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Posts Tagged ‘f/2.8’

Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM sample gallery

17 May

The photographic ‘holy-trinity’ is an oft-described concept for the professional wedding, event and sports photographer. You have three cameras dangling from three straps around your body (and hopefully a chiropractor to help you with the aftereffects). These include cameras strapped to a 16-35mm (ish) F2.8 lens, a 24-70mm F2.8 and a 70-200mm F2.8 to make sure you don’t miss a thing.

With the new a9, Sony is aiming at the high-end sports photographer market, so their new FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM is a natural next step to appeal to the wide-angle enthusiasts within that crowd. See how it stacks up in our preliminary samples gallery.

See our Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM gallery

All images are processed through Adobe Camera Raw using a near-final build of that software where applicable for the new Sony a9 camera. Sharpness and noise reduction settings are left to default, the Adobe Standard color profile was used, and minor adjustments were made to white balance, highlights, shadows, whites and blacks. Due to bandwidth constraints, only JPEG images processed using the above settings are available at this time. Raw images will be coming shortly.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Lensrentals: Tamron 70-200 F2.8 G2’s resolution is excellent

08 Apr

Roger Cicala over at LensRentals has put Tamron’s new SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 lens to the test. 

Cicala notes that on its own, the Tamron is impressively sharp all the way to the edges at its wide end, and even better in the middle of its focal range. Sharpness drops a bit at full telephoto, but Cicala still says the 70-200 ‘puts in a very good performance.’

The Tamron SP 70-200 F2.8 G2 impresses at its wide end of 70mm.

The Tamron’s performance is comparable to Canon’s 70-200 F2.8L II, though a bit softer at the wide end. When put up against what Cicala calls ‘the best 70-200 zoom on the planet’ – the Nikon F2.8 FL ED VR – the Tamron struggles to keep up, though the gap narrows at 200mm.

Sample variation from ten Tamron SP 70-200 G2 lenses at 70mm.

In addition to lots of MTF charts, Cicala provides some helpful information about copy variation using ten of the new Tamron 70-200mms.

Read the full story on the
LensRentals blog

See our Tamron 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 sample gallery

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Canon introduces EF-S 35mm F2.8 macro lens with built-in ring light

06 Apr

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Canon has introduced a compact 35mm F2.8 IS STM macro lens for crop-sensor DSLRs. Similar to the EF-M 28mm F3.5 Macro lens introduced a year ago, the 35mm F2.8 has a built-in LED ring light. 

The lens, which is equivalent to 56mm when mounted on crop body, has a minimum focus distance of just 3 cm (1.2 in.). It uses Canon’s ‘Hybrid’ IS system, with up to four stops of shake reduction. Canon says that the lead-screw-type STM motor allows for quiet AF operation, which is ideal for video capture. The lens has seven rounded aperture blades as well as a glass-molded aspherical element.

The EF-S 35mm F2.8 IS STM lens will ship this June with an MSRP of $ 349.

Press Release

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL: CANON ANNOUNCES NEW EF-S 35MM F/2.8 MACRO IS STM LENS TO HELP EXPLORE THE BEAUTY OF MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY

New Compact and Lightweight EF-S Macro Lens Opens Up a World of Photographic Possibilities and Helps Capture Close Subjects with Incredible Detail

MELVILLE, N.Y., April 6, 2017 – Compact and lightweight, the new Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM, announced today by Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is the widest-angle Macro offering in Canon’s popular EF-S lens series. The new lens is designed to help both entry-level and advanced amateur DSLR photographers discover the incredible possibilities of macro photography. Capable of capturing close-up subjects with incredible detail, Canon’s new EF-S macro lens is also the first in the series to feature built-in Macro Lites that allow users to control lighting with ease.

“Macro lenses are an amazing way to explore the worlds that exist all around us, and the new Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM lens is the ideal starting point for amateur photographers eager to capture incredible, up-close details on the go,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “Whether capturing a delectable dessert or the subtleties of a backyard flower, users will be challenged to find new colors and shapes that turn everyday moments into art.”

The new Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM captures stunning images and is a terrific companion lens for entry-level users eager to expand beyond their existing Canon EOS DSLR kit lens. Capable of shooting as close as 30mm from the end of the lens to the subject, aspiring photographers can get up close to a fruit or flower for an entirely new perspective, while capturing high-quality images with beautiful background blur. Additional technologies built into the new Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM lens include:

  • Popular 35mm focal length (56mm equivalent) and wide f/2.8 aperture
  • Hybrid IS system offers up to four stops* of shake correction
  • Smooth Movie Servo AF with Lead Screw-type STM ensures quiet AF operation
  • Full-time Manual Focus

In a first for the EF-S lens series, the new Canon EF-S 35mm lens sports built-in Macro Lites that allow photographers to carefully arrange macro lighting without using special equipment. With built-in LED lights on each side of the lens, users can create compelling shadows on either side of a subject or adjust intensity to give images a sense of dimension. Once the scene is set, the lens uses superb rendering performance to capture high contrast, sharp images.

While specialized for high magnification photography, the Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM is still a versatile option for day-to-day use, easily capable of capturing portraits, landscapes or snapshots. As the latest addition to the lineup of EF-S lenses, Canon continues its commitment to providing a wide-range of affordable lens options for photographers of all levels.

The Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM lens is scheduled to be available in June 2017 for an estimated retail price of $ 349.99.

Canon EF-S 35mm F2.8 Macro IS STM specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size APS-C / DX
Focal length 35 mm
Image stabilization Yes (4 stops)
Lens mount Canon EF-S
Aperture
Maximum aperture F2.8
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 7
Optics
Elements 10
Groups 6
Special elements / coatings Glass-molded aspheric element
Focus
Minimum focus 0.03 m (1.18)
Maximum magnification 1×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Stepper motor
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter No
Physical
Weight 190 g (0.42 lb)
Diameter 69 mm (2.72)
Length 56 mm (2.2)
Sealing No
Colour Black
Filter thread 49.0 mm
Hood supplied Yes
Tripod collar No

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Zeiss formally announces Batis 135mm F2.8

06 Apr

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Zeiss has announced a new medium telephoto full-frame Batis lens for Sony E mount: the Batis 2.8/135. The Apo Sonnar optical design comprises of 14 elements in 11 groups inside a smooth metal body with an OLED display with distance and depth of field information. As with all lenses in the Batis line, it offers AF, and a robust build with weather-sealing. It also features image stabilization, like the Batis 85mm.

The lens will be available in May 2017 with an MSRP of $ 1,999.

Press Release:

The new ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 is the first 135 mm AF focal length for mirrorless full-frame cameras from Sony

OBERKOCHEN/Germany, 05/04/2017.

Fans of Sony’s mirrorless full-frame cameras have a reason to smile: ZEISS has added a further tele lens focal length to its ZEISS Batis lens family. The new ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 is the first 135 mm AF focal length for Sony’s Alpha 7 system with E-mount. Like all lenses from the ZEISS Batis range, this new addition is equipped with fast and precise autofocus. To avoid shaking, which can occur very easily with tele lenses, an optical image stabilizer has also been incorporated into the design. The ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 proves it worth particularly in portrait photography: “The tele focal length means the subject can stand out nicely against the blurred background”, says Product Manager Michael Pollmann from ZEISS. “The bokeh works very well indeed, and the optical design – an Apo Sonnar – ensures outstanding images time and again.” The new ZEISS Batis could also be a great option for event and wedding photography.

“Compact, lightweight, top quality”

“The advantage of Sony’s mirrorless full-frame system is that despite its compact size, it delivers exceptional image quality,” says Pollmann. ZEISS has continued to bring the design of the ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 into line with the needs of Sony photographers. “It was important to build a comparably handy lens – in spite of the rather long focal length. We made a conscious decision to strike a balance between compactness, weight and light intensity.”

OLED display visualizes depth of focus

Like all ZEISS Batis lenses, this latest addition features an OLED display that enables precise visualization of the depth of field. So you can be sure that the image is in focus in all the right places. The metal housing gives the lens its robust and durable character. ZEISS assures us that its dust and dirt shield means photo shoots in poor weather are a walk in the park.

The image quality leaves nothing to be desired: “We have put a lot of effort into the optical design and into correcting our lenses,” says Pollmann. “For example, we are experimenting with special types of glass in order to rule out as many kinds of image errors as possible. We have thus been able to ensure corrected chromatic aberration in the ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 so that we have virtually no image errors.” 14 lenses have been built into 11 groups in the camera lens.

Price and availability

The ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 will be available from specialist dealers starting May 2017 and will retail at 1,999 euros incl. 19 percent sales tax (RRP).

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 sample gallery

20 Mar

Like its predecessor, the Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 G2 offers moisture-resistance, and we couldn’t be more grateful. We put the updated telezoom to work in one of the rainiest months in recent Seattle history. With improvements to autofocus as well as image stabilization, it’s a substantial upgrade and, thankfully, a lens that’s not afraid of a few showers.

See our Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 sample gallery

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Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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dPS Writer’s Favorite Lenses: I’m Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

09 Mar
My Favourite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

I use my 50mm lens almost exclusively when I’m shooting abstract images.

I won’t lie to you, I’m genuinely torn here. There are two lenses that I could probably say were my favorites. One of those lenses became my favorite out of necessity. It was the only one I owned when I first started shooting with a DSLR. The other became favorite because of its versatility and something much more personal than professional.

My Favourite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

This image was shot with my 50mm lens. It was one of my first attempts at fine art photography. It’s so sharp.

My Favourite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

The large aperture of the 50mm allowed me to shoot during low-light situations.

It all started with the 50mm lens

Let’s head back in history to 2006 when I bought my first DSLR. I found a used Canon Rebel for sale online for $ 200. It came with a 50mm prime lens. That was fantastic; it was in my budget. I didn’t have a lot of money at the time as I was raising three kids under the age of six. I struck a deal with the seller, and I was in business.

When I went to my first camera course, the instructor laughed when he saw my gear. I thought, at first he was making fun of my gear. But, I was wrong, he was excited for me. He said having just the one lens would push me to be creative and to learn and find out how to take great photos. I would have no choice but to think about my composition because of the limitations of my gear. He said he wished all of his students were as limited as I was and that relying on gadgets and a zoom lens stunted creativity. They could essentially cheat instead of learning to see the photograph and position themselves correctly. He inspired me to push myself to learn everything I could about 50mm.

My Favourite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

The 50mm lens is ideal for portraits. It’s lightweight and easy for me to move around with.

I shot landscapes, portraits, macros, and everything in between. I love my 50mm lens because it’s light-weight and affordable. But, I love my nifty 50 because my photos are tack sharp. The bokeh with it is beautiful too, and I love experimenting with the larger aperture. The lens offers photographers so many creative possibilities. Seriously, what lens could be better?

My Favourite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

This is one of the rare times that I was able to use my 50mm with my family.

My second love – the 70-200mm f/2.8

I love the bokeh in this shot. The 70-200mm f/2.8 is awesome for this feature.

Well, it’s time for my second love to make an entrance. I love my 70-200mm f/2.8. This lens was also my first big glass purchase. I scrimped and saved for months to be able to buy it. At the time it seemed like an immense sacrifice, but it was worth it.

The lens is very versatile. I can use it for portraits, indoor sports, macro shooting, and candid images on the street. Really, I can use it for anything. It’s not overly heavy so I can hand hold it for extended periods of time, which is very nice. The large aperture is helpful for low light situations or when I need a fast shutter speed. It’s tack sharp, and the bokeh is beautiful. I take it everywhere. My 70-200mm has been on canoe trips and suffered rainstorms (albeit covered with a large garbage bag). It is my workhorse.

dPS Writer's Favorite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

The focal length of the 70-200mm is perfect for so many types of shots including street shooting or silhouettes at the beach.

All the reasons I listed, however, are not why this lens is my favorite. There is one thing about this lens that makes it unique. This one thing is more personal than it is professional. Those of you who have children will totally connect with me on this element. The longer focal length of this lens means that I can capture authentic images of my family.

My kids are very much sick of their mother taking their photos. They’ve been there and done that far too much. I can never get them to cooperate when I use my 50mm. Instead, my 70-200mm allows me to capture them from a distance. I can be discreet and not invade their fun. I can catch them laughing and acting naturally. Some of my most cherished shots have come from moments like this.

I’m sure my family knows I have my camera out and pointed at them, but because I’m not right in their faces they forget about me. Or at the very least they can ignore me. It’s the one thing I can’t do with my 50mm, and for this reason, the 70-200mm wins a special place in my heart.

dPS Writer's Favorite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

I like shooting landscapes with the 70mm range on this lens.

There are emotional ties to this lens

dPS Writer's Favorite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

He was just having fun. He wasn’t aware of my presence with my camera. Yes, his face is a little soft, but this shot is emotional and personal, not professional.

Forget all the features and the specs. I’m not overly worried about chromatic aberration or vibration reduction controls. The 70-200mm holds a place in my heart because it allows me to capture the love and adoration I have for my children. I can make precious memories. My 70-200mm is an emotional favorite. It’s a very personal preference. It is a beautiful, durable, incredible lens that helps me succeed in my business – but it also helps me to capture personal memories.

dPS Writer's Favorite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

Capturing joy; I think it’s a great reason to love this lens.

dPS Writer's Favorite Lenses: I'm Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8

I could have zoomed in more, but I wanted to capture the environment too.

Your favorite lens

What’s your favorite lens? Share it with us in the comments below. Maybe you love your inexpensive 18-55mm kit lens. Tell us why. We want to hear your stories. Forget the specs, what kinds of joy does the lens bring to your life?

My teenager has become so jaded that my 70-200mm is the only way I can capture images of him.

The post dPS Writer’s Favorite Lenses: I’m Torn Between My Nifty Fifty and 70-200mm F2.8 by Erin Fitzgibbon appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Lensrentals and the continuing saga of the broken Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM

04 Mar

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Last week we took a look at Lensrentals’ six hour initial disassembly of a broken Sony FE 70-200 F2.8 GM lens (would hate to be the person who dropped it!). In part two, the guys from LR continue to take apart the lens, to see if it can be saved or sent to the scrapyard.

Read LensRentals’ Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM Teardown (Part 2)

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Lensrentals and the mysterious case of the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM

25 Feb

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One lens’ bad fortune is our gain: the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM’s optical test results had been puzzling the team at Lensrentals, and when a customer dropped one recently a teardown was in order. The teardown took a total of six hours – twice the usual amount of time required – and along the way they found a lot of solidly constructed pieces, a mysterious component they dubbed the ‘Southern Fairy Tale Ring,’ and a great deal of silicone glue.

This article details the first part of the teardown, showing the disassembly of the first half of the lens up to the point where a snack break was needed. It’s a long read but as always, thoroughly fascinating and entertaining. It turns out that construction of the FE 70-200mm F2.8 is a bit unconventional, and that’s not a bad thing at all.

Read LensRentals’ Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS Teardown (Part 1)

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma announces 14mm F1.8, 24-70mm F2.8 and 135mm F1.8 Art lenses

21 Feb

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Sigma has released a trio of its high-end ‘Art’ lenses: two primes and one zoom. All three are designed for full-frame Canon, Nikon and Sigma bodies.

The first is the ultra-wide 14mm F1.8 DG HSM, which Sigma claims is the ‘world’s first and only F1.8 ultra-wide-angle lens.’  The lens has 16 elements, three of which are FLD (low dispersion) and four are SLD (super-low-dispersion). It also has a large (80mm) aspherical front element to reduce distortion and ‘deliver outstanding image quality from the center to the edges.’ The 14mm F1.8 has 9 rounded aperture blades, a minimum focus distance of 27cm/11in and a ring-type ultrasonic (HSM) focus motor.

Next up is the Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art. This lens features three SLD and four aspherical, nine rounded aperture blades and optical image stabilization. The lens is weather-sealed and made of a combination of metal and ‘thermally stable composite’ material. The minimum focus distance of the 24-70 is 37cm/1.5in and it uses 82mm filters.

Last, but certainly not least, is the 135mm F1.8 DG HSM telephoto prime. Sigma says that this lens ‘offers the […] resolution required for 50MP or higher ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs.’ It has a hypersonic (ring-type ultrasonic) focus motor that delivers fast (and ‘exceptionally stable’) focus speeds, while an acceleration sensor ‘detects the orientation of the lens’ so the AF system can respond to ‘varying loads on the focusing group due to gravity.’

The lens has 9 rounded aperture blades, dust and splashproof construction, and a weight of 1130g/40.2oz.

Pricing and availability for all three lenses will be announced at a date to be determined.

Press Releases:

SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM
Introducing the world’s first and only* F1.8 ultra-wide-angle lens

A true high-speed lens that delivers a new dimension of visual experience

*Among interchangeable lens for digital SLRs as of February 2017

  1. 14mm ultra-wide angle of view and F1.8 brightness deliver a new dimension of visual experience
  2. Seventh 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line
  3. Other features 

A true high-speed lens that delivers a new dimension of visual experience

In taking photographs of starry skies or other celestial scenes at night, or of the seashore with a wide perspective, a large-diameter lens is a strong ally, since it allows the capture of a moving subject by adjusting shutter speed without relying on ISO sensitivity. With its full-frame 35mm coverage, 14mm focal length for an ultra-wide angle of view, F2 barrier-breaking F1.8, the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art is the true high-speed ultra-wide-angle lens for which so many photographers have been waiting. Although some zoom lenses are available that can cover 14mm, the large diameter delivering F1.8 brightness is a singular advantage. Going beyond fast shutter speed, this lens can capture a swarm of fireflies with crystal clarity, a beautiful bokeh effect, and outstanding control of light streaking.

?Key features?

  1. 14mm ultra-wide angle of view and F1.8 brightness deliver a new dimension of visual experience

By leveraging its extreme angle of view and the dramatic perspective this creates, an ultra-wide-angle lens can get up close and personal with a subject while at the same time taking in a vast background—an example of photography going beyond normal human vision.

SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art combines the extremely deep depth of field that comes from an ultra-wide angle of view with the extremely shallow depth of field that comes from F1.8 brightness. The result is a sharply captured subject set against a vast background dramatically blurred with a beautiful bokeh effect. It is a highly impressive mode of photographic expression that until now simply has not existed.

  • Minimized chromatic aberrations

Three FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) glass elements and four SLD (Super Low Dispersion) glass elements help minimize transverse chromatic aberration, which tends to be noticeable in shots taken with ultra-wide-angle lenses. The result is outstanding image quality from the center of the image to the edges.

  • Featuring a large-diameter aspherical lens element

The SIGMA 12-24mmF4 DG HSM | Art was the first SIGMA lens to feature a large ?80mm aspherical lens element. Building on the expertise derived from this success, the new lens features a large ?80mm precision-molded glass aspherical lens as its front element. This technology has made possible the 14mm F1.8 specification—the first of its kind.

  • Minimized distortion

Serving as the front lens element, the large ?80mm precision-molded glass aspherical lens effectively minimizes distortion. Offering excellent peripheral brightness, this lens delivers outstanding image quality from the center to the edges.

  • Distinctive bokeh effect

Even at the 14mm ultra-wide-angle of view, F1.8 brightness makes possible a very shallow depth of field with the subject standing out dramatically against a bokeh background. It’s the unique mode of expression that only a large-diameter lens can deliver. 

  1. Seventh 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line

Launched in 2012, the SIGMA 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art was the first lens in the Art line. Since then, SIGMA has developed a wide variety of lenses for the line, and the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art is the seventh prime lens in the line to offer 35mm full-frame coverage. Now even stronger, the Art line sets the new standard for prime lenses in the ultra-high-megapixel era.

  1. Other features
  • Fast AF with full-time manual override

Note: The operation of full-time MF may vary based on mount type

  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • Rounded diaphragm
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release

SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM
Top-level performance optimized for the era of ultra-high-megapixel cameras

  1. The large-diameter standard zoom ideal for today’s ultra-high-megapixel digital cameras
  2. OS functionality and newly designed HSM for success on any shoot
  3. Lens barrel designed for high rigidity
  4. Other features?

The definitive large-diameter standard zoom lens for any shoot

What photographers demand from the 24-70mm F2.8 specification is much more than outstanding image quality. They want all the features that make this a go-to lens for a wide range of photographic opportunities, including optical design ideal for the latest ultra-high-megapixel digital cameras, hypersonic motor (HSM) for high-speed autofocus, optical stabilizer (OS) with powerful stabilization effect, dust- and splash-proof mount with rubber sealing, and a metal barrel for a stable, rigid feel. This all-new 24-70mm F2.8 lens from SIGMA delivers the performance and functionality that help pros succeed in news, nature, and many other fields of photography.

?Key features?

  1. The large-diameter standard zoom ideal for today’s ultra-high-megapixel digital cameras 
  • Outstanding optical performance

Three SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass lens elements and four aspherical lens elements help minimize optical aberrations. To ensure outstanding image quality from the center to the edges of the photograph, the optical system minimizes coma, which causes points of light to streak, and transverse chromatic aberration, which cannot be corrected via aperture control, The optical system also minimizes distortion, which can be particularly evident in wide-angle shots, resulting in excellent optical performance throughout the zoom range.

  • A 24-70mm F2.8 lens that meets the high standards of the Art line

SIGMA has continuously pioneered 24-70mm F2.8 lenses that are a step ahead of the times. The first model of this specification, SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 EX DG ASPHERICAL DF, launched in 2001. Representing the fourth generation of the family, the new SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | Art accomplishes a challenging feat in optical design: incorporating optical stabilizer functionality in a large-diameter standard zoom. By leveraging all of its design and manufacturing expertise, SIGMA has ensured that this new lens fulfills the uncompromising requirements of the Art line for image and build quality.

  • Bokeh that is a cut above

At wide-open aperture, this lens offers outstanding photographic expression. The area in focus is extremely sharp, while the background exhibits a beautiful bokeh effect with only slight spherical aberration. Since large-diameter zoom lenses are often used at wide-open aperture, SIGMA has paid close attention to the shape of the bokeh, aiming for perfect circularity. 

  • Incorporating advanced aspherical lens processing technology

Aspherical lenses necessitate refined expertise in the design and manufacturing of advanced, high-performance lenses. SIGMA’s first products to feature this technology were the SIGMA 12-24mm F4 DG HSM | Art and SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art, which both incorporated a large ?80mm aspherical lens as their front lens element. Building on the success of these predecessors, the SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art incorporates an aspherical lens element that helps achieve extremely high resolution. This element is much thicker at the center than the edges, and forming its unusual shape is a feat of manufacturing technology. Moreover, SIGMA processes the surface of this aspherical lens element with ultra-precise tolerances that are measured in hundredths of a micrometer. This extremely fine surface allows the SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art to deliver a very natural and smooth bokeh effect, without the visible concentric rings that afflict typical aspherical lens elements.

  1. OS functionality and newly designed HSM for success on any shoot

Designed for advanced utility in a wide variety of situations, the optical stabilizer (OS) offers a powerful stabilization effect. The newly designed large hypersonic motor (HSM) offers 1.3 times the torque of its predecessor and exceptionally stable performance even at lower speeds.

* Based on CIPA’s guideline. Measuring at telephoto end, when it is attached to the camera with 35mm image sensor.

  1. Lens barrel designed for high rigidity

Since large-diameter standard zoom lenses tend to serve as a go-to lens and see frequent use, the SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art is designed to stand up to the challenging shooting environments that pros encounter. To this end, the lens barrel contains a large amount of metal, while the external moving parts feature thermally stable composite (TSC), which is resistant to thermal expansion and contraction. This structure contributes not only to the outstanding optical performance of the lens but also to its high rigidity and confidence-inspiring build quality.

  1. Other features
  • Mount with dust- and splash-proof design

Since the area of the lens most vulnerable to dust and other foreign bodies is the mount, rubber sealing helps provide peace of mind. In addition, the front lens element features a water- and oil-repellent coating that helps the lens perform well in the rain, near water, and in other challenging conditions.

  • Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included

The Nikon mount version of this lens includes an electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism that allows it to receive the appropriate signals from the camera body. This feature ensures precision diaphragm control and stable Auto Exposure (AE) performance during continuous shooting.

Note: Functionality may be limited on some camera bodies.

  • Fast AF with full-time manual focus
  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • Rounded diaphragm
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release

SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM
With F1.8 brightness, this telephoto lens for full-frame cameras further strengthens the Art line’s prime options

  1. The ultimate 135mm telephoto designed to prioritize optical performance
  2. Fast and nimble autofocus photography
  3. Sixth 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line
  4. Other features? 

Introducing the ultimate 135mm telephoto featuring top-level performance

135mm telephoto lenses are often categorized as the foundational telephoto, the first one to add to a lens collection. This focal length delivers a strong perspective compression effect, while the large diameter with F1.8 brightness provides a dramatic bokeh effect. By minimizing axial chromatic aberration, the SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art makes this bokeh effect not only impressive but also beautiful while delivering superb contrast and sharp image quality in every shot. It offers the outstanding resolution required for 50MP or higher ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs. By incorporating its latest innovations in design and optical glass and rethinking every aspect of the lens, SIGMA has ensured outstanding image quality all the way to the edges, establishing the new standard in 135mm telephoto lenses.

With resolution so crystal-clear that individual hairs can be discerned in a portrait, this large-diameter lens also delivers a beautiful bokeh effect, giving photographers everything they need. It is ideal for close-ups and full-body shots, with subjects standing out against a pleasantly blurred background. In addition to standard portraits, including bridal shots, this lens is a top performer for live events, with its super-fast autofocus capturing subjects with ease.

?Key features?

  1. The ultimate 135mm telephoto designed to prioritize optical performance
  • Image quality optimal for ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs

To deliver the ultra-high resolution that brings the best out of 50MP or higher ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs, the focus mechanism features SIGMA’s floating system. No matter what the distance from the subject, this lens offers top performance from the center to the edges of the image. By minimizing distortion as well, the lens delivers impeccable image quality—no need for digital adjustment during image processing.

  • Ideal for portraits requiring a dramatic bokeh effect

The 135mm focal length delivers a stunning compression effect: even fairly close to the subject, the telephoto ring allows the photographer to establish a variety of dramatic perspectives. The compression effect truly shines in both close-ups and full-length portraits, making composition easy. Moreover, the large diameter with F1.8 brightness makes possible a body shot with an impressive bokeh background. In sum, this lens puts a full menu of compositional options at the photographer’s fingertips.

  1. Fast and nimble autofocus photography

The large hypersonic motor (HSM) offers two benefits. It delivers ample torque to the focusing group for outstanding speed, ensuring exceptionally stable performance even at lower speeds. The acceleration sensor detects the orientation of the lens, allowing the autofocus system to respond to varying loads on the focusing group due to gravity. Along with the optimized AF algorithm, these features deliver fast autofocus photography. In addition, the focus limiter makes AF highly responsive to distance from the subject for even more nimble performance.

  1. Sixth 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line

Launched in 2012, the SIGMA 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art was the first lens in the Art line. Since then, SIGMA has developed a wide variety of lenses for the line, and the SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM?Art is the sixth prime lens in the line to offer 35mm full-frame coverage. Now even stronger, the Art line sets the new standard for prime lenses in the ultra-high-megapixel era.

  1. Other features 
  • Fast AF with full-time manual override

Note: The operation of full-time MF may vary based on mount type

  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Mount with dust- and splash-proof construction
  • Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • Rounded diaphragm
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release

Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM / 135mm F1.8 DG HSM specifications

  Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art
Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 14 mm 135 mm
Image stabilization No
Lens mount Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Sigma SA Bayonet
Aperture
Maximum aperture F1.8
Minimum aperture F16
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Optics
Elements 16 13
Groups 11 10
Special elements / coatings Three FLD and four SLD elements
Focus
Minimum focus 0.27 m (10.63) 0.88 m (34.65)
Maximum magnification 0.1× 0.2×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Ring-type ultrasonic
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Focus notes Floating focus mechanism
Distance scale Yes
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter No Yes
Physical
Weight 1170 g (2.58 lb) 1130 g (2.49 lb)
Diameter 95 mm (3.76) 91 mm (3.6)
Length 126 mm (4.96) 115 mm (4.52)
Sealing Yes
Colour Black
Filter thread 82.0 mm
Hood supplied Yes
Tripod collar No

Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Zoom lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 24–70 mm
Image stabilization Yes
Lens mount Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Sigma SA Bayonet
Aperture
Maximum aperture F2.8
Minimum aperture F22
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Optics
Elements 19
Groups 14
Special elements / coatings Three HLD and four aspherical elements
Focus
Minimum focus 0.37 m (14.57)
Maximum magnification 0.21×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Ring-type ultrasonic
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale Yes
DoF scale No
Physical
Diameter 88 mm (3.46)
Length 108 mm (4.24)
Materials Metal
Sealing Yes
Colour Black
Zoom method Rotary (extending)
Power zoom No
Zoom lock No
Filter thread 82.0 mm
Hood supplied Yes
Hood product code LH876-04
Tripod collar No

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified

18 Feb

Sony’s new STF (Smooth Trans Focus) 100mm F2.8 GM OSS uses an apodization (APD) filter to create very smooth out-of-focus regions/highlights both in front of, and behind, the focal plane.

But how exactly does it work? Sony has published a video demonstrating the principle, and the effect. Take a look:

The apodization element is a circular graduated neutral density filter that lets in more central light rays than peripheral light rays. This smooths out transitions between out-of-focus elements, leading to quite unique imagery.

The APD element is a (circular) graduated neutral density filter inserted into the optical path of the lens. Out-of-focus light rays that are either converging in front of the focal plane, or diverging behind the focal plane, have a gradual radial softening (seen as darkening of the more oblique rays in front of or behind the focal plane). This yields less interference between out-of-focus light rays and, so, less ‘busy’ and simply smoother bokeh. 

What’s the real-world impact? Have a look at the image comparison below, which compares the foreground and background bokeh with and without the APD element:

The APD element leads to smoother foreground and background bokeh. Note how out-of-focus highlights are smoothed, and this applies to everything. There’s a cost though: sometimes I like sharp, enlarged de-blurred out-of-focus highlights, which you won’t get with this lens. But what you will get is smooth, creamy bokeh.

We’ve had very little time with the lens, but our initial impressions of image quality are extremely positive. If you’d like to learn more about the lens, visit the company’s dedicated page on this lens over at Sony Alpha Universe, then take a look at the phenomenal MTF curves on Sony.com’s site. Yes, this is a sharp lens, but with beautiful bokeh. And image stabilization, to boot, which, combined with IBIS on most E-mount cameras, will allow you to use slow-ish shutter speeds to maximize light gathering, minimizing noise.

Which you’ll need, because wide open, while you have the depth-of-field of F2.8, you have the light transmission of F5.6.

Sony’s E-mount system is becoming increasingly hard to ignore for professional results. With the release of the 100mm STF GM and 85/1.8 lenses, Sony is rounding out a format that already accepts arguably the largest lens lineup in history (thanks to its short flange distance). But the importance of a native lineup cannot be over-stressed, as it is native lenses that benefit most from Sony’s AF technologies.

A note on autofocus…

Similar STF lenses tend to be manual focus or contrast detect-only, since peripheral light rays – the very ones the filter is designed to block out – are necessary for traditional phase-detect sensors to function. However, since (at least Sony’s) on-sensor PDAF sensors can still use more central light rays for focusing, focusing does still work, remarkably well in fact with the a7R II, even indoors, wide open. That’s quite an achievement, in no small part due to the excellent focusing system of the a7R II. What’s more, movement of the focus element(s) is incredibly fast, thanks to the excellent Direct Drive SSM mechanism we’ve seen in blazingly fast-to-focus lenses like the FE 35mm F1.4 and FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM.

“Unlike Sony’s recent releases, this lens focuses wide open…”

In other words, I was able to use to the 100mm STF to focus on faces, even using Eye AF, in fairly low indoor lighting, despite the T5.6 rating at a F2.8 aperture. This is in no small part due to the fact that this lens, unlike Sony’s recent releases, focuses wide open (albeit stopping down after initial acquisition in AF-C). More tests to follow, but simply the fact they got phase-detect AF working, nevermind the AF performance, is nothing short of impressive.

The FE 100mm F2.8 STF GM OSS is already shaping up to be a spectacular lens, adding to an already well-rounded, serious E-mount lens lineup.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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