RSS
 

Posts Tagged ‘Four’

A closer look at the Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN for Micro Four Thirds

12 Jan

We’ve got a pair of Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN lenses in the office: one for Micro Four Thirds and the other for Sony E-mount. In this article we have some impressions of the MFT version, as well as some other lenses in this class worth considering.

$ (document).ready(function() { SampleGalleryV2({“containerId”:”embeddedSampleGallery_9513055220″,”galleryId”:”9513055220″,”isEmbeddedWidget”:true,”selectedImageIndex”:0,”isMobile”:false}) });

The 16mm F1.4 acts as a 32mm equivalent lens on the Micro Four Thirds platform. It’s an interesting focal length to end up with: not quite 28mm equiv., which many people would consider the gateway to wide-angle, but also noticeably wider than the near-normal of 35mm equiv. I didn’t expect it to make any difference but found myself constantly fighting against too much stuff creeping into the edges of the frame in a way that I don’t with a 35mm.

In terms of handling, I felt the 16mm worked best when mounted on the larger Micro Four Thirds camera that feature prominent hand grips: its comparatively long length feeling a little unbalanced on the smaller, rangefinder-style boxes, though it’s light enough that it doesn’t end up feeling too front-heavy. The lens’s only control point is a large by-wire focusing ring. It’s a little under-damped for my tastes, rotating fairly freely but it was effective on the few occasions I ended up having to manual focus (turns out LED Christmas lights and autofocus do not always play nicely with one-another).

Optically, I was pretty impressed with the lens, the F1.4 (F2.8 35mm-equivalent) aperture gave me plenty of control over depth-of-field and sufficient light for low-light work. Sharpness seems good if not necessarily stellar and with what appears to be pretty good cross-frame consistency, until you reach the extreme corners. As you’d expect, the performance gets better if you stop down a couple of notches. The 16mm is pretty resistant to flare, even when given significant provocation, with good levels of contrast maintained even in contre jour images with veiling flare.

Autofocus was snappy to the degree that I didn’t ever really have to think about it. Only the aforementioned Hybrid AF/LED Christmas light mismatch caused me to even give it a second thought. It’s fast and quiet to the degree that you just don’t notice it, and can concentrate on composing your shot instead.

Alternatives

My impression is that the Sigma is sharper, two thirds of a stop faster and comparably priced to the Olympus 17mm F1.8. However, I don’t think it’s quite as easy a win as that makes it sound. The Olympus is significantly smaller and features the lovely snap-back manual focus clutch and linear manual focus system (faux-cus by wire, perhaps?), both of which are definite bonuses. So, while I’d find it hard to choose between the two, I probably wouldn’t rush out to replace a 17mm if I had one, not least because I personally prefer the narrower angle-of-view that the extra 1mm brings.

1mm in the opposite direction is the Panasonic 15mm F1.7. It usually retails for around $ 100 more than the Sigma, despite being rated as half a stop slower. Again it’s smaller than the Sigma, meaning it handles better on a smaller camera body. Similarly, the 15mm offers a neat operational advantage over the DN, at least for Panasonic shooters: the lovely Leica M lens style front aperture ring (worth the extra $ 100 on its own, in my opinion and well worth lobbying Olympus for firmware support for, if you’re on that side of the system). Optical performance is perhaps a step up from the Sigma, leaving the 16mm F1.4 DN DC as an attractive extra option for Micro Four Thirds but not an absolute must-have, from my perspective.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on A closer look at the Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN for Micro Four Thirds

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN for Micro Four Thirds sample gallery

07 Jan

$ (document).ready(function() { SampleGalleryV2({“containerId”:”embeddedSampleGallery_9513055220″,”galleryId”:”9513055220″,”isEmbeddedWidget”:true,”selectedImageIndex”:0,”isMobile”:false}) });

We’ve already taken the Sony E-mount version of Sigma’s super fast 16mm lens for a spin, and we were eager to see how the Micro Four Thirds version stacks up. Announced in fall of 2017, the 32mm equivalent prime includes weather-sealing a nine-blade aperture – all for $ 450.

See our Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN for
Micro Four Thirds sample gallery

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN for Micro Four Thirds sample gallery

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Tamron sets up ‘VIP Club’ for users with four or more registered lenses

28 Dec

Loyal Tamron users who own four or more lenses made by the third party lens maker might qualify to be a part of the company’s new VIP Club in 2018. Announced yesterday, the program creates three “membership” tiers that offer a variety of perks like free T-shirts, lens rebates, non-warranty repair discounts, an invitation to participate in a VIP-exclusive contest, and much more.

Anybody who has purchased and registered four or more Tamron lenses between May of 2011 and January 18th of 2018 is eligible for one of the tiers. Four lenses purchased and registered between those days will earn you a Silver membership, five earns you a Gold membership, and six or more earns you a Platinum membership.

You can read all about the perks available to the various tiers below, but remember: you must register your lens purchases to qualify. So if you’ve bought four more more lenses in the past 6 years but never registered them, you’ll want to get on that at the Tamron website.

Membership Perks

If you’ve purchased and registered four lenses between May 2011 and January 15th, 2018, you’re a Silver member, which entitles you to:

  • Welcome gift
  • Tamron magazine mailed three times per year
  • $ 50 bonus rebate towards any Tamron lens
  • 50% off of one Tamron event ticket (excludes summit)
  • 10% discount on non-warranty repair
  • Invitation to participate in VIP Member contest
  • Membership Card with lanyard

If you’ve purchased and registered five lenses between May 2011 and January 15th, 2018, you’re a Gold member, which entitles you to:

  • Welcome gift
  • Tamron t-shirt
  • Tamron magazine mailed three times per year
  • $ 75 bonus rebate towards any Tamron lens
  • 50% off of two Tamron event tickets (excludes summit)
  • Free pass to one Tamron event (excludes summit)
  • 15% discount on non-warranty repair
  • Invitation to participate in VIP Member contest
  • Membership Card with lanyard

And, finally, if you’ve purchased and registered six or more lenses between May 2011 and January 15th, 2018, you’re a Platinum member, which entitles you to:

  • Welcome gift
  • Tamron t-shirt
  • Tamron LL Bean vest
  • Tamron magazine mailed three times per year
  • $ 100 bonus rebate towards any Tamron lens
  • 50% off of three Tamron event tickets (excludes summit)
  • Free passes to two Tamron events (excludes summit)
  • 20% discount on non-warranty repair
  • Lifetime Limited Warranty on any new lens purchase from year of Club induction
  • Free shipping on repairs (Tamron USA will send a pre-paid shipping label to receive your lens)
  • Free 2-week lens loaners (if available, with signed loaner agreement)
  • Exclusive Tamron Photo Tips Hotline for questions about photo techniques and tips on how to use your lens and camera
  • Invitation to a Tamron Workshop Summit
  • Invitation for chance to be profiled on website
  • Invitation to participate in VIP Member contest
  • Membership Card with lanyard

For more details, check out the full press release below or head over to the Tamron VIP Club website by clicking here.

Press Release

Tamron USA Announces the Launch in 2018 of New VIP Club for Owners of Multiple Registered Tamron Lenses

December 26, 2017, Commack, New York – Tamron USA announced the development of a new VIP Club for registered owners of multiple Tamron lenses. To be launched in 2018, the VIP Club will include select users who have registered their Tamron lenses through the company’s online warranty registration system since May 2011 through January 15, 2018 (certain exclusions apply, see website for rules and details). There are three VIP Club levels: Silver for those having registered four purchased lenses; Gold for those having registered five purchased lenses; and Platinum for those having registered six or more purchased lenses. Club membership will be evaluated each year to include new members who qualify and to increase the level of existing members if applicable. The VIP Club will be in effect February 15, 2018 and 2018 members will be notified by email. Complete rules and details of the program are available at www.tamron-usa.com/vipclub.

2018 Silver Level Benefits (Four Registered Lenses)

Tamron owners who have purchased and registered four lenses during the time-frame of May 2011 and January 15, 2018 are eligible for these 2018 membership perks: Welcome gift; $ 50 bonus rebate each year of Silver status towards any Tamron lens; 50% off one Tamron event ticket each year of Silver status; 10% discount on non-warranty repairs; invitation to participate in the Tamron VIP Member contest; and three issues of the new Tamron magazine mailed to the member’s home.

2018 Gold Level Benefits (Five Registered Lenses)

Tamron owners who have purchased and registered five lenses during the time-frame are eligible for these 2018 membership perks: Welcome gift; T-shirt; $ 75 bonus rebate each year of Gold status towards any Tamron lens; 50% off two Tamron event tickets each year of Gold status; free pass to one event per year of Gold status; 15% discount on non-warranty repairs; invitation to participate in Tamron’s VIP Member contest; and three issues of the new Tamron magazine mailed to the member’s home.

2018 Platinum Level Benefits (Six or More Registered Lenses)

Tamron owners who have purchased and registered six or more lenses during the time-frame are eligible for these 2018 membership perks: Welcome gift; T-shirt; Tamron apparel; $ 100 bonus rebate each year of Platinum status towards any Tamron lens; 50% off three Tamron event tickets each year of Platinum status; two free passes to any Tamron event per year if available (excludes Summit); 20% discount on non-warranty repairs; lifetime limited warranty on any new Tamron lens purchased and registered within two years of Club induction at Platinum level; free shipping on any lens sent in for repair; exclusive Tamron Photo Tips Hotline; free 2-week lens loaners, if available; invitation to a 4-day workshop (The Workshop Summit, details below) if qualified; invitation to participate in the Tamron VIP Member contest; invitation for chance to be profiled on the Tamron website; and three issues of the new Tamron magazine mailed to the member’s home.

The Workshop Summit

Members of the Tamron VIP Club Platinum level whose latest lens purchase and lens registration was within the past two years as of January 15, 2018, will be invited to a 4-day/3-night Workshop Summit scheduled for Fall 2018. The Workshop Summit is limited to 25 participants, first-come/first-serve. Invitations will be sent to qualifying Platinum Level members in Spring 2018 by priority mail. The Workshop Summit includes three nights hotel, meals, transportation to/from hotel/airport in destination city, workshop transportation, workshop and loaner lenses. Airfare, home airport transportation, and other incidentals are not included. The Workshop Summit will be offered each year, and Platinum level members may participate in one Workshop Summit during the life of the program.

Tamron VIP Program Rules and Details

Complete rules and details are at www.tamron-usa.com/vipclub.

Registering Tamron Lenses

Tamron lens owners are encouraged to register their new purchase at www.tamron-usa.com (click link to go to registration page). Registration is quick and easy and owners enjoy these benefits: Instant serial number verification to ensure that a Tamron USA imported lens with 6-Year Limited USA Warranty and eligible for any qualifying rebate has been purchased; access to product information in the event of loss or theft; custom support if service is ever required; priority contact in the rare event we discover an issue with the registered product; and if subscribe is selected, invitations to local workshops, seminars and sales events, subscription to the Tamron e-newsletter and exclusive promotional offers. And now, registration has the benefit of becoming a Tamron VIP Club Member when membership level requirements are met.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Tamron sets up ‘VIP Club’ for users with four or more registered lenses

Posted in Uncategorized

 

iZugar launches 220-degree super fisheye lens for Micro Four Thirds

23 Sep

Hong Kong-based company iZugar has just launched a pretty quirky, intense little lens.Called the MKX22, it’s a 3.25mm F2.5 super fisheye lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras that offers a whopping 220-degree angle of view.

This fisheye lens is said to offer “edge-to-edge sharpness” with suitability for 4K video recording, a 0.6m minimum focusing distance, fully circular 10mm design, and extra-slim build for better parallax control, according to iZugar. All of that in addition to that 220-degree angle of view that can more-or-less see behind itself.

The lens recently appeared for sale on iZugar’s website, where the company explains that the MKX22 can be used with the ZCam E1 – iZugar Custom Edition, Blackmagic Micro Studio 4K, Sony A7R2, Panasonic GX80, and similar cameras. For reference, the company offers a full reference guide showing FOV for these cameras at various resolutions.

The lens is available from iZugar now for $ 500.

Lens Specifications:

  • Model: iZugar MKX-22
  • Format: 10mm full circular
  • Mount: Micro Four Thirds mount (MFT)
  • 35mm Equivalent Focal Length: 3.25mm
  • Aperture: f/2.5 (fixed)
  • Minimum Focusing Distance: 0.6m
  • Lens Groups/Elements: 10/11
  • Angle of View (MFT-4k): 220 x 150

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on iZugar launches 220-degree super fisheye lens for Micro Four Thirds

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Video: Four common composition mistakes and what to do instead

19 Sep

When you’re first starting out, the great big world of photography composition can seem like a long list of rules and a bunch of videos where photographers paste grids on top of iconic photos. It’s all a bit abstract. So if you’re looking for concrete advice, this video by photographer Evan Ranft is a much better place to start.

In the video, Evan discusses four common composition mistakes many photographers make, and then shows you how to fix them. Each tip is accompanied by a very useful “do this not that” before and after, and the advice is genuinely a lot more helpful than slapping a bunch of grids and golden ratio spirals on top of famous photos.

You can check out the video up top for a full rundown with before and after images, but the tips (in short) are:

  1. Double Subject – Don’t place your main subject side-by-side with an interesting background feature, it will split your viewer’s focus. Emphasize a single subject instead.
  2. The Look Out – If your subject is on one side of your photograph, have them look into, not out of, the frame. A subject looking out of the frame divides your photo in half, leaving a bunch of confusing negative space. If they’re looking into the frame, their gaze will balance out your composition.
  3. Tangent Lines – Avoid having anything in your background draw lines through your subject and scene. Use the lines of your photo to lead your viewer’s eye TO your subject instead.
  4. Being Lazy – Not the most obvious composition tip, but it counts: don’t be lazy. Once you’ve picked a subject, find an interesting composition. Don’t just take the easiest, most convenient photo in that moment

There you go: a few simple but effective tips that help create photos that emphasize your subject and lead your viewer where you want them to go. As Ranft says in the video, these are easy mistakes to correct, you just have to be aware you’re doing them.

To see more tips and how-tos from Evan, head over to his YouTube channel. And if you have your own simple composition tip (or common mistake) to share, drop it in the comments!

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Video: Four common composition mistakes and what to do instead

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Four Ways to Use Snapshots in Lightroom

27 Aug

What’s Lightroom’s most underrated feature? If you ask five different photographers you’ll probably get at least six answers. But for me, it’s Snapshots.

Lightroom snapshots

Unused and unloved – that was the fate of Snapshots in my Lightroom workflow for many years. It’s taken me a long time to appreciate how useful they are. For most of that time, I used Virtual Copies when I needed to create different versions of the same photo. But now I use Snapshots, and it’s made life a lot easier.

Why use Snapshots in Lightroom?

Let’s look at why you would use Snapshots or Virtual Copies.

One of the benefits of a Raw file is that you can interpret the file in many different ways in Lightroom. The most obvious example is that you could create both a color version of an image and a black and white one.

How to use Snapshots in Lightroom

Two versions of the same photo created in Lightroom from the same Raw file.

There are so many different ways of developing a photo in Lightroom that’s easy to make multiple versions of the same image. Sometimes it’s difficult to know when to stop! Especially if you have a large collection of Develop Presets.

Snapshots are the easiest way to keep track of all the different versions you make of a photo.

What is a Snapshot?

A Snapshot captures all the work you have done on a photo at a particular point in a time.

Snapshots are related to the entries in the History panel. You can turn any entry in the History panel into a Snapshot by right-clicking and choosing, Create Snapshot. Snapshots save you time because you don’t have to go searching through the History panel for the point you’d like to revert to.

Lightroom Snapshots

Some of the History panel entries for a photo I developed in Lightroom. It’s nearly impossible to pick the correct entry if you want you to go back to an earlier version of the photo.

How to create a Snapshot

There are two ways to create a Snapshot.

1. Go to Develop > New Snapshot (or use the Cmd-N [Mac] / Ctrl-N [PC] keyboard shortcut.)

Lightroom creates a Snapshot from the current Develop module settings. You can give it a name or use the default (current date and time).

Lightroom Snapshots

2. Right-click on an entry in the History panel and choose, Create Snapshot. Lightroom creates a Snapshot from the settings applied to the photo at that point in the development history.

Lightroom Snapshots

Reasons to use Snapshots

Now you know how to create a Snapshot, let’s look at some ways you can use them.

1. To record where you are in the Develop module

When you’re developing photos in Lightroom you may find yourself arriving a point where you are about to go off in a different direction. For example, let’s say you want to make both a color and a black and white version of the same image. You might start off by developing it in color. When you are finished, you make a Snapshot.

Then, you can convert it to black and white. When you’re done, make another Snapshot. You can then switch between the two versions by clicking on the appropriate Snapshot. See what that might look like below.

Lightroom Snapshots

2. To test out Develop Presets

Let’s say you would like to apply some Develop Presets to your photo, but you are not sure which ones are best. For example, I often develop my portraits using my Vintage Portrait Presets for Lightroom. There are 30 presets in the pack, and I don’t know in advance which ones will work best.

Using Snapshots, you can go through the entire set. When you find a preset that you like, you can create a Snapshot quickly using the keyboard shortcut Cmd-N [Mac] / Ctrl-N [PC].

At the end, you will have several Snapshots. You can then click on them one by one to see which preset you prefer. For example, I applied five different Vintage Portrait Presets to this portrait and saved each as a Snapshot. In the end, I decided the Vintage 19 preset was my favorite.

Lightroom Snapshots

Tip: Rename the Snapshot you decide is the one you like best to something like “Preset name [final]” so you can remember which one it is. You can also delete the other Snapshots by right-clicking and choosing, Delete.

3. To make comparisons

There’s an easy way to compare two Snapshots to see which version you like best.

Start by right-clicking on the first Snapshot and selecting Copy Snapshot Settings to Before. Then click on the second Snapshot to apply it to the photo you are developing. Use the backslash (\) keyboard shortcut to switch between the before and current settings to make the comparison.

You can also cycle between the Before/After views by clicking the icon marked below in the Toolbar (use the T keyboard shortcut to display the Toolbar if you can’t see it).

Using the Before/After comparison to compare two Snapshots.

4. To take the place of Virtual Copies

At the beginning of the article, I mentioned that I use Snapshots instead of Virtual Copies. The main reason is that Virtual Copies are difficult to keep track of.

For example, let’s say you create four Virtual Copies of a photo, each one developed a different way. To start with, they are probably all in the same Collection. As time goes by you may create more Virtual Copies of the same photo. This is quite common – many photographers change the way they develop photos as their style evolves and Adobe adds new tools to Lightroom.

A problem arises when those new Virtual Copies are in different Collections to the originals. Suddenly you have a situation where Virtual Copies are scattered across your Catalog. That makes it nearly impossible to see how many Virtual Copies of a photo you have created.

Snapshots solve that problem. With Snapshots, there is only ever one version of your photo in the Catalog. You never have to go hunting for missing Virtual Copies. All you need to do to see the different versions of your photo is click on the Snapshot name.

Lightroom Snapshots

This photo has 9 Snapshots. If they were Virtual Copies instead it would be much harder to keep track of them.

Tip: What happens if you make a Snapshot and then update the settings? The Snapshot doesn’t change as it’s intended to record the state of a photo at the point in time you made it. But it’s easy to update the Snapshot. Just right-click on the Snapshot’s name and choose, Update with Current Settings.

Conclusion

Hopefully, now you can see why Snapshots are both useful and under-appreciated. If you have a problem with too many Virtual Copies in your Catalog then try using Snapshots instead to see if they solve your problem.

And of course, if you have any questions about using Snapshots in Lightroom then please let me know in the comments below.


If you’d like to learn more about Lightroom, including great tips like the one in this article, then please check out my popular Mastering Lightroom ebooks. You’ll be making the most of Lightroom in no time.

The post Four Ways to Use Snapshots in Lightroom by Andrew S. Gibson appeared first on Digital Photography School.


Digital Photography School

 
Comments Off on Four Ways to Use Snapshots in Lightroom

Posted in Photography

 

Video: Four top-notch portrait photographers shoot the same model

18 Aug

There are two types of kind-of-clichéd photography challenges that are actually quite inspirational and informative: (1) A great photographer using a cheap camera, and (2) Several top-notch photographers shooting the same thing. This video by portrait shooter Jessica Kobeissi is a great example of the latter.

In the latest episode of her new series “4 photographers shoot the same model,” Kobeissi goes up against Joey L, Dani Diamond and Brandon Woelfel to see who can capture the most consistently great portraits of the same model—in this case, Charlotte McKee.

All four photographers get to pick one location and outfit, and the entire group has to shoot each of the scenarios. In practical terms, that means only one of the outfits and locations will be ‘familiar’ and ‘comfortable’ for each photographer. Oh, and you only get three minutes to shoot…

To see the final shots from each of the four photographer, check out the video up top. And then scroll down to reveal who shot each photograph:

Outfit 1
J.1 – Brandon
J.2 – Dani
J.3 – Jessica
J.4 – Joey

Outfit 2
D.1 – Jessica
D.2 – Brandon
D.3 – Joey
D.4 – Dani

Outfit 3
JL.1 – Dani
JL.2 – Joey
JL.3 – Brandon
JL.4 – Jessica

Outfit 4
B.1 – Jessica
B.2 – Joey
B.3 – Brandon
B.4 – Dani

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Video: Four top-notch portrait photographers shoot the same model

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Venus Optics Laowa C-Dreamer 7.5mm F2 for Micro Four Thirds sample gallery

06 Aug

$ (document).ready(function() { SampleGalleryV2({“containerId”:”embeddedSampleGallery_2901085478″,”galleryId”:”2901085478″,”isEmbeddedWidget”:true,”standalone”:false,”selectedImageIndex”:0,”startInCommentsView”:false,”isMobile”:false}) });

Laowa is one of the brand names used by Chinese manufacturer Venus Optics. We previously encountered Laowa when we produced a sample gallery of the full-frame Zero-D 12mm F2.8 – a lens that claims zero distortion and has exceptionally well corrected barrelling for any focal length let alone one with such a dramatic angle of view. This 7.5mm F2 lens is designed for Micro Four Thirds cameras and makes no such distortion claims, but is one of the widest focal lengths for the system and certainly stands out for its combination of wide angle and wide maximum aperture.

The lens is small but weighty, its solidity lending it a feel of a product well made. It is actually very nice to use, focuses smoothly and its 46mm thread means filters can be used – with care. It is manual focus, with the infinity setting at the left of the scale as you look down from the shooting position. The aperture ring doesn’t unclick and offers the smallest space between the penultimate F16 and ultimate F22 settings. It has a depth of field scale marked on the barrel along with distances, but I’m unconvinced that either is especially useful.

These sample images have been made using the lens on the Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5.

See our Venus Laowa 7.5mm F2
sample gallery

$ (document).ready(function() { SampleGalleryStripV2({“galleryId”:”2901085478″}) })

Sample photoSample photoSample photoSample photoSample photo

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Venus Optics Laowa C-Dreamer 7.5mm F2 for Micro Four Thirds sample gallery

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Four Common Myths About Full-Frame Cameras Dispelled

21 Jun

One of the beautiful things about modern digital photography is the astronomical degree of choice that is available to us. No matter whether you’re a professional photographer, a weekend warrior, or a casual enthusiast who just likes to take snapshots of your kids, your food, or your feet – there are dozens, even hundreds, of camera models and options to suit your needs. There are specialty cameras for recording extreme sports, underwater cameras for photographing the deep blue sea, and a slew of lenses available for DSLR and mirrorless cameras to suit any situation in which you might find yourself.

There are also some clear differentiating factors between these various options that make some cameras better suited to certain situations. One of the most common issues I see discussed is that of full-frame versus crop-sensor cameras. To help clear the air regarding this particular question I’d like to address four common myths about full-frame, with the goal of helping you choose a camera that suits your needs.

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a 10-year-old crop-sensor Nikon D200 and 50mm f/1.8 lens.

Myth #1: full-frame is better than crop-sensor

I see this myth being perpetuated all the time, particularly in online forums but also when talking to people in person. It’s a shame because it’s just not true. full-frame is certainly better in some aspects compared to crop-sensor cameras, but to declare that they are universally better is colossally misleading.

One analogy I like to use here is that of vehicles, particularly pickup trucks. A beast like the Ford F-150 is a fantastic and phenomenally well-rounded truck that excels at hauling, towing, and all the usual heavy-duty jobs for which one would typically buy such a vehicle. By comparison, the Toyota Tacoma is a smaller truck and not quite as powerful or capable, but actually beats its larger counterpart in some regards such as better gas mileage, smaller turning radius, and greater overall agility in a more urban environment.

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a full-frame Nikon D750 and 85mm f/1.8 lens. A crop-sensor camera would have worked, but would have required me to be farther back in order to get this same composition and there was simply not enough space in the room to do so.

Different not necessarily better

Neither truck is objectively better; both are well suited to the specific needs of the people who purchase them. The same is true for cameras in that full-frame cameras work very well in many regards. But to say they are better negates some of the unique advantages of smaller crop-sensor cameras.

full-frame models, as a rule, have strengths like greater high ISO capabilities, improved dynamic range, and improved build quality. If these things are important to you, then a full-frame camera might suit your needs. However, smaller and less expensive crop-sensor cameras have some unique advantages as well such as:

  • Autofocus points that reach farther out to the edges of the viewfinder.
  • Faster shutter sync speeds.
  • Longer reach—a 200mm lens on a crop-sensor camera is basically like shooting with a 300mm lens on a full-frame camera.
  • Generally less expensive.

These are all generalizations, of course, and there are always exceptions to the rule. But suffice it to say that just because full-frame cameras exist doesn’t mean you need to get one.

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a crop-sensor Nikon D7100, 50mm lens, and +10 close-up filter.

Myth #2: Shooting full-frame will improve your photography

This is a myth that’s closely related to GAS, or Gear Acquisition Syndrome – a condition that plagues many photographers and often causes them to continually buy more cameras, lenses, and accessories in the hopes that these things will help improve their photography. Getting a full-frame camera will certainly allow you to take advantage of the unique benefits that they offer, but it will by no means do anything to actually improve the quality of your photographs.

No matter what camera you have, whether it’s a mobile phone, pocket camera, or crop-sensor DSLR, the best thing you can do to make yourself a better photographer is to learn more about photography, not spend money on new gear. In fact, sticking with the gear you have and learning to work within its limitations can have a profound impact on your photography and go quite a long way towards helping you improve.

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a full-frame Nikon D750 and 50mm lens, but it was years of learning about composition, lighting, and other photographic principles that helped me get this shot.

To extend the vehicle metaphor just a bit, buying a Formula 1 car will not automatically make you a better driver. Certainly, it will allow you to have access to the unique capabilities of such a fine automobile. But simply parking an F1 racecar in your driveway will in no way upgrade your own ability to operate a motor vehicle. Some photographers mistakenly think that purchasing a full-frame camera will give their photography a boost. But in truth, it’s the day-in-day-out work of practicing the fundamentals of photography like composition, lighting, color, contrast, etc., that will lead to improvements.

Myth #3 Full-frame is too expensive for casual photographers

If you do decide that you want to invest in full-frame gear, you can take solace in the fact that price is no longer the barrier to entry that it once was. The first full-frame camera was the Canon 5D, which came out in August 2005 and cost about $ 3500 USD, which made it prohibitively expensive for all but the most dedicated professionals and ardent enthusiasts. Crop-sensor cameras were far cheaper, making them the default solution for many photographers around the world. To this day they remain a perfectly viable option for almost any type of photography.

However, as prices have gone down over the years it is now much more feasible to purchase full-frame gear compared to days gone by. New full-frame cameras such as the Nikon D610 or Canon 6D are about $ 1400-1500 (at the time of writing this) and can often be found on sale, which is a steal compared to just a few years ago. And while more expensive models such as the Canon 1DX Mark II or Nikon D5 can easily cost as much as a used car, you certainly don’t need those high-end models to take advantage of many of the benefits of shooting full-frame.

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a full-frame Nikon D750 and 70-200 f/2.8 lens. I could have taken a similar shot with a crop-sensor camera and different lens, but I specifically wanted the wide aperture of this lens and the control over depth of field offered by the D750.

Another benefit of the passing of time is that full-frame cameras which were cutting-edge a few years ago are significantly cheaper in price now that they have been replaced by newer models. Consider the Canon 5D Mark II, a camera which is so good it was used to film the season finale of the TV show House in 2010. While it can’t match the blistering high ISO performance and other tricks of its newer counterpart, it’s still a phenomenal camera and can be found used online for much cheaper than the shiny new models.

Myth #4 All serious photographers will eventually go full-frame

Friends and family members often ask me for advice when it comes to buying cameras and camera gear, and this used to be somewhat precarious territory due to the understanding that real photographers always ended up buying full-frame cameras. Thus, advising someone to buy a crop-sensor camera was to tread on dangerous ground because in a few years that person might realize his or her gear is a second-class citizen in the world of photography and it would have been better had a full-frame model been purchased from the start. Thankfully nowadays, as Princess Leia said to Han Solo at the end of Return of the Jedi, “It’s not like that at all.”

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a crop-sensor Nikon D7100 and 50mm f/1.8 lens.

Sensor technology in cameras today is so good that you can shoot professional photos whether you have full-frame, crop-sensor, medium format, micro-four-thirds, or in some cases even just a mobile phone. Camera gear is not the limiting factor it once was. So while many professionals certainly like to shoot full-frame, there is a growing number who prefer the features, size, convenience, and price of smaller models especially in the world of mirrorless cameras like the Olympus OM-D EM1 Mark II or Panasonic GH5.

If you have specific needs that are not being met by your crop-sensor camera then it may be a good idea to consider a full-frame camera. But otherwise, the gear you have is probably good enough and you’d be better off investing your money in lenses, lighting, and education rather than a new camera body.

Four Common Myths About full-frame Cameras Addressed

Taken with a full-frame Nikon D750 and 50mm f/1.8 lens. Why that particular setup? Honestly, I just like how that camera feels in my hands and I enjoy using it.

Conclusion

I’d like to hear from you, the DPS community, on this one. What type of camera gear do you shoot with, and is there any way in which you find it to be limiting? Do you shoot with full-frame and if so, what do you like about it? Are you content using crop-sensor cameras?

For the record, I personally use both crop-sensor and full-frame cameras and have specific purposes for both. But it’s always interesting to hear from other photographers on subjects like this. Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

The post Four Common Myths About Full-Frame Cameras Dispelled by Simon Ringsmuth appeared first on Digital Photography School.


Digital Photography School

 
Comments Off on Four Common Myths About Full-Frame Cameras Dispelled

Posted in Photography

 

Sigma offers firmware updates for four Canon mount lenses

19 May

Sigma has released new firmware for Canon mount versions of four of its lenses:

  • 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM | Contemporary Canon
  • 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM | Contemporary Canon
  • 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary Canon
  • 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art Canon

According to Sigma, the new firmware improves the AF accuracy of the lenses when used with the Sigma Mount Converter MC-11, as well as decreasing the lens diaphragm blades noise when using the aforementioned converter.

The same AF accuracy improvement and decreased noise also apply to the lenses when they are used with Canon EOS DSLRs while shooting video or while in Live Mode. Finally, Sigma says these lenses are now compatible with the Canon Digital Cinema Camera EOS C300 Mark II. 

Sigma lens owners with the Sigma USB Dock must first update the Sigma Optimization Pro software to, at minimum, version 1.4.1 (Windows) or version 1.4.0 (Mac) before installing the new firmware.

The full Sigma changelog is below:

Benefits of this firmware update

  • It has improved the AF accuracy when the lens is attached with the SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11.
  • ?It is necessary to use the SIGMA USB DOCK for Canon ver.1.02 or later to update the firmware.
  • ? For customers who own SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 EF-E, it is necessary to update this to the latest firmware ver. 1.05.
  • It has reduced the operating sound of the lens diaphragm blades when attached with the SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 EF-E and used for video shooting.
  • It has improved the AF accuracy when the lens is used for video shooting as well as with Live View mode of EOS DIGITAL SLR cameras.*1
  • It has reduced the operating sound of the lens diaphragm blades when the lens is used for video shooting on EOS DIGITAL SLR cameras. *1
  • It has become compatible with the Canon Digital Cinema Camera EOS C300 Mark II.
  • *1 The degree of improvement may differ depending on the camera used.

Via: Sigma

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Sigma offers firmware updates for four Canon mount lenses

Posted in Uncategorized