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2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Cameras

10 Jun

Last updated: June 9, 2017

While most of new 1″ sensor enthusiast cameras have been on the shorter end of the focal length spectrum, there are now quite a few long zoom models, as well. Whether you want something pocketable or want to shoot for the moon (pun intended), you’ll find it in this group.

There are plenty of other long zoom compacts out there, some offering focal ranges reaching 2000mm though they use much smaller 1/2.3″ sensors. The larger sensors used in the cameras in this roundup completely eclipse those models, especially when it comes to image quality and control over depth-of-field.

The models we’re looking at in this article include:

  • Canon PowerShot G3 X
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2500/FZ2000
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100/TZ100
  • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10
  • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II
  • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 III

With the exception of the Panasonic ZS100/TZ100, all of these cameras are pretty hefty, so don’t plan on stuffing those into a pocket. Focal ranges are all over the map, ranging from 200mm on the Sony RX10 I/II to 600mm on the Sony RX10 III and Canon G3 X. The vast majority of these cameras shoot 4K video, with some having more controls than others.

To further help you pick the right camera in this class, we’ve created the chart below, which breaks down the equivalent aperture for each camera, as you work your way through the zoom range. Our article here explains the concept of equivalence, but at a high level all you need to know is that the lower the line is on the graph below, the blurrier the backgrounds you’ll be able to get and, typically at least, the better the overall low-light performance.

LensEquivalentApertures([“Equivalent focal length (mm)”,”Panasonic FZ1000″,”Sony RX10 II”,”Canon G3 X”,”Panasonic ZS100″,”Sony RX10 III”,”Panasonic FZ2500″], [[24,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Sony RX10 II at 24mm: F7.6″,7.6363636363636367,”Canon G3 X at 24mm: F7.6″,null,””,6.5454545454545459,”Sony RX10 III at 24mm: F6.5″,7.6363636363636367,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 24mm: F7.6″],[25,7.6363636363636367,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 25mm: F7.6″,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Panasonic ZS100 at 25mm: F7.6″,6.8181818181818183,”Sony RX10 III at 25mm: F6.8″,7.9090909090909092,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 25mm: F7.9″],[26,7.9090909090909092,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 26mm: F7.9″,null,””,null,””,7.9090909090909092,”Panasonic ZS100 at 26mm: F7.9″,null,””,null,””],[27,null,””,null,””,8.7272727272727284,”Canon G3 X at 27mm: F8.7″,8.1818181818181834,”Panasonic ZS100 at 27mm: F8.2″,null,””,null,””],[28,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Sony RX10 III at 28mm: F7.6″,8.1818181818181834,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 28mm: F8.2″],[30,8.1818181818181834,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 30mm: F8.2″,null,””,null,””,8.7272727272727284,”Panasonic ZS100 at 30mm: F8.7″,null,””,8.454545454545455,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 30mm: F8.5″],[32,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.0,”Panasonic ZS100 at 32mm: F9.0″,null,””,8.7272727272727284,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 32mm: F8.7″],[34,8.454545454545455,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 34mm: F8.5″,null,””,null,””,9.2727272727272734,”Panasonic ZS100 at 34mm: F9.3″,null,””,null,””],[35,null,””,null,””,9.5454545454545467,”Canon G3 X at 35mm: F9.5″,null,””,8.7272727272727284,”Sony RX10 III at 35mm: F8.7″,9.0,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 35mm: F9.0″],[36,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.5454545454545467,”Panasonic ZS100 at 36mm: F9.5″,null,””,null,””],[39,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.2727272727272734,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 39mm: F9.3″],[41,8.7272727272727284,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 41mm: F8.7″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[43,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.5454545454545467,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 43mm: F9.5″],[47,9.0,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 47mm: F9.0″,null,””,10.90909090909091,”Canon G3 X at 47mm: F10.9″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[49,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.81818181818182,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 49mm: F9.8″],[51,9.2727272727272734,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 51mm: F9.3″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[56,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.5454545454545467,”Sony RX10 III at 56mm: F9.5″,10.090909090909092,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 56mm: F10.1″],[58,9.5454545454545467,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 58mm: F9.5″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[60,null,””,null,””,12.272727272727273,”Canon G3 X at 60mm: F12.3″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[63,9.81818181818182,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 63mm: F9.8″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[69,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,10.363636363636363,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 69mm: F10.4″],[70,10.090909090909092,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 70mm: F10.1″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,10.636363636363637,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 70mm: F10.6″],[79,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,10.90909090909091,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 79mm: F10.9″],[81,null,””,null,””,13.636363636363637,”Canon G3 X at 81mm: F13.6″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[84,10.363636363636363,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 84mm: F10.4″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[91,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,11.181818181818182,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 91mm: F11.2″],[100,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,10.90909090909091,”Sony RX10 III at 100mm: F10.9″,null,””],[102,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,11.454545454545457,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 102mm: F11.5″],[105,10.636363636363637,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 105mm: F10.6″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[144,null,””,null,””,null,””,15.818181818181818,”Panasonic ZS100 at 144mm: F15.8″,null,””,null,””],[151,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,11.727272727272728,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 151mm: F11.7″],[157,null,””,null,””,null,””,16.090909090909093,”Panasonic ZS100 at 157mm: F16.1″,null,””,null,””],[163,null,””,null,””,15.272727272727273,”Canon G3 X at 163mm: F15.3″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[170,10.90909090909091,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 170mm: F10.9″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[200,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Sony RX10 II at 200mm: F7.6″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[208,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,12.000000000000002,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 208mm: F12.0″],[250,null,””,null,””,null,””,16.090909090909093,”Panasonic ZS100 at 250mm: F16.1″,null,””,null,””],[262,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,12.272727272727273,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 262mm: F12.3″],[400,10.90909090909091,”Panasonic FZ1000 at 400mm: F10.9″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[480,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,12.272727272727273,”Panasonic FZ2500 at 480mm: F12.3″],[600,null,””,null,””,15.272727272727273,”Canon G3 X at 600mm: F15.3″,null,””,10.90909090909091,”Sony RX10 III at 600mm: F10.9″,null,””]])

With its F2.8 constant aperture lens, the Sony Cyber-shot RX10 I & II capture more total light and offer more control over depth-of-field compared to its peers, by 1 or 2 stops. The trade-off is that its focal length caps out at 200mm equiv. The Canon PowerShot G3 X and Sony RX10 III have the longest lenses, with the latter being about 2/3-stop faster once hitting around 100mm. The Panasonic FZ2500 splits the difference between the G3 X and RX10 III.

And with that out of the way, let’s get right into exploring the enthusiast long zoom cameras!

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras

24 Apr

The enthusiast compact market has exploded over the last couple of years, with several manufacturers offering a product with 1″-type sensors. Most of these cameras are small (and sometimes pocketable) and feature fast (but short) lenses. They also vary in terms of design, control points, video specs and whether they have an EVF, so you’ll have some decisions to make. In this roundup, we’ll try to help.

Here are the cameras that we’ll be covering in this article:

  • Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II
  • Canon PowerShot G5 X
  • Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II
  • Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100/TZ100
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 IV
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V

As mentioned above, the majority of offerings in this category utilize 1″-type sensor, however two cameras offer even larger sensors. The Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II is built around the largest sensor of the bunch at 1.5″-type, while the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 uses most of the area of a slightly smaller Four Thirds chip.

Sensor size tends to be a major indicator of potential – particularly low light – image quality. Also, cameras with larger sensors will generally allow for much more control over depth of field.

LensEquivalentApertures([“Equivalent focal length (mm)”,”Sony RX100″,”Canon G1 X II”,”Sony RX100 III”,”Panasonic LX100″,”Panasonic ZS100″,”Canon G7 X II”,”Panasonic LX10″,”Canon G9 X II”], [[24,null,””,3.84,”Canon G1 X II at 24mm: F3.8″,4.90909090909091,”Sony RX100 III at 24mm: F4.9″,3.7434,”Panasonic LX100 at 24mm: F3.7″,null,””,4.90909090909091,”Canon G7 X II at 24mm: F4.9″,3.8181818181818183,”Panasonic LX10 at 24mm: F3.8″,null,””],[25,null,””,4.224,”Canon G1 X II at 25mm: F4.2″,5.454545454545455,”Sony RX100 III at 25mm: F5.5″,3.9636,”Panasonic LX100 at 25mm: F4.0″,7.6363636363636367,”Panasonic ZS100 at 25mm: F7.6″,null,””,4.0909090909090917,”Panasonic LX10 at 25mm: F4.1″,null,””],[26,null,””,4.8,”Canon G1 X II at 26mm: F4.8″,6.0000000000000009,”Sony RX100 III at 26mm: F6.0″,4.1838,”Panasonic LX100 at 26mm: F4.2″,7.9090909090909092,”Panasonic ZS100 at 26mm: F7.9″,null,””,4.90909090909091,”Panasonic LX10 at 26mm: F4.9″,null,””],[27,null,””,5.3759999999999994,”Canon G1 X II at 27mm: F5.4″,null,””,4.404,”Panasonic LX100 at 27mm: F4.4″,8.1818181818181834,”Panasonic ZS100 at 27mm: F8.2″,null,””,5.454545454545455,”Panasonic LX10 at 27mm: F5.5″,null,””],[28,4.90909090909091,”Sony RX100 at 28mm: F4.9″,null,””,6.8181818181818183,”Sony RX100 III at 28mm: F6.8″,4.6242,”Panasonic LX100 at 28mm: F4.6″,null,””,null,””,6.0000000000000009,”Panasonic LX10 at 28mm: F6.0″,5.454545454545455,”Canon G9 X II at 28mm: F5.5″],[29,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,6.8181818181818183,”Panasonic LX10 at 29mm: F6.8″,null,””],[30,null,””,6.144,”Canon G1 X II at 30mm: F6.1″,null,””,4.8444,”Panasonic LX100 at 30mm: F4.8″,8.7272727272727284,”Panasonic ZS100 at 30mm: F8.7″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[31,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Panasonic LX10 at 31mm: F7.6″,6.8181818181818183,”Canon G9 X II at 31mm: F6.8″],[32,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Sony RX100 III at 32mm: F7.6″,null,””,9.0,”Panasonic ZS100 at 32mm: F9.0″,6.0000000000000009,”Canon G7 X II at 32mm: F6.0″,null,””,null,””],[33,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Canon G9 X II at 33mm: F7.6″],[34,7.6363636363636367,”Sony RX100 at 34mm: F7.6″,null,””,null,””,5.0645999999999995,”Panasonic LX100 at 34mm: F5.1″,9.2727272727272734,”Panasonic ZS100 at 34mm: F9.3″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[36,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,9.5454545454545467,”Panasonic ZS100 at 36mm: F9.5″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[37,null,””,null,””,null,””,5.2848,”Panasonic LX100 at 37mm: F5.3″,null,””,null,””,null,””,8.7272727272727284,”Canon G9 X II at 37mm: F8.7″],[39,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,6.8181818181818183,”Canon G7 X II at 39mm: F6.8″,null,””,9.5454545454545467,”Canon G9 X II at 39mm: F9.5″],[40,null,””,6.72,”Canon G1 X II at 40mm: F6.7″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[41,null,””,null,””,null,””,5.505,”Panasonic LX100 at 41mm: F5.5″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[43,8.7272727272727284,”Sony RX100 at 43mm: F8.7″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[44,null,””,null,””,null,””,5.7252,”Panasonic LX100 at 44mm: F5.7″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[46,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,10.90909090909091,”Canon G9 X II at 46mm: F10.9″],[52,null,””,null,””,null,””,6.1655999999999995,”Panasonic LX100 at 52mm: F6.2″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[53,9.5454545454545467,”Sony RX100 at 53mm: F9.5″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,12.272727272727273,”Canon G9 X II at 53mm: F12.3″],[54,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Canon G7 X II at 54mm: F7.6″,null,””,null,””],[65,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,13.363636363636365,”Canon G9 X II at 65mm: F13.4″],[66,10.90909090909091,”Sony RX100 at 66mm: F10.9″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[70,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Sony RX100 III at 70mm: F7.6″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[72,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Panasonic LX10 at 72mm: F7.6″,null,””],[75,null,””,7.4879999999999995,”Canon G1 X II at 75mm: F7.5″,null,””,6.1655999999999995,”Panasonic LX100 at 75mm: F6.2″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[81,12.272727272727273,”Sony RX100 at 81mm: F12.3″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[84,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,13.363636363636365,”Canon G9 X II at 84mm: F13.4″],[94,13.363636363636365,”Sony RX100 at 94mm: F13.4″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[100,13.363636363636365,”Sony RX100 at 100mm: F13.4″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,7.6363636363636367,”Canon G7 X II at 100mm: F7.6″,null,””,null,””],[120,null,””,7.4879999999999995,”Canon G1 X II at 120mm: F7.5″,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””],[144,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,15.818181818181818,”Panasonic ZS100 at 144mm: F15.8″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[157,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,16.090909090909093,”Panasonic ZS100 at 157mm: F16.1″,null,””,null,””,null,””],[250,null,””,null,””,null,””,null,””,16.090909090909093,”Panasonic ZS100 at 250mm: F16.1″,null,””,null,””,null,””]])

To further help you pick the right camera in this class, we’ve also created the chart below, which breaks down the equivalent aperture for each camera, as you work your way through the zoom range. Our article here explains the concept of equivalence, but at a high level all you need to know is that the lower the line is on the graph below, the blurrier the backgrounds you’ll be able to get and typically, though not always, the better the overall low-light performance.

The camera that stays the ‘fastest’ longest is the Panasonic LX100, due both to its F1.7-2.8 lens and Four Thirds sensor (which it uses a crop of). A number of cameras sit in the middle, including the Canon G1 X II and G7 X II as well as the Sony RX100 I/II. The Panasonic ZS100 is the slowest of the bunch, but it also has the longest reach by a decent margin.

On the following pages, you’ll find what we liked and didn’t like about each camera, links to our test scenes for image quality comparisons, and real-world galleries to give you a sense of how each performs outside the lab. Given that there are five Sony RX100s in this comparison, you might find this article helpful in making a decision between those. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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A Passion for Wrecks and Images Give a Photography Enthusiast a Second Career

21 Apr

photography-wrecks

Image: Pongsatorn Sukhum

Pongsatorn Sukhum was on his way to becoming a professional photographer. A long-time camera enthusiast, he took a year off college while studying in the UK to work in a studio that shot advertising photography. He then moved into editorial photography, shooting for travel magazines and building up a collection of underwater stock images that combined his love of photography with his passion for Scuba diving. In the mid-nineties, his work was shown in a group exhibition in his native Thailand. Today, Pongsatorn runs an engineering business in Bangkok but his continued work in underwater photography, and in particular, his images of World War II wrecks off the coast of Thailand are an example of how talented enthusiasts can keep their professions while maintaining their passion for image-making and even contributing to the preservation of the subjects they love to shoot.

Pongsatorn now produces fine art prints of his photography which he sells through his website. But publications call him whenever they need images to complement their editorials on wrecks in the region and he is still commissioned occasionally for advertising work. If he’s not working on an engineering project, he’ll dive one or two weekends each month and when he’s not on the water, he’ll find time each week to process images and research ships.

Artistry Meets Expertise

That demand for professional imagery from a photographer who only works in the profession part-time continues for a couple of reasons. The quality of Pongsatorn’s photographs is certainly one factor. Pongsatorn may not be a full-time photographer but his images are professional quality. He shoots in black and white to convey the sense of being in an environment in which color has been stripped away by the water, and to convey the mood at the depths where the ships rest.

“I feel that the characteristics of high-speed b/w film faithfully capture the light and ambiance at these great depths,” he told us by email. “I also believe that entering the water loaded with b/w film is a mindset.”

The result is a collection of atmospheric shots in which the fragility and graceful lines of the diver are set against the solidity of a slowly decaying steel hulk placed in front of a backdrop of silty grays.

But the continued demand among buyers for Pongsatorn’s skills can also be put down to his expertise. Underwater photography is demanding. Photographers have to be skilled in diving as well as in image-making. They need to understand their equipment and the environment as well as the subject of the shoot.

“Underwater, we can’t change lenses, add filters, or replace batteries so advanced planning is required,” says Pongsatorn. “Familiarity with the layout of the wreck is crucial to avoid delays associated with orientation.”

Pongsatorn keeps a collection of construction blueprints related to the wreck he’s about to shoot, as well as sketches that he updates regularly. Before the dive, those plans are transferred to a waterproof slate for use underwater so that he’s not trying to communicate a new idea to a co-diver or assistant while they’re swimming. The choice of shots, too, poses a range of different problems. Wide angle images mean keeping other divers and their bubbles away from the scene long enough for Pongsatorn to get his shots. That’s not usually an issue when shooting wrecks that aren’t popular dive sites but for well-known locations, Pongsatorn usually pleads for a ten-minute head start. Before some shoots, he’s even asked the Thai Navy to cordon off a wreck for a day.

While underwater photographers don’t have the same daylight worries as landscape photographers, they do have to cope with other challenges. Weather conditions can restrict accessibility to remote sites to certain times of the year, and sediment raised by the actions of a swimming photographer can reduce visibility.

“This happens frequently as the wrecks are naturally on the sea bed (with the exception of the so-called vertical wreck) where there is a great deal of sediment just waiting to be disturbed,” says Pongsatorn. “Diver buoyancy control and proper finning techniques need to be practiced.”

Learn How to Fin

Often, the constraints of time and the limitations of depth mean that Pongsatorn can only make one or two dives to a low-lying wreck on any given day. Some dive profiles, he says, are so deep that he’ll only be able to stay at the site for as little as five minutes.

“As you can imagine, deep wreck photography is a very low-yield activity. However, these challenges make it exciting and create opportunities for some truly creative work.”

For other photographers looking to specialize in underwater photography, Pongsatorn notes that while no official training is required, there are numerous basic courses and workshops available that will explain how light behaves underwater and how to set up and look after equipment. Photographers who happen to live in tropical areas can start by photographing clown fish, he recommends, as they’re easy to find and tend to stay in one place. Once they’ve mastered finning and have control over their stability, photographers can pick a subject and study its behavior.

Most important though is to respect the environment in which you’re shooting. On his blog, Pongsatorn has highlighted campaigns for shark preservation and attacked dive operators who remove artifacts from the wrecks they visit.

“There are several operators who specifically set out to loot. It’s in their literature. They abuse the legal loopholes and lack of enforcement. It’s sad to see all these artifacts being hauled up day after day. These people need to be educated.”

Similarly, divers who venture into a wreck exhale bubbles which can get trapped below decks and under bulkheads. In time, these air pockets corrode the metal and exert an upward pressure on the metal plates, causing them to collapse, Pongsatorn warns.

It’s that kind of knowledge and that level of concern that combines with creativity and artistry to produce images that are attractive to buyers — both of art prints and for commercial use. Find a subject for which you feel passionate enough to want to study and understand completely, bring to it your photography skills, and you also won’t need to give up the day job to earn money from your photography.


Photopreneur – Make Money Selling Your Photos

 
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Have your say: Best enthusiast / professional ILC of 2016

08 Dec

Have your say: Best enthusiast / Professional ILC of 2016

2016 was pretty good for high-end ILCs, as we’d expect from a Photokina year. The world’s largest photography trade-show is held on every even-numbered year, in September, and this year’s show saw major announcements from several manufacturers. But we also saw several high-end ILCs released earlier in 2016, including flagships from Canon and Nikon.

In this poll, you’ll get the opportunity to vote for your choice of the best enthusiast / professional ILCs released this year. For the sake of a manageable selection, we’ve drawn a line here between enthusiast and professional and enty-level / midrange, so the chances are that if your favorite camera isn’t listed in this article, it can be found here.

You’ll find the poll embedded in the final page of this slideshow, but for now, click through to read more about this year’s crop of enthusiast and professional ILCs.

Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark II is a thing of beauty, but it’s built for hard work. In addition to its new 20.2 megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor and Dual DIGIC 6+ Image Processors, the Mark II includes a 61-point High-Density Reticular AF II system and a 360,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor with enhanced precision and performance compared to its predecessor, improving facial recognition and tracking, as well as nature scenes.

The camera also boasts excellent dynamic range and reduced color noise compared to its predecessor throughout its standard ISO speed range of 100 – 51,200. The EOS-1D X Mark II camera offers high resolution DCI 4K video at frame rates up-to-60p, and full HD video at frame rates up to 120p.

All of this adds up to a highly impressive camera. We rate it extremely highly, but what do you think? Cast your vote and let us know. 

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

Canon’s EOS 5D-series is one of those long-established series of cameras that it’s hard to get too excited about, simply because they’ve always been very solid, very reliable, very good products. The latest in the series, the EOS 5D IV is the best yet.

Featuring an all-new 30MP CMOS sensor, DIGIC 6+ processor, Dual Pixel AF system and 4K video capture, the 5D IV offers a fully expanded ISO range of 50-102400 and includes ‘Dual Pixel’ AF, allowing for responsive face detection and focusing in live view and movie mode. When shooting with the viewfinder you can take advantage of a 61-point AF system (41 of which are cross-type) with expanded vertical coverage.

What do you think of the EOS 5D Mark IV? Head to the end of this slideshow and cast your vote. 

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Fujifilm X-Pro2

The Fujifilm X-Pro2 is the long-awaited update to the original X-series ILC, the venerable X-Pro1. As well as slightly tweaked ergonomics it offers a new 24.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor and an ‘advanced hybrid multi viewfinder’ that can be an optical or electronic viewfinder, or a combination of the two.

The X-Pro 2’s new image processor is 4x faster than that of its predecessor and offers a maximum ISO sensitivity of 51,200. The autofocus system has been updated substantially, now offering 273 total AF points of which 77 are phase detection (covering 40% of the frame), and much faster performance.

Are you in love with the X-Pro 2’s high performance and classic styling? Cast your vote and let us know.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Fujifilm X-T2

We really like the X-T1, and with the X-T2, Fujifilm improved an already very nice camera even further. The X-T2 is Fujifilm’s latest enthusiast SLR-style mirrorless ILC, and one of two X-series flagships – the other being the X-Pro 2. The X-T2 features a 24MP X-Trans CMOS III sensor and the company’s latest image processor (X-Processor Pro). The rugged magnesium alloy body is sealed against dust and moisture and has a unique articulating LCD as well as a large, high resolution EVF.

The AF system has been greatly improved compared to the X-T1 and had 325 total focus points, 169 of which are phase-detect, as well as a higher readout speed. The addition of 4K video (and good 4K video, at that) rounds up an impressive spec sheet, and makes the X-T2 one of our favorite cameras of the past year. Is it one of yours? 

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Nikon D500

They said it was a myth. They said it was impossible. They said we were fools for hoping for a D300S replacement after almost seven years, but 2016 was the year that Nikon granted the wishes of a great many of its loyal users and released the D500. 

The 20MP D500 is Nikon’s flagship APS-C format DSLR. With continuous shooting speeds of 10 fps and a 200 shot buffer for Raw images, the camera is aimed squarely at action and fast-paced photographers who don’t mind the smaller sensor, or who might even benefit from its extra reach. It features the same 153-point AF system and 180k-pixel RGB metering sensor of the professional full-frame D5, along with the same EXPEED 5 processor. It can also capture 4K/UHD video.

Since it was released, the D500 has become one of our favorite sub full-frame DSLRs ever. Were you one of those people who were waiting years for it to appear? Cast your vote and let us know. 

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Nikon D5

The D5 is a professional full-frame DSLR with ‘Nikon’ on the front of it. That means it’s fast, has a battery life you can measure in thousands of frames, and has a world-beating AF system. The D5 is a significant upgrade to the D4S, and sets new standards in terms of autofocus, thanks to a new 153-point AF system with an almost uncanny ability to track moving subjects. Less impressive is the D5’s slightly half-baked 4K video mode, but for Nikon shooters who need to get stills in tough conditions, the 20MP D5 is as good as it gets. 

Most of us mere mortals could never justify buying one, but is the D5 impressive enough to be one of your favorite cameras of 2016?

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

Don’t be fooled by its small sensor – the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II is a powerhouse. Featuring a newly designed 20.4MP MOS sensor and TruePic VIII engine, the E-M1 II is capable burst rates of 60 fps in Single AF and an incredible 18 fps with C-AF. The new Dual FAST autofocus system combines contrast detection with 121 on-chip phase-detect points.

The E-M1 II has in-body 5-axis image stabilization which reduces shake by up to 5.5 stops. Its body is weather-sealed and features a large electronic viewfinder, 3″ LCD fully articulating touchscreen and dual memory card slots. The camera can capture both UHD and DCI 4K at 30p and 24p respectively, at bit rates of up to 237Mbps.

We continue to be impressed by the performance of the OM-D E-M1 II, but is it one of your standout cameras of 2016? Vote now and let us know.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Pentax K-1

Something of a white whale for many long-time Pentax fans, Pentax’s long-awaited full-frame DSLR finally became real in 2016. The first 35mm format Pentax-branded DSLR (the first to make it to market, anyway), the K-1 offers a 36.4MP CMOS sensor, 5-axis sensor-shift image stabilization, a ‘nearly 100%’ optical viewfinder and 33-point AF system with 25 cross-type points.

The 3.2″ 1.04M-dot LCD uses a new flexible tilting design which allows for horizontal, vertical and diagonal movement while keeping the screen in alignment with the lens axis. Designed with the needs of landscape photographers in mind, what the K-1 lacks in speed and autofocus performance it makes up for with tough construction and well thought-out ergonomics. We love it, but is it one of your favorite cameras of 2016? Let us know.  

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sony Alpha a99 II

The Sony Alpha a99 II was a bit of a surprise when it was announced, but proves that there’s life left in Sony’s A-Mount system yet. And it’s pretty impressive – the a99 II features a full-frame 42MP BSI CMOS sensor, Hybrid AF system with 399 contrast detect and 79 cross-type hybrid points. The camera can shoot at 12 fps with continuous autofocus and 8 fps with live view. It can capture 4K video (UHD or Super 35) using the XAVC S codec with bit rates of up to 100Mbps. The a99 II also offers both S-Log2 and S-Log3 gammas and can output 4:2:2 4K video over its HDMI port.

The rugged body is weather-sealed and has built-in 5-axis image stabilization. Are these features enough to put the a99 II on your list of best high-end cameras of 2016?

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony’s flagship APS-C camera gains five-axis image stabilization and touchscreen operation compared to its predecessor. A larger buffer and more processing power also help set it apart from the older a6300. In most other respects it is identical, and includes the same still image quality and 4K video features as the a6300, and the same 425 on-sensor PDAF system.

The a6500 might not feel like an entirely ‘new’ product, but it’s one of the best-performing products of its type on the market. Is it one of your favorite cameras of 2016? Cast your vote and let us know.

See full specifications, user reviews and more

Vote now!

Voting is easy – you pick your favorite products by dragging and dropping. You can pick up to three, and rank them in order of priority.


Have your say

$ (document).ready(function() { Poll({“pollId”:”2073471655″,”openForVoting”:true,”mainElementId”:”poll0″,”slot”:null,”isSingleChoicePoll”:false,”minNumberOfChoices”:1,”maxNumberOfChoices”:3}); })

Have your say: Best enthusiast / professional ILC of 2016
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Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

Fujifilm X-Pro2

Fujifilm X-T2

Nikon D500

Nikon D5

Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

Pentax K-1

Sony a99 II

Sony a6500

Voting is easy – you pick your favorite products by dragging and dropping. You can pick up to three, and rank them in order of priority.

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  2. It’s fine to vote for the Pentax K-1 products that you haven’t used (some aren’t yet shipping, after all) but please don’t vote for the K-1 purely just to sandbag another product or brand. I.e., please don’t be a troll.
  3. Please only vote once, from a single account. Creating and voting from multiple accounts for a community poll of no consequence is a silly thing to do with your time. See points 1 and 2, above, about not being a troll.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Canon EOS M5 elevates enthusiast appeal with 24MP Dual Pixel AF sensor and built-in EVF

15 Sep

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The Canon EOS M5 takes the company’s mirrorless line a big step forward with a 24.2MP CMOS sensor using Dual Pixel technology, a DIGIC 7 image processor and a built-in 2.36M-dot EVF. It jumps ahead of the M3 as the most enthusiast-focused camera in the lineup with added control points, burst shooting at 7fps and 1080/60p video that combines in-lens and digital IS for 5-axis stabilization for movie recording.

The M5’s 3.” 1.62M-dot touchscreen tilts up by 85° and downward by 180°, and supports touch-focusing even when using the EVF. Wi-Fi and NFC are offered along with low energy Bluetooth that provides a continuous connection. 

The Canon EOS M5 will go on sale in November 2016. It will sell for $ 979 body-only, with the EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM for $ 1099 or with the just-announced EF-M 18-150mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM for $ 1479 (that kit goes on sale in December). 

Read our Canon EOS M5 First Impressions Review

Press release

CANON U.S.A INTRODUCES THE LATEST MEMBERS OF THE EOS FAMILY THE EOS M5 DIGITAL CAMERA AND ITS FIRST EF-M HIGH POWER ZOOM LENS

EOS M5 Camera Provides The Fastest Autofocus (AF) speed of EOS M-Series and a built-in Electronic Viewfinder

MELVILLE, N.Y., September 15, 2016 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the latest additions to its EOS M series system – the new Canon EOS M5 Interchangeable Lens Digital Camera and compact EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens. The EOS M5 camera features a 24.2 Megapixel APS-C sized CMOS sensor, DIGIC 7 Image Processor and the fastest AF speed in the EOS M-series , enabling photographers to capture clear, sharp, high-resolution images and Full HD videos. It is also the first in the EOS camera line to include the low energy Bluetooth® Smart feature that can maintain a constant connection with your compatible smartphone or tablet when you use the Canon camera connect application and both applications are active. The versatile EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens is compatible with all Canon EOS M series digital cameras, and is a great option for photographers looking to capture scenic landscapes while traveling to close-up shots from afar.

“The new capabilities found in the Canon EOS M5 Camera and EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens set a new standard for our EOS M series of cameras and lenses, showing that Canon is constantly incorporating performance enhancements desired by our customers,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “When paired together, the new EOS M5 camera and EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens provide image-makers of all levels with powerful tools that enable them to capture a variety of remarkable images and videos.”

In addition, advanced photographers will appreciate the improved operability of the EOS M5 camera. It has a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF) and Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF for capturing stills and shooting video with smooth and precise autofocus. This allows for Touch and Drag AF so users can easily switch the subject of their focus by dragging the AF frame directly on the LCD panel, even while looking through the camera’s EVF. Focus peaking allows users to highlight the area of the image that is in focus from within the EVF or LCD monitor. In addition to its touchscreen operability, the EOS M5 camera also has easily accessible dials that allow you to quickly adjust your settings on-the-go.

Key Features of the Canon EOS M5 Camera Include:

  • 24.2 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor, ISO 100–25600.
  • Fast and smooth Dual Pixel CMOS AF helps you capture stills and shoot video with quick and precise autofocus.
  • High-speed continuous shooting at up to 7.0 fps (up to 9.0 fps with AF Lock) and new DIGIC 7 Image Processor with improved AF tracking performance.
  • Full HD 60p helps capture fast-moving subjects and brilliant results in MP4 format.
  • Digital IS with 5-axis image stabilization when shooting movies plus increased image stabilization with both lens optical IS and in-camera digital IS when shooting with an IS lens.
  • Built-in high-resolution EVF (approx. 2,360,000 dots) with new Touch and Drag AF lets you manually move the AF frame displayed for more precise focusing in different shooting situations.
  • Intuitive touch screen 3.2 tilt-type (85° up/180° down) LCD monitor (approx. 1,620,000 dots) enables flexible positioning and clear viewing.
  • Easily customize functions while shooting using the Main Dial, Quick Control Dial, Dial Function Button and Exposure Compensation Dial.
  • Built-in Wi-Fi® and NFC allows for easy sharing and transferring of images and videos.
  • Equipped with Bluetooth®iii Smart for smooth pairing with a compatible smartphone by powering on both devices for easy photo sharing and remote control possibilities.
  • Shorter camera startup time and interval time between each image capture for a more efficient shooting experience.
  • Compatible with EF-M lenses as well as the full line of EF and EF-Sviii lenses and Speedlites for expanded creativity.

The Canon EOS M5 also features Combination IS with in-camera 5-axis image stabilization, while capturing video, a first in the Canon EOS series. With a compatible lens attachediv, Combination IS leverages optical IS and in-camera digital IS to help create tremendously smooth videos. The DIGIC 7 Image Processor makes the 5-axis IS possible even with lenses that do not contain IS, because the in-camera image stabilization functions independently to help reduce camera shake when shooting videos.

Additionally, the EOS M5 camera shoots impressive time-lapse videos. The EOS M5 camera also allows for easy panning by setting the optimal shutter speed after analyzing the camera’s panning speed and how fast the subject is moving.

The new Canon EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens offers a high-zoom ratio, expanding the range of photographic possibilities for EOS M digital cameras. Its image stabilizer helps with reducing image blur and making image and video shooting easier at longer focal lengths. Along with the enhanced performance, the EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens is compact and lightweight, making it a versatile and convenient lens to carry.

Key Features of the Canon EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM Lens Include:

  • Canon’s first EF-M high-zoom power lens covering a broad range of shooting scenes with a high-zoom ratio of up to 8.3x (29–240mm equivalent).
  • Compact and lightweight design allows for easy portability.
  • Optical design helps provide excellent image quality across a broad zoom range comparable to the EF-S 18–135mm f/3.5–5.6 IS USM lens.
  • Maximum magnification of 0.31x at focal length 150mm.
  • Image Stabilizer effect at up to 4 stops of shake correction helps capture sharp images.

Pricing and Availability

The new Canon EOS M5 camera is scheduled to be available through authorized Canon dealers or through the Canon Online store at http://shop.usa.canon.com/ in November 2016, for an estimated retail price of $ 979.99 for the body only. It will also be sold as part of body-and-lens kits with EF-M 15-45mm/F3.5-6.3 IS STM zoom kit lens (estimated retail price of $ 1,099.00, scheduled to be available early November 2016 ), and with the new EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens for an (estimated retail price of $ 1,479.00x, scheduled to be available early December 2016x)

In addition, the new Canon EF-M 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens, available in graphite and silver colors, is scheduled to be available in December 2016 for an estimated retail price of $ 499.99x.

Additional optional EOS accessories include a Body Jacket (EM-E2) and Neck Strap (EH29-CJ) that come in black or brown. For more information please visit: http://mseriescameras.usa.canon.com

Canon EOS M5 specifications

Price
MSRP $ 979 (body), $ 1099 (w/15-45mm lens), $ 1479 (w/15-150mm lens)
Body type
Body type SLR-style mirrorless
Body material Metal
Sensor
Max resolution 6000 x 4000
Other resolutions 3:2 (6000 x 3368, 3984 x 2656, 2976 x 1984, 2400 x 1600), 16:9 (6000 x 3368, 3984 x 2240, 2976 x 1680, 2400 x 1344), 4:3 (5328 x 4000, 3552 x 2664, 2656 x 1992, 2112 x 1600), 1:1 (4000 x 4000, 2656 x 2656, 1984 x 1984, 1600 x 1600)
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 24 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 26 megapixels
Sensor size APS-C (22.3 x 14.9 mm)
Sensor type CMOS
Processor Digic 7
Color space sRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
ISO Auto, 100-25600
White balance presets 6
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization No
Image stabilization notes 5-axis for video only
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, standard
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
  • Raw (Canon CR2, 14-bit)
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Manual focus Yes
Number of focus points 49
Lens mount Canon EF-M
Focal length multiplier 1.6×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3.2
Screen dots 1,620,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic
Viewfinder coverage 100%
Viewfinder resolution 2,360,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
Built-in flash Yes
Flash range 5.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flash Yes
Flash X sync speed 1/200 sec
Continuous drive 9.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs, custom, remote)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Partial
Exposure compensation ±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing ±2 (3 frames at 1/3 EV steps)
WB Bracketing No
Videography features
Modes
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p / 35 Mbps, MP4, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p / 24 Mbps, MP4, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 24p / 24 Mbps, MP4, H.264, AAC
  • 1280 x 720 @ 60p / 16 Mbps, MP4, H.264, AAC
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC card
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11/b/g/n with Bluetooth and NFC
Remote control Yes (Via smartphone or wireless remote)
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description LP-E17 lithium-ion battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 295
Weight (inc. batteries) 427 g (0.94 lb / 15.06 oz)
Dimensions 116 x 89 x 61 mm (4.57 x 3.5 x 2.4)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
GPS None

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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2016 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Cameras

03 May

While most of new 1″ sensor enthusiast cameras have been on the shorter end of the focal length spectrum, there are now quite a few long zoom models, as well. Whether you want something pocketable or want to shoot for the moon (pun intended), you’ll find it in this group.

There are plenty of other long zoom compacts out there, some offering focal ranges reaching 2000mm though they almost always use much smaller 1/2.3″ sensors (the Olympus Stylus 1s is one exception). The cameras in this roundup eclipse those models, especially when it comes to image quality and control over depth-of-field.

The models we’re looking at in this article include:

  • Canon PowerShot G3 X
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100/TZ100
  • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10
  • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II
  • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 III (coming soon)

The cameras that have the shortest zoom are arguably the most robust, feature-wise: the Sony Cyber-shot RX10 twins. (The RX10 Mark III, which will cover soon, has a significantly longer lens.) The Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100/TZ100 is likely the best travel zoom ever, offering a good balance of size and zoom power, while the Canon PowerShot G3 X and Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 swing for the fences in terms of zoom power.

To further help you pick the right camera in this class, we’ve created the chart below, which breaks down the equivalent aperture for each camera, as you work your way through the zoom range. Our article here explains the concept of equivalence, but at a high level all you need to know is that the lower the line is on the graph below, the blurrier the backgrounds you’ll be able to get and typically, though not always, the better the overall low-light performance.

This graph plots equivalent focal length against equivalent aperture – with both axes taking sensor size into account so that they can be compared on a common basis. Equivalent focal lengths offer the same field-of-view and equivalent apertures give the same depth-of-field and similar total light capture. For more information, click here.

With its constant aperture (F2.8) lens, the Sony Cyber-shot RX10 I/II capture more total light and offers more control over depth-of-field compared to its peers, by 1 or 2 stops. The trade-off is that its focal length caps out at 200mm equiv. The Canon PowerShot G3 X has the longest lens, but it reaches its maximum aperture (F5.6) at around 200mm equiv., putting it 1 stop behind the Panasonic Lumix FZ1000, which tops out at F4.

And with that out of the way, let’s get right into exploring the enthusiast long zoom cameras!

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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2016 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras

29 Apr

The enthusiast compact market has exploded over the last couple of years, with almost every manufacturer offering a product with a 1″-type sensors. Most of those cameras are small (and sometimes pocketable) and feature fast (but short) lenses. They also vary in terms of design, control points, video specs and whether they have an EVF, so you’ll have some decisions to make. In this roundup, we’ll try to help.

Here are the cameras that we’ll be covering in this article:

  • Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II
  • Canon PowerShot G5 X
  • Canon PowerShot G7 X
  • Canon PowerShot G9 X
  • Fujifilm X30
  • Fujifilm XQ2
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100/TZ100
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 IV

As mentioned above, the majority of offerings in this category utilize 1″-type sensor, however two cameras offer even larger sensors. The Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II is built around the largest sensor of the bunch at 1.5″, while the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 uses a slightly smaller Micro Four Thirds chip.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the two Fujifilm options use significantly smaller 2/3″ sensors, which is important, because sensor size can be a major indicator of potential – particularly lowlight – image quality. Also, cameras with larger sensors will generally allow for much more control over depth of field.

To further help you pick the right camera in this class, we’ve also created the chart below, which breaks down the equivalent aperture for each camera, as you work your way through the zoom range. Our article here explains the concept of equivalence, but at a high level all you need to know is that the lower the line is on the graph below, the blurrier the backgrounds you’ll be able to get and typically, though not always, the better the overall low-light performance.

This graph plots equivalent focal length against equivalent aperture – with both axes taking sensor size into account so that they can be compared on a common basis. Equivalent focal lengths offer the same field-of-view and equivalent apertures give the same depth-of-field and similar total light capture. For more information, click here.

On the following pages, you’ll find what we liked and didn’t like about each camera, links to our test scenes for image quality comparisons, and real-world galleries to give you a sense of how each performs outside the lab.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Opinion: Enthusiast compacts have finally come of age

28 Feb

Last December I was looking to buy a camera for my mom to replace her aging Panasonic travel zoom. It didn’t take very good photos but, to be fair, you can’t expect miracles from a 30x zoom camera with a 1/2.3″ sensor. She listed a couple of must-haves: it should fit in a purse, have a decent amount of zoom and have photo quality that was better than what she had now. She didn’t want to deal with changing lenses and my dad wanted it to have a viewfinder, if possible.

Being somewhat knowledgeable in the digital camera field I knew that I needed to look at the 1″-type camera market first. Back in mid-December I had just a few options: the Canon PowerShot G3 X / G5 X / G7 X / G9 X, the Panasonic FZ1000 and the Sony RX100 and RX10 series. While quite a few of those cameras passed the ‘purse test’, none had focal lengths longer than 100mm equiv. For real zoom power there was only the Canon G3 X, Panasonic FZ1000 and Sony RX10, all of which were far, far too large. 

The RX100 III and IV meet the size and EVF requirements but are just too limited in terms of zoom. The Panasonic FZ1000 is my favorite enthusiast superzoom but is way too large for a purse.

Plan B was to find something in the middle: a slightly smaller sensor that had decent zoom, and my choice was Olympus’ Stylus 1s. It has solid image quality, well-designed controls, and a 10X zoom, making me think that I found just what I’d been looking for. Shortly after it arrived I did a quick FaceTime chat with the future recipient who thought it was too large for a purse, and I agreed, so back it went.

At this point I felt as if I’d struck out. Anything with a decent zoom was just too darn big, and pocket cameras just wouldn’t cut it.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V ticked all of the boxes on my shopping list, except for one: image quality.

Not knowing what was coming out next (really!), I bit my tongue and bought a Sony Cyber-shot HX90V. It’s small, has a 30X zoom, a pop-up EVF (a la RX100 III/IV), flip-up LCD, and Wi-Fi. Sounds like the perfect gift, except for two rather important things. First, the sensor size is 1/2.3″, which is exactly what I was trying to avoid. Second, the lens is quite slow, with a maximum aperture range of F3.5-6.4. Thus, in low light, the camera will need to crank up the ISO, resulting in a big drop in image quality.

The hole in the market

What was missing in the 1″ sensor market was pretty obvious: something in-between the compact, short zooms and the giant superzooms. As anyone who has ever bought a piece of consumer electronics knows, your purchase is outdated as soon as it leaves the store. As luck would have it, the camera I’d been waiting for showed up on January 5th: the Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100.

The Panasonic ZS100/TZ100 finds a middle ground between small/short zoom and huge/long zoom.

The ZS100 (known as the TZ100 in most countries) ticked nearly every box on my list. It’s compact, has a reasonable amount of zoom (10X, 25-250mm equiv.), and an EVF (though it’s not a great one). Seeing how it uses the same sensor as the FZ1000, photo quality and 4K video should both be very good. The only downside I can find is that the lens, with a maximum aperture range of F2.8-5.9, is pretty slow. At least image quality should hold up when it has to increase the ISO sensitivity in low light. 

Unfortunately, the ZS100 wasn’t set to ship until mid-March, so my mom was out of luck.

Where’s my wide-angle?

Still, there was one area of the 1″ camera market in which there was a void, and that was at the wide end. The Panasonic LX100 was really the only choice, but it’s considerably larger than what I was looking for.

The Nikon DL18-50 filled in the last gap in the 1″ enthusiast compact market with its 18-50mm equivalent lens.

Then, lo and behold, Nikon came running into the market with three new 1″ cameras (known as the DLs), which finally filled in that last gap. The camera that did so is the DL18-50 which, as its name implies, has an 18-50mm equivalent lens – easily the widest in this class. And it’s a fast one, with a maximum aperture range of F1.8-2.8. There are many other things going for it spec-wise; it has a 20.8MP sensor (likely from Nikon’s 1 J5 mirrorless camera), Hybrid AF system (the DL cameras are the only cameras in the 1″ category with this), tilting LCD, 4K video and a ‘SnapBridge’ Wi-Fi system that uses Bluetooth to maintain a constant connection with your phone. We haven’t tested it yet, but we’re really looking forward to it.

The two other DLs have the same guts, but have focal lengths that fit in with the competition. The DL24-85 slots in-between the Sony RX100 III/IV and Canon PowerShot G7 X I/II, while the DL24-500 is similar to the Canon G3 X and Panasonic FZ1000. 

Everyone wins

When I started my search for that Christmas gift, the enthusiast compact market was so limited that I ended up purchasing the very type of camera that I was trying to avoid in the first place. Had Christmas been postponed about four months, the ZS100 would’ve been in a box with “To Mom” on it. 

In the end, this year’s rapid growth in the enthusiast compact market didn’t help me personally. But there are now cameras for every situation, from wide-angle to super-telephoto. The enthusiast compact market has finally come of age, to the benefit of everyone. 

* The G7 X has since been replaced by a Mark II model which offers a faster processor, improved Raw shooting and battery life, and refined ergonomics.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Nikon covers all focal lengths with three ‘DL’ enthusiast compacts with 1″-type sensors

26 Feb

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Nikon is entering the 1″-type premium compact market in a big way, introducing three new models: the Nikon DL18-50, DL24-85 and DL-24-500. Between them, they cover pretty much every focal length. The ‘guts’ of all three ‘DL’ models are the same, in that they share a sensor, image processor, autofocus system and support for 4K video (with clean HDMI output, no less). Parts of the design, especially the control layout and font, strongly resemble that of Nikon’s 1-series mirrorless cameras.

Sensor-wise, the DLs use what is possibly the same 20.8MP 1″-type BSI CMOS sensor as Nikon’s J5 mirrorless camera. It’s paired with the company’s new EXPEED 6A image processor, which allows for a top ISO of 12800 and 4K/UHD video recording at 30p. All three cameras have ‘Dual Detect VR’, which combines data from the cameras’ angular velocity sensors and the scene itself to reduce shake. They also have fluorine coatings on their lenses to keep moisture and oil away. Each has a manual focus ring around the lens, as well.

They also have 3″ touch-enabled OLED displays, tilting on the 18-50 and 24-85 and fully articulating on the 24-500. Naturally, they all have Wi-Fi with NFC, plus Nikon’s ‘SnapBridge’ technology, which uses Bluetooth to maintain a connection between camera and phone, so there’s no need to re-pair. Battery life on all three DL models is rated at 290 shots/charge (per the CIPA standard).

One of the features that may set the DLs apart from the other 1″-type cameras is its Hybrid AF system, which combines 105 phase-detect with 171 contrast-detect points. This allows the camera to shoot at 20 fps with continuous autofocus, which is, by far, best-in-class (spec-wise). If you can live with single AF, then the DLs can shoot even faster: 60 fps.

Nikon DL18-50

The first camera is perhaps the most interesting, as it has the widest lens of any enthusiast compact on the market. That lens has an equivalent focal length of 18-50mm and a fast maximum aperture range of F1.8-2.8. The lens has a 3-stop ND filter and is Nikon’s first compact to have a Nano Crystal Coating, which reduces flare and ghosting. The lens has seven aperture blades and has a top shutter speed of 1/1600 sec (an electronic shutter, found on all three models, maxes out at 1/16000 sec). There is also built-in perspective correction, which is especially useful when shooting architecture.

The camera has full manual exposure control, Raw support, tilting touch OLED display and aforementioned 4K/30p support. The DL18-50 also supports an optional tilting OLED electronic viewfinder with 2.36M dots. The 18-50 is the only one of the camera cameras to lack a built-in flash, though like its siblings it does have a hot shoe.

Nikon DL24-85

The DL24-85 is very similar to its wider sibling, both inside and out. The main difference is its lens, which is a 24-85mm equiv. F1.8-2.8 model, though it lacks the Nano Crystal Coating. Its standout feature is the ability to take life-size, 1:1 macro photos, with a minimum focus distance of 3cm. Macro shooters can also take advantage of focus peaking and bracketing as well as manual priority AF. Again it includes a built-in ND filter.

Nikon DL24-500

For those seeking a long zoom model, there’s the DL24-500. As its name implies, it has a 24-500mm equiv. lens, with a max aperture range of F2.8-5.6. Unlike the other two models, the 24-500 has a fully articulating display and a built-in OLED viewfinder. It’s also the only of the DL models with a mic input jack, with support for Nikon’s ME-1 shotgun mic. 

All three cameras will be available in early summer with suggested retail prices of $ 649 (24-85), $ 849 (18-50), and $ 999 (24-500).

Press Release:

THE NIKON DL PREMIUM COMPACT SERIES: PUTTING POCKETABLE POWER AND LEGENDARY NIKKOR LENS PRECISION INTO THE HANDS OF PASSIONATE PHOTOGRAPHERS

Pairing a Large 1-Inch Sensor with Superior NIKKOR Lens Technology, Nikon’s New Compact DL24-85, DL18-50 and DL24-500 Will Help Capture Stunning Images and 4K UHD Video

MELVILLE, NY (Monday, February 22, 2016 at 11:01 P.M. EST) – Today, Nikon Inc. announced the new DL Series of premium compact cameras. These pocketable yet powerful imaging tools offer an elite level of imaging prowess that fits easily in one’s palm. Equipped with a variety of focal lengths optimized for different types of shooters, the DL24-85, DL18-50 and DL24-500 combine powerful NIKKOR optics with a large 20.8-megapixel (CX-format) 1-inch BSI CMOS sensor to produce stunning image quality and amazingly detailed images, even when shooting in low-light. Cameras in the new DL line will also feature powerful performance, with high-speed Autofocus (AF) and 20 frames-per-second (60 fps with fixed AF) continuous shooting capability for fast action moments, as well as 4K UHD video recording for users to tell their stories in new ways. Ergonomically designed and familiar for advanced users, all three cameras will utilize the new Nikon SnapBridge connectivity to make it easier than ever to shoot and share with ease.

“We recognize consumers’ desire for smaller cameras capable of outstanding image quality,” said Masahiro Horie, Director of Marketing and Planning, Nikon Inc. “With the new DL line, Nikon is proud to fuse legendary NIKKOR optics with the latest innovations in imaging to provide advanced photographers amazingly compact tools capable of capturing photos and video that even the most discerned professional would be proud of.”

The Nikon DL Series: Powerful Performance, Superior Optics

The new DL line of premium compact cameras packs innovative and powerful imaging technology into elegantly designed yet remarkably compact camera bodies, making it easier than ever to carry pure imaging prowess in the palm of one’s hand. All of these new cameras are designed with a 20.8-megapixel CX-format (1-inch) BSI CMOS sensor, which when combined with fast, high quality NIKKOR glass, help to create stunning image quality for stills or 4K UHD video. Working alongside the new sensor is the new EXPEED 6A image processor that allows for impressive noise reduction and powerful, fast performance, making it possible to capture stunning low-light street photography, beautiful portraits or spectacular landscapes with ease. 

For fleeting moments and fast-action, the DL line incorporates a high-speed hybrid autofocus (AF) system featuring 105 phase detect focus areas (with 171 focus points in contrast detect AF mode), as well as continuous shooting up to an incredible 20 fps, with capability to capture up to a blazing fast 60 fps with focus locked on the first frame. The DL series also features Dual Detect Optical VR technology to compensate for camera shake while handheld or at slower shutter speeds.

Continuing the impressive legacy of NIKKOR glass, each new DL camera features a unique lens design capable of amazing resolution and beautiful background blur (bokeh), with impressively fast apertures. The lens barrel also includes a manual focus ring, giving users enhanced control over focus on any subject.

Each NIKKOR lens is also equipped with a fluorine coating that helps repel dirt, water and oil, and also facilitates easy cleaning. For the first time in a Nikon compact camera, the DL18-50’s NIKKOR lens will utilize Nano Crystal Coat to help reduce ghost and flare, particularly useful when shooting at a wide-angle. With the best NIKKOR technologies now integrated into compact camera models, users will be able to capture phenomenal images with amazing detail time and time again. 

Control and Versatility

The DL24-85, DL18-50 and DL24-500 put creative control in the hands of each photographer and are all operated using the familiar Nikon DSLR menu design and an assortment of physical controls. The series also supports RAW (NEF) image capture, full PSAM manual controls and over 20 preset creative options, for use in both still and video shooting (including Picture Control, Creative mode, Multiple Exposure Lighten) to help challenge each user to expand their photographic horizons.

The DL line provides the tools to frame nearly every shot, with all three cameras sporting high-resolution 1,037k-dot OLED Touch displays. While the DL24-85 and DL18-50 allow for tilting, the DL24-500’s display provides full Vari-angle capability, vitally important when shooting from unique perspectives. Even further customization and control is possible utilizing the hot shoe/accessory shoe available on DL24-85 and DL18-50 models that allows for complete system expandability with the DF-E1 optional electronic viewfinder. The DL24-500 also sports a hot shoe and a stereo microphone input jack, while all three models are compatible with Nikon i-TTL Speedlights. 

Seamlessly Shoot and Share

Nikon SnapBridge makes it easier than ever to shoot and share amazing images with friends and family. Available throughout Nikon’s newest line of premium compacts, SnapBridge utilizes Bluetooth®1 low energy technology (BLE) to provide an “always on” connection to a compatible2 smart device. Users can now seamlessly send images from their camera to a smart device (utilizing the new SnapBridge app) for easy sharing via social networks or to the cloud for instant storage. An unlimited number of thumbnails and 20 GB of storage will also be available for registered Nikon owners and SnapBridge users on Nikon Image Space, Nikon’s free image storing service. Additionally, built-in Wi-Fi3 and NFC remain available to help facilitate easy connection and sharing. 

Through Nikon SnapBridge, users can also operate their cameras remotely using the app, automatically synchronize time and location information to any image utilizing the camera’s constant connection to a compatible smart device, as well as embed information on any image, including copyright or photographers’ names. Lastly, firmware updates have never been easier, as Nikon will send registered users firmware information via the new SnapBridge application, directly to their smart device.

4K Video Capability

The DL series will be among Nikon’s first compact offerings to support 4K UHD video capability [3840×2160] at 30p, affording users the ability to capture incredibly beautiful video with remarkable detail, all with a compact camera. Multimedia photographers will have free reign over their creative vision with the ability to utilize PSAM selectable exposure modes while recording, alongside popular movie features like HDMI output to an external recorder, slow motion to 1200 fps and the ability to grab stills from video. Other creative video functions available include: Full HD movie, HD movie, Motion Snapshot, Slow motion, 4-second movie, Time-lapse movie, Superlapse movie and Jump cut.

DL24-85: The Premium Compact Camera Ready for Anything

Great for travel, portraits and general photography, the DL24-85 offers pocket-sized imaging power with a fast and versatile 24-85mm focal range. Compatible with 40.5mm threaded filters, the newly designed NIKKOR lens (11 elements in 9 groups) features a 3.6x zoom range (7x with Dynamic Fine Zoom4) and a wide f/1.8-2.8 aperture, empowering users to capture a wide variety of subjects with incredible detail and natural bokeh, even in low-light. The 24-85mm offering also features Dual Detect Optical VR, AF bracketing and a tilting Touch OLED display to make composing from creative angles easier than ever.

Exclusive to this DL model is a new Super Macro Mode (1:1) that helps capture even small subjects in life-size detail. Setting manual zoom on the camera to super macro position allows the user close-up shooting at a 35mm equivalent magnification, providing amazing detail whether shooting flowers in bloom or a wandering ladybug. Macro photographers can utilize a variety of camera functions within the mode, including focus bracketing, manual priority AF (M/A) mode and peaking indication, to truly customize the look and feel of every image.

DL18-50: A Premium Pocket Camera That Can Capture It All

For landscape and architecture shooters looking for compact, ultra-wide angle DL option, the DL18-50 provides a solution that fits easily into any photographer’s pocket. Starting at a wide 18mm and expanding to 50mm (2.8x zoom, 5.5x with Dynamic Fine Zoom) the camera sports a powerful NIKKOR lens with a wide f/1.8-2.8 aperture that makes it easier than ever to produce natural bokeh in any image, while capturing tack-sharp stills and video. This lens is compatible with 46mm filters and features Nikon’s Nano Crystal Coat to help reduce ghosting and flare. 

Those who choose the wide-angle DL premium compact can also take advantage of perspective controls to help compensate for image distortion, particularly for shooting tall objects from the ground like landmarks and skyscrapers. Tailored for architecture shooters, this feature helps to capture the correct perspective with ease.

For use with the DL24-85 and DL18-50, a newly designed optional DF-E1 electronic viewfinder (EVF) will be available for discerning photographers who desire for a traditional eye-level viewfinder to frame their photos. The compact DF-E1 features a 2,359k-dot resolution with eye sensor, alongside a tilting mechanism, diopter adjustment and anti-reflection coating, helping provide further clarity and versatility for DL shooters. 

DL24-500: Get Close and Connect

The DL24-500 offers the longest zoom capability of any DL premium compact, reaching an incredible 500mm focal length and 21x optical zoom (42x with Dynamic Fine Zoom). Combining Nikon’s new 1-inch sensor with this impressive super-zoom NIKKOR lens, the DL24-500 is an ideal choice for users eager to photograph and share anything from concerts to wildlife. Featuring an f/2.8-5.6 aperture, this lens (compatible with 55mm filters) integrates the newest NIKKOR technologies to help render amazing images and background blur, even from afar.

The DL24-500 also features Dual Detect Optical VR, particularly useful when shooting at extremely long focal lengths or without a tripod, a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF) with 2,359k-dot OLED display and an eye-sensor and a Vari-angle 1,037k-dot OLED screen.

Price and Availability

The new DL24-85, DL18-50 and DL24-500 will be available in early summer 2016 for suggested retail prices (SRP) of $ 649.95*, $ 849.95*, and $ 999.95*, respectively. Pricing and availability for the optional DF-E1 electronic viewfinder, compatible with both the DL24-85 and DL18-50, is TBD. For more information on these new Nikon products, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

1 The Bluetooth® word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. and any use of such marks by Nikon Corporation and its affiliates is under license. 

2. WI-FI COMPATIBILITY This camera’s built-in Wi-Fi® capability can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Nikon SnapBridge application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera. The SnapBridge app is not yet available (coming soon in spring 2016) Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPad and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

3. Wi-Fi and the Wi-Fi logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Wi-Fi Alliance. N-Mark is a trademark or registered trademark of NFC Forum, Inc., in the United States and/or other countries.

4. Dynamic Fine Zoom magnification is calculated from the full-wide end of optical zoom

* SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.

Nikon DL18-50 / DL24-85 specifications

  Nikon DL18-50 Nikon DL24-85
Price
MSRP $ 849 $ 649
Body type
Body type Large sensor compact
Sensor
Max resolution 5584 x 3712
Image ratio w:h 3:2
Effective pixels 21 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 23 megapixels
Sensor size 1″ (13.2 x 8.8 mm)
Sensor type BSI-CMOS
Processor Expeed 6A
Color space sRGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
ISO Auto, 100-12800
White balance presets 7
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization Optical
Uncompressed format RAW
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
  • Raw (NEF)
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.) 18–50 mm 24–85 mm
Optical zoom 2.8× 3.5×
Maximum aperture F1.8 – F2.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Digital zoom Yes (4x)
Manual focus Yes
Normal focus range 15 cm (5.91) 30 cm (11.81)
Macro focus range 3 cm (1.18)
Number of focus points 171
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,037,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type OLED
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic (optional)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/2000 sec 1/1600 sec
Maximum shutter speed (electronic) 1/16000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program AE
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Bird Watching
  • Close-up
  • Food
  • HDR
  • Landscape
  • Multiple Exposure Lighten
  • Night Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Selective Color
  • Sports
Built-in flash No Yes
Flash range 5.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flash Yes (via hot shoe)
Continuous drive 60.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1 EV steps)
Videography features
Resolutions 3840 x 2160 (30p, 25p), 1920 x 1080 (60p, 50p, 30p, 25p), 1280 x 720 (60p, 50p, 30p, 25p)
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Videography notes Slow motion: 1080/120p, 720/240p, 800 x 296 (400p), 400 x 144 (1200p)
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port No
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes Wi-Fi with NFC and constant connection via Bluetooth
Remote control Yes (via smartphone)
Physical
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description EN-EL24 lithium-ion battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 290
Weight (inc. batteries) 365 g (0.80 lb / 12.87 oz) 350 g (0.77 lb / 12.35 oz)
Dimensions 106 x 63 x 58 mm (4.17 x 2.48 x 2.28) 105 x 61 x 50 mm (4.13 x 2.4 x 1.97)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes (video)
GPS None

Nikon DL24-500 specifications

Price
MSRP $ 999
Body type
Body type Large sensor compact
Sensor
Max resolution 5584 x 3712
Image ratio w:h 3:2
Effective pixels 21 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 23 megapixels
Sensor size 1″ (13.2 x 8.8 mm)
Sensor type BSI-CMOS
Processor Expeed 6A
Color space sRGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
ISO Auto, 100-12800
White balance presets 7
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization Optical
Uncompressed format RAW
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
  • Raw (NEF)
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.) 24–500 mm
Optical zoom 20.8×
Maximum aperture F2.8 – F5.6
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Digital zoom Yes (4x)
Manual focus Yes
Normal focus range 30 cm (11.81)
Macro focus range 1 cm (0.39)
Number of focus points 171
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Fully articulated
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,037,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type OLED
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic (optional)
Viewfinder coverage 97%
Viewfinder resolution 2,359,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/2000 sec
Maximum shutter speed (electronic) 1/16000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program AE
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Bird Watching
  • Close-up
  • Food
  • HDR
  • Landscape
  • Multiple Exposure Lighten
  • Night Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Selective Color
  • Sports
Built-in flash Yes
Flash range 10.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flash Yes (via hot shoe)
Continuous drive 60.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1 EV steps)
Videography features
Resolutions 3840 x 2160 (30p, 25p), 1920 x 1080 (60p, 50p, 30p, 25p), 1280 x 720 (60p, 50p, 30p, 25p)
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Videography notes Slow motion: 1080/120p, 720/240p, 800 x 296 (400p), 400 x 144 (1200p)
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes Wi-Fi with NFC and constant connection via Bluetooth
Remote control Yes (via smartphone)
Physical
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description EN-EL20A lithium-ion battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 290
Weight (inc. batteries) 780 g (1.72 lb / 27.51 oz)
Dimensions 123 x 90 x 139 mm (4.84 x 3.54 x 5.47)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes (video)
GPS None

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Enthusiast stalwart: Nikon D7200 in-depth review

04 Jun

Following up the success of Nikon’s D7100 is no easy task, but the D7200 promises some notable feature upgrades. Its 24.2MP APS-C sensor is complemented by an updated 51-point AF system that claims sensitivity down to -3EV. Other enhancements include an increased buffer depth, 1080/60p video, built-in Wi-Fi with NFC and improved battery life. We’ve put Nikon’s claims to the test in our in-depth review. Read more

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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