ll need to contact Fujifilm via the email or phone number above, at which point they will “arrange to mail you a free replacement wall plug and associated adapter unit.”

To learn more about this recall, or check your serial number against the database, visit the Fujifilm USA recall page.

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Fujifilm introduces budget-friendly and rugged FinePix XP130

24 Jan

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Fujifilm has introduced the FinePix XP130, its latest inexpensive rugged camera. The XP130 is largely the same as the XP120 that came before it, with the addition of Bluetooth, Eye AF and an electronic level being the major changes.

The XP130 has a 16MP BSI-CMOS sensor, 28-140mm equiv. F3.9-4.9 stabilized lens, 3″ LCD and 1080/60p video capture. Bluetooth makes pairing camera and smartphone easier and also allows for instant photo transfer. The XP130 has 96MB of built-in memory plus an SD card slot and a battery that will last for around 240 shots.

You’ll have five colors of XP130 to choose from: black, blue, green, yellow and white. It will ship in March for $ 229.95.

Press Release

FUJIFILM INTRODUCES NEW RUGGED FINEPIX XP130, THE PERFECT COMPANION FOR ANY ADVENTURE

Featuring the latest Bluetooth® technology, four rugged protection features and versatile shooting functions in a compact, lightweight body

Valhalla, N.Y., January 24, 2018 – FUJIFILM North America Corporation has announced the FinePix XP130, the newest addition to the rugged XP series. The XP130 is the first in the line to feature the latest Bluetooth® technology for easy to use, instant image transfer, and is also equipped with new shooting functions such as an Electronic Level and Eye Detection to provide even greater versatility. Equipped with a FUJINON lens and four rugged protection features in a lightweight body, the new XP130 is durable and delivers high quality images, making it the perfect companion for any kind of adventure.

Four-Way Rugged Protection for Worry-Free Use

The XP130 is waterproof up to 65 feet / 20 meters, shockproof up to 5.7 feet / 1.75 meters, freeze proof to 14°F / -10°C and dustproof, and features a protective, double-locking mechanism for the battery compartment. With a grip design for firm one-handed grip, the new XP130 is designed for ease of use and is tough enough for shooting in all situations.

Bluetooth® Pairing and Wireless LAN Connectivity for Photo Transfer and Instax Printing

Now featuring the latest Bluetooth® technology, the XP130 can instantly transfer images to a smartphone or tablet, while syncing time and location information from the camera to the images. Utilizing the free “FUJIFILM Camera Remote” app, users can take advantage of this new feature to quickly and easily share photos and videos with family or friends. Images can even be transferred from the XP130 directly to an Instax SHARE™ Printer.

Premium Image Quality Achieved with High-Performance Sensor and Lens

The new XP130 is equipped with a 16.4 megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor and FUJINON 5x optical zoom lens that includes a 28mm wide-angle setting and provides unique color reproduction technology and advanced sharpness to deliver outstanding image quality. With Intelligent Digital Zoom technology, the optical zoom range can be doubled to 10x, and, utilizing optical image stabilization, the XP130 minimizes the effects of camera shake even in low light conditions.

Compact and lightweight with a Large LCD monitor and Ease of Use Design

Compact and lightweight, the new XP130 features a large 3.0-inch 920K-dot high definition LCD monitor with anti-reflective, enabling users to comfortably check composition and pictures taken in bright daylight or underwater. The operation buttons on the XP130 are of optimal size and positioned to enable smooth operation and ease of use even while wearing gloves or holding the camera with one hand.

Versatile Shooting Functions for Enhanced Photography

The XP130 features a new Electronic Level feature that is particularly useful when capturing horizontal subjects such as beautiful landscapes, scenery or architecture. There is also a new Eye Detection feature that is designed to focus on the eyes of the subject, enabling the user to capture portraits with ease. Additional features include Cinemagraph mode that produces still images with moving elements, the Time-Lapse Video function that automatically converts images to video format utilizing the interval timer, the Burst Mode that captures up to 10 fps and smooth HD video recording of 60 fps.

FinePix XP130 Key Features:

  • 16.4MP back-illuminated CMOS sensor and FUJINON 5x optical zoom lens with 28mm wide-angle setting
    • Intelligent Digital Zoom function extends zoom range up to 10x
  • Four-way protection:
    • Waterproof up to 65 feet/20 meters, shockproof to 5.7 feet/1.75 meters, freeze proof to 14°F/ -10°C and dust proof
  • Compact lightweight design with 3.0 inch 920K dot high definition LCD monitor with anti-reflective coating
  • Bluetooth® Pairing and Wireless LAN connectivity, Smartphone Transfer and the FUJIFILM Camera Remote app
    • Transfer photos and videos from the XP130 to your smartphone or tablet, or directly to the Instax SHARE SP-2 or SP-3 Printer for quick, high-quality prints
  • Scene Recognition Mode quickly determines the scene before optimizing focus, exposure and shutter speed for best possible results
    • Underwater and underwater macro functions available
  • Electronic Level Feature: Can be used to capture a horizontal subjects
    • Eye Detection feature helps to capture portraits easily by automatically focusing on subject’s eyes
  • Remote Shooting function: Allows for wireless connection from the XP130 to a smartphone or tablet for remote camera operations such as releasing the shutter or zooming in and out
  • Interval Timer Shooting: Automatically shoots any number of images in set intervals
    • Interval can be set to either 5 or 10 minutes, or 15, 30 or 60 seconds
  • Burst Mode up to 10 fps, and Advanced Burst Mode capable of shooting at up to 60 fps
  • TimeLapse Video: Automatically converts images taken with interval timer to video
    • Frame rates of 10fps, 30fps or 60 fps can be selected along with three different types of movie size, including full HD. Allows for capturing transitions in nature from a stationary point, such as sunsets or opening flowers
  • Cinemagraph mode: Produces still images with moving elements
  • Motion Panorama 360° function for superb panoramic shots, and the Advanced Filter function to create advanced artistic effects with ease
    • Select from 11 filters when taking pictures or 7 filters during video recording
  • Records smooth Full HD video at 1080/60p with a dedicated movie button
  • Wind Filter Setting: reduces wind noise which is often a problem with outdoor movie recording

Availability and Pricing

The FinePix XP130 will be released in March 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD$ 229.95 and CAD $ 239.99.

Fujifilm FinePix XP130 specifications

Price
MSRP $ 229
Body type
Body type Ultracompact
Body material Metal, composite
Sensor
Max resolution 4608 x 3456
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 17 megapixels
Sensor size 1/2.3" (6.17 x 4.55 mm)
Sensor type BSI-CMOS
Color space sRGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
ISO Auto, 100-3200 (6400 available at lower resolutions)
Boosted ISO (maximum) 6400
White balance presets 7
Custom white balance No
Image stabilization Sensor-shift
Uncompressed format No
JPEG quality levels Fine, normal
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.) 28–140 mm
Optical zoom 5×
Maximum aperture F3.9–4.9
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Digital zoom Yes (2x)
Manual focus Yes
Normal focus range 60 cm (23.62)
Macro focus range 9 cm (3.54)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Fixed
Screen size 3
Screen dots 920,000
Touch screen No
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type None
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 4 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/2000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program AE
Scene modes
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Sport
  • Night
  • Night (Tripod)
  • Sunset
  • Snow
  • Beach
  • Under water
  • Under water (Macro)
  • Party
  • Flower
  • Text
Built-in flash Yes
Flash range 4.40 m (at Auto ISO)
External flash No
Flash modes Auto, Forced Flash, Suppressed Flash, Slow Synchro
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self-timer
  • Interval
Continuous drive 10.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs, group shot)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±2 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB Bracketing No
Videography features
Format H.264
Modes
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1280 x 720 @ 60p, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
Microphone Mono
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types Internal + SD/SDHC/SDXC card
Storage included 96MB
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
USB charging Yes
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port No
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0
Remote control Yes (via smartphone)
Physical
Environmentally sealed Yes
Durability Waterproof, Shockproof
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description NP-45S lithium-ion battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 240
Weight (inc. batteries) 207 g (0.46 lb / 7.30 oz)
Dimensions 110 x 71 x 28 mm (4.33 x 2.8 x 1.1)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes
GPS None

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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