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Posts Tagged ‘Epic’

Photographer Dad creates epic Star Wars Christmas card for his family

07 Dec

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Photographer Josh Rossi is no stranger to creating epic photography for and of his family. His portraits of his daughter as Wonder Woman swept across the Internet like wildfire, and he’s continued doing amazing work, including this touching series where he transformed disabled kids into Justice League superheroes.

So why did he let some run-of-the-mill “family photographer” take last year’s Christmas pictures for him!?

He didn’t know either. In fact, he felt deeply ashamed by this lapse in judgement, and so he set to work creating something amazing to redeem himself this Holiday season. Cue Star Wars theme.

“I’m a huge Star Wars fan, and my wife has been asking me to do some pictures of us so I went all out this year for our family photos,” Rossi tells DPReview. And by all-out, he means he recreated the Star Wars: The Last Jedi posters featuring himself, his wife, and their two children instead of the lead actors.

“I had such a fun time doing this with my family,” he told us, “especially with my 1 year old.”

Rossi sent over a few behind the scenes images for us (below) and you can see the final shots in the gallery at the top.

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To see more of Rossi’s work, or if you just want to say hello and kudos for another really creative and well-executed project, head over to his website or give him a follow on Instagram and Facebook.


All photographs by Josh Rossi and used with permission.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Photo of the week: An epic dancer shoot in an inverted room

27 Aug

A month ago, I got in touch with my old friends over at Little Boxes Theater—a recreational performance art/photography studio in San Francisco—about shooting a fun personal project. Since I love to fabricate things in my workshop for shoots, I asked if they’d be up for collaborating on something along those lines.

Aaron Simunovich (one of the studio managers), had a lot of experience woodworking, and threw out the idea of an inverted room. Without any doubts, I said something along the lines of, “yes, let’s make this happen right now.” I immediately got to work on a detailed 3D model of what it might look like structurally, and from there, we budgeted what material we’d need in order to get this set done.

I spent the following 5 days commuting over the San Francisco bridge, gradually building the set with Aaron, and us making frequent trips to the hardware stores… and junkyards. This was all a big experiment, but I called my good friend Valentina Reneff-Olson to model, since this trippy composition just called for a flexible dancer. Combine this two-wall set with a bit of intricate posing, and you end up with a series of photos that emulate anti-gravity perfectly.

Generally, the concept was to have the dancer shooting out of what looked like a painting/mirror frame. Oh yeah, and rain. There was rain.

Technical Details

If I told you how long we actually shot for, you’d probably think I was exaggerating. The truth is, once we had everybody at the studio, we only had 2 hours to get something good. Since I had to travel back to LA for an upcoming shoot, and their studio was booked out, there was just no way to do it the following day.

Little Boxes Theater likes to store set designs in-house, but since I don’t live anywhere near San Francisco, I was not going to leave back to Los Angeles without content that was up to my expectations. Two hours to get both photo and video content? No pressure.

*Game face*

Since I wanted to test the stills and slow motion of my new GH5, I used that body with a 25mm f/1.7 lens, and did everything handheld with the 5-axis stabilization turned on. There were two lighting setups being used simultaneously:

One for stills:

  • Two 600w heads
  • Reflector

One for video:

  • LED panel
  • Reflector
  • 1K Arri fresnel

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Since I was shooting slow motion at a higher shutter speed, I was really pushing the GH5 settings to see how it performed on this test. The power output of the strobes overpowered the constant lights, so for stills we just kept the constant lights on to help with auto-focus.

Together, we all improvised a bunch of choreography and posing for Valentina to follow, and our stylist, Virginie Suos, switched out the clothing after each video sequence in the rain. I got oddly comfortable shooting atop a scaffolding, with my head tilted 90º the whole time.

This shoot ended up being 75% stills and 25% video, so the minute-long short film that I threw together was cut only from about 6 shots only.

To that I’d say: “not too shabby Daniel, not too shabby.”

Check out the full behind the scenes video below:


Daniel DeArco is a Los Angeles-based photographer, filmmaker, and inventor who first picked up a camera in 2011 after he severely broke his neck. Since then, he’s made a name shooting creative portraits and commercial work. You can find more of his work on his website, Instagram, and YouTube.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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This video compares a $50 Sony camcorder with a $50,000 RED Epic Dragon

28 Jul

Ever wonder whether a more expensive camera is truly worth the cost? Sam and Niko of Corridor recently set out to compare footage from a $ 50 Sony HD camcorder and the RED Epic Dragon, a $ 50,000 6K cinema camera. As you’d expect, the differences are immediately apparent, cost aside, when the two cameras are put side-by-side: the RED camera’s lens alone is about the same size as the entire Sony camcorder.

The RED Epic Dragon has proven capable many times throughout its life, with perhaps one of the model’s most notable achievements being a trip into space where it was used by NASA astronauts to capture images from the International Space Station. The RED camera has also been used for several major Hollywood movies. The Sony HD camcorder used in the video, however, is a simple model with a low price point aimed at the average consumer.

At nearly 15 minutes in length, the comparison video above runs through several major aspects of both cameras’ footage, looking at things like noise level, exposure, low-light performance, post-processing results and more. As expected, the RED camera dominates in each category. More of the team’s videos can be found on the ‘Sam and Niko’ YouTube channel.

Via: iso1200

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Throwback Thursday: The Olympus Stylus Epic and my love for clamshell cameras

19 Aug

Bring back the clamshell!

From left to right: The Olympus Stylus Epic, The Olympus [mju :] II, The Olympus XA. The first two are the same camera (different names for different markets), the latter started my love for clamshell cameras.

My love affair with the clamshell camera design started with the Olympus XA and ultimately lead me to the Olympus Stylus Epic, also know as the Olympus [mju:] II in the Japanese market (pronounced mew two, like the Pokémon). It’s a funky plastic 90’s style camera that to the untrained eye, looks a little like a piece of junk.

Both the Olympus XA, released in 1979, and the Stylus Epic, released in 1997, feature excellent fixed 35mm F2.8 lenses and Olympus’ brilliant clamshell design. The XA is an aperture priority-only rangefinder, while the Stylus Epic is a fully automatic camera with a three spot autofocus system and built-in flash.

Open/On Closed/Off

Due to its ease-of-use, small size and sharp lens, the Stylus Epic is my go anywhere camera (the XA I use mainly for street photography and travel). I’ve long searched for the perfect camera to slide in my back pocket every time I leave the house and this soap-shaped oddball is the one for me. It’s not as cool looking as a Ricoh R1 (which I also shoot with occasionally), but I’ve found it to be much more reliable.

If you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m a huge camera nerd and a big supporter of shooting analog. Film photography offers a nice balance to my daily concentration on digital photography for DPReview (my analog site is PopularAmerican.club). It also helps me to slow down and practice decisiveness. Of course the Stylus Epic, being a fully automatic camera, isn’t exactly encouraging me to work on fundamentals, but it does free me up to be more in the moment and act on instinct.

While these cameras are mostly fully automatic, they feature good metering.

The major selling points of the Olympus Stylus Epic are as follows: it is a full-frame, 35mm camera with an excellent (and reasonably fast) lens in my favorite focal length, it weighs a mere 5.1 oz and is no larger than a Sony RX100 series camera (which weighs nearly double). It’s also weather-sealed and built extremely tough, despite its plastic appearance. Lastly, its strange curved design makes it easy to slide in and out of a pocket.

The Olympus Stylus Epic is about the same size as a Sony RX100-series camera and about half the weight.

But hands down my favorite feature of the Epic is its clamshell. There’s no on/off switch – simply slide it open and it’s ready to shoot. It’s essentially a lens cap that doubles as a power switch, and it’s brilliant.

“It’s essentially a lens cap that doubles as a power switch, and it’s brilliant.”

Of course, Olympus didn’t abandon the clamshell design when it moved to digital around the turn of the century. There were plenty of tiny sensor compacts that featured clamshells. But at some point, they were no more. I haven’t pinpointed when the last one was released (if you know, shout it out in the comments,) but it seems by around 2007, the clamshell had been phased out entirely.

But why? Perhaps aesthetically, the design was too dated-looking. Or perhaps due to the decline in sales of compacts, Olympus moved in a different direction. Whatever the reason, I implore you, Olympus, bring back the clamshell!

There are, of course, several excellent large sensor fixed lens digital compacts on the market, though only the Ricoh GR and Nikon A can really be considered pocketable (the Fujifilm X70 is just slightly too big IMHO.)

These cameras are cool, but they suffer from one flaw. Most of them extend their lens when turned on, a design execution made to keep the overall package compact. But what happens when the camera is accidentally turned on in your bag or pocket and the lens attempts to extend with nowhere to go? The point is, I like a lot of the digital fixed lens compacts on the market, but ultimately I find them to be somewhat fragile, an undesirable quality for a take-anywhere camera. Furthermore, none of the pocketable ones are weather-sealed and only the Leica Q and Sony RX1R offer a full-frame sensor to match that of my Stylus Epic. Both are also large (un-pocketable) and expensive.

The Stylus Epic extends its lens only to focus when the shutter is pressed.

So is it possible to make a modern camera as small as the Stylus Epic, without an extending lens, while retaining a relatively large sensor? We’ve been following along with Sony’s development of a curved sensor for a while now, and reading back through our coverage got me thinking: perhaps this technology is the key a digital reincarnation of my beloved Stylus Epic.

Available settings include: flash on, flash off, red eye reduction, slow synchro (night scene flash), slow synchro plus red eye and spot mode (which requires pressing both back buttons simultaneously to engage). I mostly keep it on the default setting. Unfortunately the only mode the camera retains after being turned off and back on is red eye reduction. I’ve read a lot of complaints that the Epic doesn’t recall the “flash off” setting once turned off, which I tend to agree is very annoying.

As far as designing a 90’s throwback, manufacturers are obviously very comfortable tapping into classic design styles; take the Olympus PEN-F and pretty much every recent Fujifilm X-camera, for instance. But up until now, these throwback designs have all come from cameras released in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. I think its about time we had some throwback designs from the 80’s and 90’s and a reincarnation of the Epic seems like the perfect place to start!

To be fair, the Olympus Stylus Epic does extend the lens barrel, but not until the shutter has been fully pressed. This leads to a very slight shutter delay, but it is hardly noticeable.

I’m not even asking for a full-framer, but even a 1″-type sensor, fixed lens compact with a fast 35mm-equivalent lens would do it for me. Just make sure it’s pocketable, has a good flash, is weather sealed and is built like a tank. So Olympus, if you’re reading this, please consider a reboot of my dear Stylus Epic. Just don’t forget the clamshell!

Curvy beauty.

Is there a classic film camera you’d like to see a a digital reincarnation of? Let us know in the comments!

*A previous version of this article incorrectly stated the Epic uses a curved film plane.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Throwback Thursday: The Olympus Stylus Epic and my love for clamshell cameras

18 Aug

Bring back the clamshell!

From left to right: The Olympus Stylus Epic, The Olympus [mju :] II, The Olympus XA. The first two are the same camera (different names for different markets), the latter started my love for clamshell cameras.

My love affair with the clamshell camera design started with the Olympus XA and ultimately lead me to the Olympus Stylus Epic, also know as the Olympus [mju:] II in the Japanese market (pronounced mew two, like the Pokémon). It’s a funky plastic 90’s style camera that to the untrained eye, looks a little like a piece of junk.

Both the Olympus XA, released in 1979, and the Stylus Epic, released in 1997, feature excellent fixed 35mm F2.8 lenses and Olympus’ brilliant clamshell design. The XA is an aperture priority-only rangefinder, while the Stylus Epic is a fully automatic camera with a three spot autofocus system and built-in flash.

Open/On Closed/Off

Due to its ease-of-use, small size and sharp lens, the Stylus Epic is my go anywhere camera (the XA I use mainly for street photography and travel). I’ve long searched for the perfect camera to slide in my back pocket every time I leave the house and this soap-shaped oddball is the one for me. It’s not as cool looking as a Ricoh R1 (which I also shoot with occasionally), but I’ve found it to be much more reliable.

If you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m a huge camera nerd and a big supporter of shooting analog. Film photography offers a nice balance to my daily concentration on digital photography for DPReview (my analog site is PopularAmerican.club). It also helps me to slow down and practice decisiveness. Of course the Stylus Epic, being a fully automatic camera, isn’t exactly encouraging me to work on fundamentals, but it does free me up to be more in the moment and act on instinct.

While these cameras are mostly fully automatic, they feature outstanding metering.

The major selling points of the Olympus Stylus Epic are as follows: it is a full-frame, 35mm camera with an excellent (and reasonably fast) lens in my favorite focal length, it weighs a mere 5.1 oz and is no larger than a Sony RX100 series camera (which weighs nearly double). It’s also weather-sealed and built extremely tough, despite its plastic appearance. Lastly, it’s strange curved design makes it easy to slide in and out of a pocket.

The Olympus Stylus Epic is about the same size as a Sony RX100-series camera and about half the weight.

But hands down my favorite feature of the Epic is its clamshell. There’s no on/off switch – simply slide it open and it’s ready to shoot. It’s essentially a lens cap that doubles as a power switch, and it’s brilliant.

“It’s essentially a lens cap that doubles as a power switch, and it’s brilliant.”

Of course, Olympus didn’t abandon the clamshell design when its moved to digital around the turn of the century. There were plenty of tiny sensor compacts that featured clamshells. But at some point, they were no more. I haven’t pinpointed when the last one was released (if you know, shout it out in the comments,) but it seems by around 2007, the clamshell had been phased out entirely.

But why? Perhaps aesthetically, the design was too dated-looking. Or perhaps due to the decline in sales of compacts, Olympus moved in a different direction. Whatever the reason, I implore you, Olympus, bring back the clamshell!

There are, of course, several excellent large sensor fixed lens digital compacts on the market, though only the Ricoh GR and Nikon A can really be considered pocketable (the Fujifilm X70 is just slightly too big IMHO.)

These cameras are cool, but my biggest beef with them is their design, or rather the weak point of their design. Most of them extend their lens when turned on, a design execution made to keep the overall package compact. But what happens when the camera is accidentally turned on in your bag or pocket and the lens attempts to extend with nowhere to go? The point is, these cameras are great, but ultimately I find them to be a bit fragile, an undesirable quality for a take-anywhere camera. Furthermore, none of the pocketable ones are weather-sealed and only the Leica Q and Sony RX1R offer a full-frame sensor to match that of my Stylus Epic. Both are also large (un-pocketable) and expensive.

So how then does the Stylus Epic retain its incredibly small size, despite its full-frame ‘sensor?’  By utilizing a curved film plane, of course! This not only helps keep things shrunken, but the curvature of the film plane matches that of the lens. This is also a major reason that the Epic is so darn sharp.

Available settings include: flash on, flash off, red eye reduction, slow synchro (night scene flash), slow synchro plus red eye and spot mode (which requires pressing both back buttons simultaneously to engage). I mostly keep it on the default setting. Unfortunately the only mode the camera retains after being turned off and back on is red eye reduction. I’ve read a lot of complaints that the Epic doesn’t recall the “flash off” setting once turned off, which I tend to agree is very annoying.

We’ve been following along with Sony’s development of a curved sensor for a while now, and reading back through our coverage got me thinking: could this new sensor technology make it possible to create a digital reincarnation of my beloved Stylus Epic? Totally. Do I think Olympus should make it happen? Oh, hell yes.

Camera companies are obviously very comfortable tapping into classic design styles; take the Olympus PEN-F and pretty much every recent Fujifilm X-camera, for instance. But up until now, these throwback designs have all come from cameras released in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. I think its about time we had some throwback designs from the 80’s and 90’s and a reincarnation of the Epic seems like the perfect place to start!

To be fair, the Olympus Stylus Epic does extend the lens barrel, but not until the shutter has been fully pressed. This leads to a very slight shutter delay, but it is hardly noticeable.

I’m not asking for a full-framer, but even a 1″-type sensor, fixed lens compact with a fast 35mm-equivalent lens would do it for me. Just don’t forget to make sure it’s pocketable, has a good flash, is weather sealed and built like a tank (no extending the lens when turned on). So Olympus, if you’re reading this, please consider a reboot of my dear Stylus Epic. Just don’t forget the clamshell!

Curvy beauty.

Is there a classic film camera you’d like to see a a digital reincarnation of? Let us know in the comments!

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Photokina 2014: Hands-on with RED’s Epic Dragon

20 Sep

How does the idea of capturing 100 19MP Raw files per second sound? That’s what RED’s latest camera, the RED Dragon can do, courtesy of its 6K video capture mode. Fully modular, the RED Dragon can be adapted to accept a multitude of lens mounts, and although intended for professional movie shooting, its still image quality is seriously impressive too. We got a quick tour of RED’s latest magic machines at the company’s stand. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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The Epic Bundle and Another Giveaway Demand Your Attention

19 Jun

Remember Inky Deals? We’ve been telling you about them from time to time now, always when they have some type of amazing deal, bundle or giveaway for you. Hey, we wouldn’t waste your time in any case! Guess what time it is, this month? That’s right…it’s yet another too-good-to-be-true deal from Inky Deals. This time, Inky Deals doesn’t just have Continue Reading

The post The Epic Bundle and Another Giveaway Demand Your Attention appeared first on Photodoto.


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Red Epic Dragon jumps to top of DxOMark Sensor charts with score of 101

04 Mar

DxOMark-logo-520.jpg

Over the past few years, DxOMark’s tests and scores have provided a numerical measure for the Raw image quality potential of cameras. They’ve therefore been debated at some length by enthusiasts looking to see where their favourite model stands in the rankings. Now there’s a new DxOMark Sensor score champion, but perhaps surprisingly, the first camera to break the 100-point barrier isn’t a full frame model from Nikon or Sony, but the RED Epic Dragon movie camera. Click through for details and a link to the full report. 

News: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Explore Everything: Epic Book Shows How to Hack Cities

22 Oct

[ By WebUrbanist in Global & Urbex & Parkour. ]

urban exploration guide book

Combining harrowing first-hand experiences, vivid images and historical context, urban explorer and photographer Bradly L. Garrett takes his readers on a stunning in-depth tour through the hidden world of urban exploration and building infiltration. This trip passes through the sewers and subway tunnels of London, over bridges and skyscrapers of New York, and slip you in between derelict buildings and abandoned places around the world.

urban crane tower climb

Explore Everything: Place-Hacking the City (from Verso Books) is more accessible than a manifesto yet more revealing than a manual. In highly readable and engaging prose, it manages to combine personal storytelling and thoughtful reflection with factual urban histories and practical tips for exploring secret spaces.

urban tunnel vertical view

If you are looking for a coffee-table book of eye candy to flip through, this is not the one for you, but there are plenty of those already. Instead, this is a rarer sort of volume that goes far deeper, drawing on meticulous notes, handmade maps, diligent research and many years of direct experience.

urban paris rooftop

urban deserted building structure

urban derelict building decay

urban tunnel graffiti art

urban subway tunnel

Like something from a China Miéville or Neil Gaiman novel, this author reveals that there truly is a layer of fantastic mystery behind, between or below the surfaces of any city. With stories of personal adventures, from climbing skyscrapers under construction to descending into derelict subway tunnels, Garrett conveys the hot sweat and cold fear experienced in his travels. At the same time, he manages to provide commentary that goes beyond the level of an explorer and into the realm of researcher and philosopher. His combination of first-hand and historical knowledge make this a book worth reading.

urban abandoned interior

urban detroit interior volume

The heavy volume may have travel anecdotes and photographs, but it is also not lacking in powerful insights and revealing opinions. Discussing Detroit, Garrett reveals the complexities of a city that is known for its abandonments but is simultaneously in many ways and places a “light, bright, vibrant, beautiful place” that is “full of life, events, politically active citizens, great places to go out” as well as “a plethora of sites ripe for infiltration.” He notes that “as images of decay had become culturally ubiqituitous in this city” many photographers have focused too hard on “sharp, vibrant, long-exposure photography” that produces stylized and idealized imagery that “look uncomfortably similar to traditional photos of colonial explorers, evoking images of white men sticking flags in the soil.” Detroiters sick of their city being seen as a one-sided wasteland will appreciate the author’s even-handed and open-minded approach to and appreciation of their home – and this is just one of many such examples.

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Epic fail? 70-200s of all makes among least reliable lenses

13 Aug

hidden_adjuster.jpg

Which words spring to mind when you think about 70-200mm zoom lenses – solid and dependable or fragile and unreliable? Lenrentals’ Roger Cicala has just published an analysis of the failure rates of the 12,000 lenses he rents out, and the results may surprise you. Even having taken into account popularity and accidental damage, five 70-200s turn up in his highest failure rate table – including the latest models from Canon and Nikon.

News: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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