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Posts Tagged ‘CINE’

SLR Magic introduces E-mount Cine 25mm F1.4

25 Apr

SLR Magic will be showing off a new prime for videographers at NAB: the Cine 25mm F1.4. Costing $ 400 and available at the end of May, the 25mm F1.4 will be available in E-mount and will be compatible with both APS-C and full-frame Sony cameras. The lens is a quite compact 78.4mm / 3.05in and weighs 520g / 18.34oz. A manually controlled aperture uses 13 blades. NAB attendees can take a look at the lens in person at SLR Magic’s booth.

Press Release:

Hong Kong, China (April 24, 2017) – SLR Magic extends it’s full frame lens lineup with the SLR Magic CINE 25mm F1.4 wide angle lens. This product will be officially introduced during the upcoming 2017 NAB Show in the Las Vegas Convention Center. There will be a demo at the SLR Magic booth (Central Hall, C2663) during the NAB Show from 24 – 27th April 2017.

The field of view of the SLR Magic CINE 25mm F1.4 opens up many new creative composition opportunities, particularly in the fields of interior, architectural and landscape cinematography and photography. The compact size of the SLR Magic CINE 25mm F1.4 wide angle lens also makes it a good choice of lens to be used with gimbals.

We place our highest priority in the development on our lenses to fulfill the demands of professional cinematographers and photographers. The design and build of the SLR Magic CINE 25mm F1.4 is solid and reliable.

SLR Magic is currently looking for volunteers to test the SLR MAGIC CINE 25mm F1.4 E mount lens at a special price. If interested:

1 ) Send an email to support@slrmagic.com with the subject ” SLR MAGIC CINE 25mm F1.4 lens volunteer + (your name)”.

2 ) Include sample videos/photos or link to photo/video reviews you have done in the past.

THE SLR Magic CINE 25mm F1.4 (MSRP: $ 399 US) will be available from authorized SLR Magic dealers by the end of May, 2017.

Technical Data

SLR Magic CINE 25mm F1.4

Lens Type: Fast standard lens

Compatible Cameras: FE-mount and E-mount cameras

Optical Design: 11 elements in 9 groups

Distance Settings:

Distance range: 0.25m to ?, combined scale meter/feet

Aperture: Manually controlled diaphragm, 13 aperture blades, Lowest value 16.

Filter Mount: Internal thread for 52mm filter; filter mount does not rotate.

Surface Finish: Black anodised

Dimensions:

Length to bayonet mount: approx. 78.40mm (approx. 3.05in)

Largest diameter: approx. 64.64mm (approx. 2.54in)

Weight: approx. 520g (approx. 18.34oz)

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Samyang announces VDSLR 16MM T2.6 cine lens

21 Apr

Lens maker Samyang has launched the new VDSLR 16mm T2.6 cine lens, which is designed for video shooting with uncoupled gear rings with T numbers. This latest launch takes the South Korean manufacturer’s  number of cine lenses up to 19. 13 of those are designed for use with DSLRs, varying from an 8mm fisheye up to a 135mm telephoto, and six for mirrorless system cameras, ranging from 8 to 50mm in focal length.

The new 16mm T2.6 will be available globally from June at a price of 599 Euros in Europe (USD 640). No information on US pricing has been released yet. 

Press Release:

Samyang Introduces VDSLR 16mm T2.6

April 21st, 2017, Seoul, South Korea – Global optics brand, Samyang Optics (http://www.samyanglensglobal.com) announce a new 16mm T2.6 cine lens, designed specifically for video shooting with uncoupled gear rings with T numbers. This launch adds one more lens to the existing 18 cine lenses for DSLR and mirrorless cameras. 

Since 2012, Samyang Optics has released its cine lenses based on the needs of professional videographers. Satisfied with the image quality of Samyang lenses, videographers continuously requested for cine lenses and as an answer, Samyang launched cine lens line up. 

This new launch expands the cine lens line up to a total of 19 lenses: 13 for DSLR cameras varying from 8mm fisheye to 135mm telephoto and 6 for mirrorless cameras varying from 8mm to 50mm. 

Inheriting the renowned image quality of Samyang’s wide-angle lenses, the 16mm angle of view is commonly used by directors of photography around the globe for its versatile usage for wide-angled emotional scenes in film and videos. Along with the existing 14mm, 20mm and 24mm, this new lens will realise the delicate changes in the scenes. 

As a ‘Total Imaging Solution’ optics brand, Samyang Optics now offers 51 lenses: 2 premium XP photo lenses, 2 autofocus lenses, 19 manual focus photo lenses, 19 cine lenses and 9 professional cinema lenses specifically under XEEN brand. 

Launched to complete the Samyang cine lens line up, this new 16mm T2.6 will be available globally from June and will carry a suggested retail price of EUR 599. For more information, visit the Samyang social media channels.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma announces 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 Cine Prime lenses

21 Apr
Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2

Just in time for NAB, Sigma has announced an expansion to its Cine Prime line of lenses, adding the Cine High Speed 14mm T2 and Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2.

The Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2 lenses are designed for use with full frame cameras, and join five existing prime lenses in Sigma’s Cine Prime product line. With the addition of these lenses, Sigma now offers cine prime lenses covering a very useful focal length range of 14mm to 135mm.

As with the other lenses in the set, both new lenses are available PL-mount, EF-mount, and E-mount.

Sigma Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2

In addition to the lenses, Sigma is now offering customers the option to order their cine lenses in metric or imperial measurements, as well as standard or full luminous paint markings. Sigma says that existing customers can swap from one measurement system to another for a fee.

Finally, Sigma is now offering its mount conversion services for owners of its cine lenses, allowing users to switch lenses between EF- and E-mounts.

We’re planning to get some hands-on time with these lenses next week at NAB next week and will share our experience with you.

Press release:

NAB 2017: Sigma Unveils Two New Cine Prime Lenses; Adds New Product Options?

Sigma introduces brand new Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 Prime Lenses

April 20, 2017 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading DSLR lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, today announced its brand new Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 prime lenses and new Cine Prime and Zoom product options.

Sigma is expanding its Cine Prime line to include two brand new lenses: the Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and the Sigma Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2. The high-performance Sigma Cine Prime product line, which now includes the following focal lengths and apertures – 14mm T2, 20mm T1.5, 24mm T1.5, 35mm T1.5, 50mm T1.5, 85mm T1.5 and 135mm T2 – is compatible with the latest full-frame camera sensor technology. Compact in design, the Cine Prime line offers outstanding optical performance and is ready for higher resolution shooting (up to 6K-8K). Both the 14mm T2 and 135mm T2, along with the previously announced Sigma Cine Prime and Zoom lenses, will be available for test-shooting at the Sigma NAB booth C11525.

In addition to this expansion of its Cine Lens Prime line, Sigma is now offering customers the option to order Cine lenses in metric or imperial measurements as well as standard or full luminous paint on markings. Existing customers who wish to swap from one measurement system to the other can do so for a paid fee.

Also, Sigma is now offering its sought-after Mount Conversion Services for the Cine lens customers. The highly successful program ensures continued return on investment for customers, allowing them to convert their lenses to and from EF and E mounts.

You can read the full Sigma announcement including tech specs here as well as download the new Sigma Cine 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 product images here.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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First Look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

23 Feb

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

The new Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens is the first of the company’s new line of ‘MK’ series Fujinon lenses aimed at the ’emerging production’ market. These lenses are designed to meet the needs of cinematographers who require features generally found on cinema lenses, who often work in the Super 35 format, and can’t justify the cost of lenses costing tens of thousands of dollars more than their cameras.

According to Fujifilm, the MK lenses are basically a smaller version of its Cabrio series of cinema lenses, which typically cost $ 20,000 or more. The two lens lines share the same coatings and general mechanical design for moving lenses and groups. Between the 18-55mm and the already-announced MK50-135mm lens, the MK line covers the very useful 18-135mm range for Super 35 shooters.

Perhaps the most interesting feature, however, is Fujifilm’s use of Sony’s E-mount standard, which we’ll look at next.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

So why Sony E-mount? Fujifilm already builds high-end lenses for the PL mount favored by film and broadcast studios. But the company wants to address the burgeoning market of independent filmmakers, small production houses, and other professionals using the Super 35 and APS-C formats. Sony has a huge presence in this market, with many professionals using the Sony FS7, FS5, and even a-series cameras. However, there are few dedicated cinema lenses for E-mount, with many shooters using EF-mount lenses via adapters.

This means there’s a huge potential market of professional videographers who can be targeted. Also, since these lenses are built to mount so close to the sensor, they can’t be adapted to mount on PL mount cameras, meaning that Fujifilm doesn’t risk cannibalizing sales of their HK, ZK, and XK range of cine lenses.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

One difference between cinema lenses and most modern photography lenses is that cinema lenses use an all mechanical design. There’s no ambiguity of movement, such as focus mechanisms that keep turning when they reach the end of their range.

Additionally, gearing on lens elements allows the use of accessories such as a follow focus (a geared control that allows fine-grained, smooth control over focus, often relocated to a more convenient position). The gearing also allows motorized control of any of theses rings, if the lens itself is buried too deeply in a rig or placed on a shoulder mount or Steadicam, where direct access is not practical.

The Fujinons both use the industry-standard 0.8 gear pitch, which allows them to be used with the broadest range of existing accessories.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

An important aspect of cinema lenses is that lens sets are often matched so that lenses are the same (or very similar) size and weight, which facilitates easy switching and doesn’t require the entire camera rig to be modified or rebalanced when a lens change occurs. This way, it’s easy to switch lenses while keeping things such as matte boxes, follow focus, or stabilization systems in place. 

Lenses in a set typically have the same T-stop to insure perfectly consistent exposure when switching lenses, as well as producing the same color and contrast.

The MK lenses appear to achieve this. The MK18-55mm and MK 50-135mm lenses have the exact same weight, dimensions, front diameter, and filter size, which should make it easy to switch between them without issue.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

The MK18-55mm lens, as well as the upcoming MK50-135mm version, are both T2.9 lenses. Unlike F-stops, which are based on the physical aperture size of a lens, T-stops indicate the actual amount of light transmission for the lens. This makes it possible to switch lenses with the confidence that all lighting and exposure settings will be consistent when a lens change occurs, and that all footage can be matched very closely.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

The focus system of this lens is designed to meet the needs of cinematographers. It has 200 degrees of focus rotation, allowing for very precise focus adjustments using a follow focus system. Additionally, the focus mechanism has hard stops at the end of its range, making it possible to do things like mark positions for a focus pull with no ambiguity about where focus will occur. In contrast, most DSLR or mirrorless lenses continue rotating even after reaching the end of their focus range, making this extremely difficult.

The lens also includes precise distance marks. This may not be a big deal to still photographers, who typically focus through the lens or on an LCD screen, but it’s important if you have a separate focus puller who’s trying to follow the action in a ‘blocked’ scene, where all the action takes place at prearranged distances.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

Another feature that is hugely valuable for video work, yet not generally important for stills, is a parfocal design.

Parfocal zooms maintain focus at the same distance, even when you change the focal length. This is of little value in the autofocus world of stills shooting: it’s trivial to get the lens to refocus after a zoom and before you fire the shutter. But in the realm of video shooting, where the process of zooming the lens may be part of the final product, you can’t afford for the footage to drop out of focus, mid shot.

The parfocal design means, for instance, you can frame a wide-shot of a two-person interview and then zoom-in on one of the subjects, without them dropping out of focus. Both of the Fujinon lenses exhibit parfocal behavior. Zoom can be adjusted using the included lever or via the lens gearing.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

In addition to parfocal design, another desirable property of cinema lenses is that they don’t exhibit lens breathing, a phenomena in which adjusting the focus of a lens slightly changes the field of view at the same time.

As with parfocal design, this isn’t a big issue for most still photographers as only the ‘decisive moment’ is being captured. For cinematographers, however, adjusting focus during a shot is very common (racking between two subjects, for example), and it’s distracting to the audience when this also causes the field of view to shift. As such, the MK18-55mm is designed to suppress lens breathing during focus operations.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

In addition to regular shooting, the MK18-55mm also includes a macro function that makes it possible to focus within a few inches of the front lens element. It’s probably not something most people will use all the time, but if you need a macro shot in your production it allows you to capture the footage without bringing in a non-standard lens.

Additionally, and consistent with being developed alongside studio-quality lenses, the MK lenses feature an adjustment flange to correct back focus. In video circles, ‘back focus’ refers to the distance at which the lens is attempting to focus its image: and perfect performance can require very slight adjustment to correct for any manufacturing tolerances. Studio cameras often allow tiny movements of their mount to ensure the correct lens to sensor distance. Since the MK lenses are likely to be used on cameras without this correction, it’s included in the lens, instead.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

One of the most exciting aspects about the Fujinon MK lenses requires taking another look at why these are going to be E-mount lenses.

In addition to a potential market of E-mount videographers, and Sony’s willingness to share its E-mount specification, there’s another reason we suspect Fujifilm has gone with E rather than EF or PL: the similarity to its own X mount. While the details differ, the flange-back distances of the two mounts vary by only 0.3mm, meaning that any optical design that works for the E-mount should work similarly well for Fujifilm’s X-mount.

In fact, Fujifilm has already announced that X-mount versions of these lenses are being developed for launch later this year, which raises the question: is Fujifilm really expecting owners of current X-mount cameras to spend $ 4000 on video-specific lenses? Or does this lens, and all the work done on developing the X-T2’s 4K capabilities, herald a more substantial entry for Fujifilm into the semi-pro video space?

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Fujinon MK18-55 T2.9 cine lens: First impressions and shooting experience

22 Feb
Setting up the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens with the Sony FS7 and Zacuto rig. (I accidentally left the matte box back at the office. Shh… don’t tell anyone.)

Fujifilm is a respected name in the photography world thanks in part to its highly regarded X-series cameras and lenses. However, Fujifilm is also a major player in the professional cinema market, producing cinema lenses with prices that reach upward of $ 90,000. The company is now extending its cinema expertise into what it calls the ‘emerging production’ market: users who need capabilities and features beyond what’s available in standard DSLR or mirrorless lenses, but who don’t have a budget to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a single lens.

The Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cinema lens is the first in Fujifilm’s new MK line of Super 35 lenses designed specifically for this market. It will be joined later in the year by the matching MK50-135mm T2.9 lens, giving users complete coverage of the very useful 18-135mm range of focal lengths. The MK line is based on the company’s Cabrio line of cinema lenses, which have prices starting around $ 15,000, and both lens lines share the same coatings and basic mechanical build. At $ 3,799, the MK18-55 is still a bit pricey by photography standards, but a relative bargain for a high quality cinema lens.

Sony E-mount on a Fujinon lens? Read our First Look slide show to learn why.

Despite being a Fujifilm product, this lens uses Sony E-mount. (We discuss Fujifilm’s reasons for choosing E-mount in our First Look slide show.) As a result, I tested the lens attached to a Sony FS7, a Super 35 camera that’s very popular among this segment of users.

Shooting with the MK18-55mm T2.9

We only had a couple days to do our testing, so I threw together a quick shoot highlighting one of the Pacific Northwest’s favorite sports – climbing – and met up with local climber Jay Griffin at The Mountaineers climbing wall in Seattle. This scenario was perfect for shooting with focal lengths across the range of the lens, as well as for some good follow focus opportunities.

TL;DR – I really like this lens. In fact, I won’t even make you wait to get to the video, so here it is:

Video shot using the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens and Sony FS7 camera. All footage was captured in DCI 4K/24p using Sony SLog3, edited in Final Cut Pro X, and graded using LUTs from Color Grading Central.

I chose to shoot the entire video shoulder-mounted, so I set up the FS7 on a Zacuto Recoil rig with rails, a Z-Drive follow focus, and a Gratical Eye viewfinder, along with the FS7’s remote grip. This is a fairly straightforward setup, but it takes a few minutes to arrange all the pieces so that everything works correctly and is ergonomically arranged for the camera operator

Setting up the rig highlighted one of the important features of the MK lenses: they’re matched. For this shoot I only had the MK18-55mm available, but later in the year Fujifilm will be adding the MK 50-135mm to the line as well; both lenses share the same weight and dimensions. In a two-lens shoot, it would be incredibly easy to switch between the two while leaving things like matte boxes and follow focus in place. Also, since both lenses have identical T-stops it would be easy to match exposure as well.

Using the lens was a joy. As with most cinema lenses, it’s completely mechanical, and build quality is outstanding. Every movement feels well damped, and one gets the immediate sense that it’s a high quality piece of precision equipment.

One place where this mechanical build is immediately noticeable is the focus ring. Unlike most modern DSLR or mirrorless lenses, which continue to spin after reaching the end of their focus range, the MK18-55mm has hard stops.

Working with a follow focus is a breeze thanks to the mechanical lens design and geared focus ring.

It was simple to set up the Z-Drive follow focus with the standard pitch gearing on the focus ring, and thanks to the 200 degree focus rotation angle it was easy to make precise focus adjustments, using peaking in the viewfinder as a guide. The large rotation angle made it easy to adjust for small movements or to follow Jay when he moved slowly. You don’t get this level of precision with the shorter focus throw of most DSLR lenses, and you certainly don’t get it with focus-by-wire!

I didn’t notice any obvious signs of lens breathing, a phenomena that causes a lens’s field of view to change slightly as a lens is focused. Breathing is fairly common on stills camera lenses, and it rears its ugly head when you’re trying to do something like rack focus between two subjects. Cine lenses are designed to suppress lens breathing, and as far as I could tell the MK18-55 did so extremely well.

Like other cine lenses, the MK18-55mm has a parfocal design, meaning it should maintain precise focus during zooming. Still photographers often don’t care much about this since it’s simple to zoom and then refocus before taking a shot. For video work, however, you sometimes want the zoom to be part of the shot. Loosing focus mid-zoom is a big deal.

Since I was using a shoulder mount rig without an assistant, it wasn’t very practical to test the parfocal performance of the lens with Jay. However, back in the studio I lined up the lens with our studio scene and confirmed that its performance is excellent in this regard; once focused, the subject remains in focus throughout the zoom range.

 Shooting with the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 lens and Sony FS7.

It should be pretty obvious by now that I really enjoyed using the MK18-55mm. In addition to finding it well designed and delightful to work with, I was very pleased with the footage I captured. Optical performance appears to be outstanding. Based on my brief experience I would have no qualms about shooting a full project with this lens. It’s exciting to see Fujifilm entering this market, and I’m really looking forward to future lenses in the MK line.

Now, bring on the MK50-135mm so I can use the set!

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Rokinon 20mm F1.8 and Cine DS 20mm T1.9 Full Frame Super Wide Angle lenses now available

30 Dec

Rokinon has announced the launch of its new Rokinon Digital Photo 20mm F1.8 and Cine DS 20mm T1.9 Full Frame Super Wide Angle lenses. Both lenses are made from high-strength aluminum alloy and feature a super-wide 94.8-degree view, a non-rotating 77mm filter mount, Rokinon’s Ultra Multi-Coating, and a quiet, smooth focusing control.

These prime lenses, say Rokinon, offer both fast aperture and ‘the full frame perspective of 20mm,’ offering a solution that falls between the maker’s similar 14mm and 24mm models. These 20mm lenses have a 7.9in / 0.20m minimum focusing distance, 13 elements in 12 groups, three extra-low dispersion elements, and a pair of aspherical elements.

In addition to the ‘common’ features shared between the lenses, the Cine DS lens features geared aperture and controls, a de-clicked aperture control ring, and dual right/left side distance and t-stop scales. 

The Digital Photo lens is available for Canon, Nikon AE, Sony E, Micro Four Thirds, Pentax K, and Fuji X mounts (MSRP $ 599), while the Cine DS lens ($ 799 on B&H Photo) is available for Canon, Nikon, Sony E, and Micro Four Thirds mounts.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma announces pricing for 18-35mm T2 and 50-100mm T2 Cine lenses

20 Oct

Sigma announced its new line of cinema lenses back in September. Today it announced that the first two lenses in that line to go on sale, the 18-35mm T2 and 50-100 T2, will both ship on December 9, 2016 for $ 4000 each. Both will be available in EF, E and PL mounts.

These weatherproof lenses are completely mechanical and designed for use with ultra high resolution cameras, including those capable of 6 and 8K capture. And another five lenses are slated to join the new cinema line over the course of 2017 including a 24-35 F2.2 and a 20mm, 24mm, 35mm, 50mm and 80mm set of T1.5 primes.

Press release:

Sigma Announces Cine High Speed Zoom Lens Pricing and Availability

Cine High Speed Zoom 18-35mm T2 and 50-100mm T2 lenses begin shipping on December 9 for a retail price of $ 3999.00 USD

New York, NY – October 20, 2016 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading DSLR lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, announced today that the Cine High Speed Zoom 18-35mm T2 and 50-100mm T2 lenses will begin shipping on December 9, 2016 for a retail price of $ 3999.00 USD. Born from the new Sigma Cine family of products, the High Speed Zoom lenses leverage the outstanding optical design of the company’s world-renowned Global Vision still photography lenses. Combined with the 100% new mechanical lens body design, the Cine lenses meet needs of advanced 6k and 8k cinema production with the core optical quality DNA that has defined the Sigma benchmark of imaging excellence.

See the Sigma Cine Family of Products at PDN/PPE 2016 Expo
Demonstrated for the first time to the public in the United States, attendees to the 2016 PDN PhotoPlus International Conference + Expo (PPE), held at the Javits Convention Center in New York City from October 20-22, 2016, can see first-hand the new Sigma Cine family of lenses:

Cine High Speed Zoom Line – 18-35mm T2 and 50-100mm T2
The high speed zoom line, which is compatible with the Super35 image size standard, offers the constant aperture of T2 throughout the zoom range with superior optical performance that is capable of high-resolution 6K-8K shooting. Delivering the highest image quality in its class, the High Speed Zoom is ergonomically compact and designed for E, EF and PL camera system mounts.

Cine FF Zoom Line – 24-35mm T2.2 FF
Compatible with a full-frame image sensor, the FF Zoom’s outstanding optical performance also supports 6K-8K shooting. Because so few lenses cater to the requirements of the latest digital cinema cameras’ image sensors, this line provides a rare option for cinematographers. The FF Zoom is designed for E and EF camera system mounts.

Cine FF High Speed Prime Line – 20mm T1.5 FF, 24mm T1.5 FF, 35mm T1.5 FF, 50mm T1.5 FF and 85mm T1.5 FF
The Cine High Speed Prime lineup features lenses ranging from 20mm to 85mm, with all five touting an aperture of T1.5. Highly compact and compatible with full-frame sensors, these lenses offer superior resolution. They bring a consistent level of light to the production, offering greater consistency to any film’s color, contrast and overall look before it enters post-production. The FF High Speed Prime line is designed for E, EF and PL camera system mounts.

For more information on the Sigma Cine Lenses, please visit https://www.sigmaphoto.com/cinema-lenses/?link=Sept-M-cine.

About Sigma Corporation
Craftsmanship. Precision. Dedication. Since 1961, Sigma has been devoted the pursuit of advancing photographic technology. Unique to the industry, the family-owned business produces its high-quality, award-winning camera lenses, DSLR cameras, flashes, filters and accessories from its state-of-the-art manufacturing facility located in Aizu, Japan.

In 2012, the company introduced the Sigma Global Vision with three distinct lens lines: Art, Contemporary and Sport. Designed for industry camera mount systems including Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Pentax, Sony and Sigma, each lens is handcrafted and tested in Japan to ensure a high-performance, premium product that is purpose-built to last.

Sigma continues its tradition of imaging excellence with the mirrorless sd Quattro, sd Quattro H and the compact dp Quattro camera line. Leveraging the ultra-high resolution Foveon sensor, the Sigma Quattro cameras are designed to produce the highest quality image with every shot.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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SLR Magic announces 35mm and 75mm CINE primes for FE-mount

04 Jun

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SLR Magic has announced two new E-mount prime lenses aimed at videographers and filmmakers. The CINE 35mm F1.2 and CINE 75mm F1.4 lenses provide fast maximum apertures, include geared barrels for use with follow focus rigs, and are compatible with FE full frame cameras.

The two lenses have several features in common, including manual diaphragm with 13 aperture blades that stop down to F16, 52mm filter threads with non-rotating front elements, a black anodized finish.

Both lenses have a retail price of $ 499 and SLR Magic says they should be available from dealers by August. The company will have hands on demos available at the CINE GEAR 2016 show from June 3-4 in Los Angeles.


Press release:

NEW: THE SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2 and SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4

Hong Kong, China (June 3, 2016) – SLR Magic extends it’s FE-mount lineup with the SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2 wide angle lens and SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4 telephoto lens. The products will be officially introduced during upcoming CINE GEAR 2016 show in Los Angeles.

The field of view of the SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2 and SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4 opens up many new creative composition opportunities, particularly in the fields of portrait, interior, architectural and landscape cinematography and photography.

We place our highest priority in the development on our lenses to fulfill the demands of professional cinematographers and photographers. The design and build of the the SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2 and SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4 is solid and reliable.

THE SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2 (MSRP: $ 499 US/ $ 3,299 RMB) and SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4 (MSRP: $ 499 US/ $ 3,299 RMB) will be available from authorised SLR Magic dealers by August, 2016.

The SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2 and SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4 will be first presented at CINE GEAR 2016 show. There would be a demo at the ATOMOS booth in (Stage 16) during the show held in Paramount Studios in Los Angeles from 3rd to 4th of June 2016.

Technical Data

SLR Magic CINE 35mm F1.2

  • Lens Type: Fast standard lens
  • Compatible Cameras: FE-mount and E-mount cameras
  • Optical Design: 9 elements in 8 groups
  • Distance Settings:
  • Distance range: 0.3m to ?, combined scale meter/feet
  • Aperture: Manually controlled diaphragm, 13 aperture blades , Lowest value 16
  • Filter Mount: Internal thread for 52mm filter; filter mount does not rotate.
  • Surface Finish: Black anodized
  • Dimensions: 
  • Length to bayonet mount: approx. 77.40mm (approx. 3.05in)
  • Largest diameter: approx. 64.73mm (approx. 2.55in)
  • Weight: approx. 535g (approx. 18.87oz)

SLR Magic CINE 75mm F1.4

  • Lens Type: Fast standard lens
  • Compatible Cameras: FE-mount and E-mount cameras
  • Optical Design: 6 elements in 6 groups
  • Distance Settings: 
  • Distance range: 0.70m to ?, combined scale meter/feet
  • Aperture: Manually controlled diaphragm, 13 aperture blades , Lowest value 16
  • Filter Mount: Internal thread for 52mm filter; filter mount does not rotate.
  • Surface Finish: Black anodized
  • Dimensions: 
  • Length to bayonet mount: approx. 78.68mm (approx. 3.09in)
  • Largest diameter: approx. 64.67mm (approx. 2.55in)
  • Weight: approx. 455g (approx. 16.05oz)

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera

07 Jan

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For the first time in over thirty years, Kodak has announced plans to launch a Super 8 cine camera, introducing a model that mixes analogue and digital technology. The new camera, which doesn’t appear to have a name other than Kodak Super 8 Camera, will record its movies on normal Super 8 film cartridges but will offer a digital LCD flip-out panel as viewfinder. In keep with the old slogan ‘You Press The Button, We Do The Rest’, Kodak says that cartridges will be sold with processing included and that customers will receive the film back as well as access to a scan of the film that they can download for more convenient editing. 

The camera comes with an integrated microphone for audio recording, and while the company hasn’t said specifically, it appears that sound is stored using SD memory cards via a slot on the camera’s rear. Super 8 film no longer comes with an audio track, so this seems the most likely solution. The camera is also equipped with three communication ports that may be used for streaming content out during recording, as well as for charging the battery. 

The camera will be capable of shooting at 9, 12, 18, 24 and 25 frames per second. It will come with either a Ricoh 6mm or 6-48mm lens, but its use of a C-Mount means it will be compatible with an enormous range of existing lenses. There appears to be two designs of the camera, one with retro squared edges, and one rounder and more modern-looking. 

Kodak currently offers three color negative Super 8 films under the Vision3 series: a 50 ISO daylight film and two tungsten emulsions rated at ISO 500 and 200. A black and white TRI-X reversal is also available. The films come in lengths of 50 feet and the cameras fit 72 frames of footage on to each foot, giving 3600 frames per cartridge. At 24 fps users will get two and half minutes of movie, and the cartridges take just a couple of seconds to exchange. 

The Super 8 system first went on sale in 1965 with the intention of making home movies easier to produce. The cartridge made loading the film much more convenient and less prone to jamming the camera than previous hand-threaded systems, and the cartridge could inform the camera what type of film was loaded, so amateurs made fewer mistakes. Sound recording came in 1973 when a magnetic strip was introduced, but it was phased out again in 1997 as the substance used to bond the strip to the film was hazardous. 

With its recording strips and automated cartridges the APS film system borrowed much from the ideals of Super 8, and this half digital, half film camera might remind us of Kodak’s Advantix Preview APS camera that recorded images on film but showed a digital preview on the rear screen.

Kodak hasn’t announced officially how much the new camera will be, but the company’s chief executive, Jeff Clarke, is quoted in the Wall Street Journal Digits blog as saying that it will arrive in fall 2016 and will cost between $ 400 and $ 750. The film should cost between $ 50 to $ 75 per cartridge, including processing. He also says a lower-cost model will emerge in 2017. 

For more information visit the Kodak website. 

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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