RSS
 

Posts Tagged ‘captured’

This stunning timelapse captured SpaceX’s glowing Falcon 9 launch

27 Dec

Last Friday, SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Airforce Base on the California coast. But the light show it created in the evening sky looked less like a rocket launch and more like an alien light show, stopping traffic on the highways as people pulled over to take cell phone pictures and video of what they thought might just be the beginning of an alien takeover.

Fortunately for all of us, it wasn’t just bystanders with smartphones who pointed their cameras skyward on Friday the 22nd, photographer Jesse Watson had already prepared to capture the launch, and came away with this stunning timelapse of the entire thing from Yuma, Arizona.

As he explains in the video’s description, this was actually the first rocket launch he’s captured:

I found out about this specific launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base a few days prior to the event. I wanted to capture this amazing spectacle in a fashion that I haven’t seen previously, as most of what I have seen is cell phones video or news reels.

[…]

I have never shot a rocket launch before, so I did not know exactly what to expect as far as exposure or precise location of the rocket in the horizon. I wanted to be prepared to capture comprehensive coverage of the spectacle. Therefore I packed four cameras and five lenses, to cover wide to telephoto details of the scene. Three of the cameras were rolling time-lapse and 1 was setup for telephoto video.

That’s how he captured the 40-second timelapse above: using two Nikon D810s, a Sony a7S II, and a Sony a6500 sporting a Nikon AF-S 14-24mm F2.8G, Sigma 85mm F1.4 |Art, Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 |Contemporary, and a Veydra Mini Prime 25mm T2.2 for Sony E-mount, respectively.

Check out the results for yourself up top, and then head over to the Vimeo page for a full gear list in the description.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on This stunning timelapse captured SpaceX’s glowing Falcon 9 launch

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Sigma releases full-res sample photos captured with 16mm F1.4 DC DN lens

20 Nov

The new Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary lens made for APS-C E-Mount and M43 cameras has a lot of crop-sensor shooters very intrigued. Sigma says this lens boasts quality on par with its Art lens lineup, and our own hands-on at PPE 2017 was very positive. But before you order the lens—which ships at the end of this month and costs a very tempting $ 450—you’ll want to check out the gallery below.

Sigma Global has finally released official, full-resolution sample photos captured with the new lens. Despite the lens being made primarily for APS-C E-Mount, Sigma shooter Wataru Nakamura used a Sony A7RII to capture these samples in the camera’s 3:2 crop mode (17.8MP resolution).

Check them out for yourself below, or head over to the Sigma Global website to download the samples yourself:

$ (document).ready(function() { SampleGalleryV2({“containerId”:”embeddedSampleGallery_0548830374″,”galleryId”:”0548830374″,”isEmbeddedWidget”:true,”standalone”:false,”selectedImageIndex”:0,”startInCommentsView”:false,”isMobile”:false}) });
Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Sigma releases full-res sample photos captured with 16mm F1.4 DC DN lens

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Stunning ‘orbital drone-lapse’ captured by flying a drone in huge circles

14 Nov

It’s difficult to stand out when creating a time-lapse these days—from the storm-lapses of Mike Oblinski, to the ‘flow-motion’ hyperlapses of Rob Whitworth, to the award-winning work of Michael Shainblum, it seems like it’s all been done. Until, that is, someone comes up with something like ‘Low Earth Orbit.’

This drone-lapse from Folegandros Island, Greece was captured by Hong Kong-based production company Visual Suspect using a simple ‘orbital’ technique; translation: they flew a drone in massive circles while recording time-lapse.

The results look like something out of Google Earth, but instead of static low-res images from orbit, you have living landscapes captured in HD. Here’s an explanation of the “how” and “why” by the creators themselves:

Orbital drone movements are the ones with power to convert two dimensional images into dancing focal layers escaping out of the frame. We wanted to further explore the technique, with high altitude long orbits, along with ones very close to the ground, we call them “Orbital drone-lapses”. These shots are a mix of automatic and manual flights.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Stunning ‘orbital drone-lapse’ captured by flying a drone in huge circles

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Video: 4K cinematic footage captured with Apple’s new iPhone 8 Plus

28 Sep

Filmmaker Matteo Bertoli—who you may remember from his very popular iPhone 7 Plus cinematic video—recently got an iPhone 8 Plus to test out. And so he put on his walking shoes and spent some time shooting with the new phone all over the Los Angeles area.

The result is the 2:40 video above, all of it captured in 4K, all of it captured with the iPhone 8 Plus in either 24p, 48p or 60p, and most of it shot handheld with the exception of a few slider shots. All of the footage was captured using the Filmic Pro app (which allows Bertoli to shoot in Log, although it gave him some trouble with iOS 11), and then edited using DaVinci Resolve 14.

The results didn’t disappoint.

“I was super impressed by the colors this iPhone is able to pull out,” writes Bertoli in the video description. “Dynamic range is also very impressive and finally the second camera was improved at a point where you can actually use it for video. Bummer it doesn’t have OIS like the iPhone X.”

This video is one of the first well-rounded examples of 4K cinematic footage we’ve seen from the new phone, so if you’re curious what Apple’s latest smartphone can do with video, definitely give Bertoli’s creation a watch. Now we just have to wait for a few iPhone X models to make their way into the wild…

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Video: 4K cinematic footage captured with Apple’s new iPhone 8 Plus

Posted in Uncategorized

 

These guys captured the total solar eclipse from a stratospheric balloon

26 Aug

For all of the many (many many) eclipse photos and videos that have been release, this is probably a view you haven’t seen yet: the shadow of the moon traversing Oregon, as seen from a stratospheric balloon.

The video was captured by Liem Bahneman, a self-proclaimed ‘armchair aeroscience geek’ who posted the final version to his Vimeo account alongside this description:

I launched a camera-laden balloon before totality passed over Central Oregon. There were three still cameras (one being a Ricoh Theta 360) and a GoPro recording video. This is the edited video, showing launch, the shadow of totality passing, and the last 40 seconds is the last of the footage before the battery died.

The video more or less explains itself. After reaching altitude around the 40-second mark, you begin to see the shadow of the moon creep over the landscape from the right of the frame… and keep creeping until it’s pass through and off into the distance stage-left. It might not be as awe-inspiring as watching the sun become obscured, but it’s still somehow mind-blowing to see so much of the Earth cast in darkness.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on These guys captured the total solar eclipse from a stratospheric balloon

Posted in Uncategorized

 

NASA captured photos and video of the ISS ‘photobombing’ today’s solar eclipse

22 Aug
The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Photo credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Plenty of people were pointing their cameras up at the solar eclipse today, but leave it to NASA to capture a little something extra. From his vantage point in Banner, Wyoming, NASA photo editor Joel Kowsky captured a dual eclipse of sorts: the moon obscuring the sun, and the tiny pinprick of the International Space Station obscuring a little bit of what was left.

As the ISS and its six crew members flew in front of the partially obscured disk of the sun, Kowsky had both still and slow motion video cameras trained on his target.

Here’s a closer crop of the photograph above:

Here, a composite that shows the ISS’s full transit across the partial eclipse:

And, finally, a slow motion video of the transit, recorded by Kowsky at 1,500 frames a second:

To see these photos and video in their full glory, head over to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flickr account.


All photos and video courtesy of NASA/Joel Kowsky

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on NASA captured photos and video of the ISS ‘photobombing’ today’s solar eclipse

Posted in Uncategorized

 

MIT’s newest photography tech can retouch an image before it’s captured

04 Aug

MIT has developed a new machine learning technology that is able to retouch an image in real-time, presenting the photographer with the final product before they snap the photo. The system, which is being presented by both Google and MIT researchers at the digital graphics conference Siggraph in Los Angeles, was trained using thousands of both raw and retouched images that comprise a dataset created by MIT and Adobe, among others.

The automatic image retouching system is lightweight enough to be used on an ordinary smartphone, and it can be equipped with multiple different styles. While real-time image retouching isn’t a new idea, the ability to perform it on a smartphone is. Talking about this, researcher Jon Barron explains:

Using machine learning for computational photography is an exciting prospect but is limited by the severe computational and power constraints of mobile phones. This paper may provide us with a way to sidestep these issues and produce new, compelling, real-time photographic experiences without draining your battery or giving you a laggy viewfinder experience.

In order for the image retouching to work in real-time on low power devices like smartphones, the researchers developed a system that modifies a low-resolution version of the final image, then translates those edits to the full-resolution photo.

With this method arose a big problem, however. Namely, that the low-resolution image doesn’t contain enough data to adequately determine edits for the full-resolution version. Two different solutions were found to solve this problem, the first being that the system outputs ‘a set of simple formulae’ rather than the low-res image itself, and the second being a method for applying the formulae to the full-resolution photo. The team explains that technology in detail in the video below:

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on MIT’s newest photography tech can retouch an image before it’s captured

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Venus Optics shows off footage captured with forthcoming Laowa 15mm F2

09 Jul

Venus Optics has a new lens on the way – the 15mm F2, for Sony’s E mount. Billed as the world’s fastest 15mm lens, Laowa claims zero distortion. And stabilized footage shot with the new 15mm certainly looks nice.

We got our hands on a prototype version of the 15mm last year at Photokina, and we’re expecting a reviewable sample to arrive in our office very soon. Watch this space for sample images!

Read our hands-on with the Laowa 15mm F2 (Sept 2016)

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on Venus Optics shows off footage captured with forthcoming Laowa 15mm F2

Posted in Uncategorized

 

The Power of a Photograph – Iconic Moments Captured as Images

09 Mar

As photographers, we have a great power. We can capture moments in time that are unique, iconic, emotional and powerful. Photography has the power to change things.

By Bronson ABbott

See some of the ways that photographs have this power:

  • We have the power to capture human moments
  • Moments of loss the desperation
  • Of Defiance
  • Moments of bravery
  • Those of love and respect
  • And moments of triumph

How do you use your photography in powerful ways? What are you favorite iconic photographs from history and why? Please share in the comments below about how you feel photography is powerful in our lives.

The post The Power of a Photograph – Iconic Moments Captured as Images by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.


Digital Photography School

 
Comments Off on The Power of a Photograph – Iconic Moments Captured as Images

Posted in Photography

 

In Photos: Iceland captured in infrared

07 Jun

kirjufell.jpg

Iceland, it seems, is extremely photogenic. Photographers traveling the country routinely emerge with stunning photos of mountains and waterfalls. Visiting for the first time, Andy Lee saw an opportunity to bring out even more of the drama in the country’s already dramatic landscapes. He used a DSLR converted for infrared photography, capturing the scenery in deep blues and blacks. See gallery

News: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
Comments Off on In Photos: Iceland captured in infrared

Posted in Uncategorized