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Posts Tagged ‘14mm’

Leak: Samyang to announce autofocus 14mm F2.8 lens for Canon EF mount

06 Jan

Nokishita has gotten their hands on two lens photos that have Canon users buzzing this morning. Just days after Yongnuo announced its (probably very cheap) YN 14mm F2.8 for Canon, Samyang/Rokinon are reportedly preparing to do you one better by releasing its own AF 14mm F2.8 for EF mount.

We have no details about the lens beyond the photos above, but if (or more likely when) this lens is announced, it will be the first Samyang autofocus lens for Canon’s EF mount—so far, all of the Samyang/Rokinon AF lenses released have been made for Sony’s FE mount.

Nokishita typically releases leaked image like the ones above only a day or two (if not hours) before the official announcement, so stay tuned for more.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Yongnuo announces YN 14mm F2.8 in Canon mount

30 Dec

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Yongnuo has made a name for itself as the go-to brand for cheap photo gear, and that includes several Canon lens alternatives (some of which seem like outright clones) that sacrifice some quality while slashing 60-80% or even more off the price. So far, Yongnuo has released its own versions of Canon’s 50mm F1.8, 35mm F2, 85mm F1.8, and 100mm F2. And today, they add one more to the list.

Meet the Yongnuo YN 14mm F2.8: a lens that looks very similar to Canon’s own 14mm F2.8L II. Here they are side by side:

According to Yongnuo’s description, the YN 14mm F2.8 sports 12 lens elements in 9 groups (Canon’s has 14 elements in 11 groups) and a 7-blade aperture (Canon’s has 6 blades). The other big difference is the focus motor. The Canon 14mm F2.8L II USM has an ultrasonic motor, while Yongnuo’s 14mm sports a standard DC motor; expect a much louder experience if you’re going to try out this lens.

The minimum focusing distance (0.2 meters), aperture range (F2.8-F22), magnification (0.15x), and angle of view (114°) are all identical.

Finally, the Yongnuo 14mm F2.8 will feature the same USB connection as the company’s 100mm F2, allowing for firmware updates that could help sand down the lens’ rougher edges after it makes its way into consumer hands.

For now, we don’t know when the Yongnuo YN 14mm F2.8 will officially arrive at online retailers, but we’ll keep an eye out for you.

As for cost, the Canon 14mm F2.8L II retails for $ 2,100. And while we don’t yet know exactly how much Yongnuo plans to charge for the YN 14mm F2.8, you can bet it’ll cost a whole lot less than two grand. To give you a frame of reference, Canon’s 100mm F2 USM lens goes for $ 500; the Yongnuo knock-off is just 160 bucks.

To learn more about this lens, head over to the Yongnuo website.


Editor’s Note: The post has been updated to more clearly point out the differences between the Yongnuo 14mm and Canon 14mm F2.8L II. Our apologies if the original came off as misleading by using the term ‘clone’.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Video: Shooting the Milky Way hand-held with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art

05 Dec

More than once, we’ve called the Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art lens an astrophotographer’s dream lens. From the moment it was announced, we were dying to get our hands on it; and once we did, it did not disappoint. But what’s the big deal? Why pay $ 1,600 for this lens when the very capable Samyang/Rokinon 14mm F2.4 will cost you half as much and resolve nearly as much detail (if not more)?

Light… that’s why. A point explained beautifully by photographer Alyn Wallace, who recently took the 14mm F1.8 Art out for a spin in the night. After managing to take a hand-held photograph of the Milky Way—an insane and somewhat-pointless but also kind-of-fun experiment to see what F1.8 can really do—he pops the lens onto a tripod for some proper astrophotography and is immediately blown away.

“This lens is a light vacuum,” he says. “It’s like I’ve stuck a black hole on the front of my camera.”

DPReview’s Dale Baskin felt similarly after shooting the Aurora with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art, writing in his Gear of The Year post, “Once I tried the Sigma 14mm F1.8 it was game over. I knew I had found the one.”

Of course, the lens isn’t perfect, and Wallace gets into that as well, looking closely at the corners and revealing where pushing this lens to F1.8 is going to cost you. To see his results and drool a bit over a piece of glass that may make its way onto your very own “treat yourself” list this holiday season, check out the full video up top.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Astrophotography lens shootout: Samyang 14mm F2.4 vs Sigma 14mm F1.8

02 Dec

If you’re thinking of picking up a great ultra-wide astrophotography lens, chances are good you’ve looked at the three 14mm primes featured in this video. The old Samyang 14mm F2.8 is a classic and affordable choice; the updated Samyang 14mm F2.4 is faster, higher quality, and not prohibitively expensive; and the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art is a lens astrophotographers have been drooling over ever since it was announced in February.

So which do you pick, and why?

NatureTTL’s Matthew Saville took all three lenses into the middle of the desert to shoot some nightscapes and compare the performance of these extremely popular choices.

You’ll definitely want to check out the full video if you’re deeply uncertain about which to choose—there are some great side-by-side sharpness comparisons that should satisfy the pixel peepers out there—but Saville manages to break the trio down into a very neat categories:

The Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art is your choice if you absolutely need the extra light over the F2.4 and don’t mind spending a bunch more money to get it. It’s extremely sharp, and will deliver exceptional results… even wide open… even in the corners.

The Samyang 14mm F2.4 is hard to beat as an overall choice when you look at performance-to-price ratio. To his eye, it’s a tiny bit sharper in the corners wide open than the Sigma—even when you stop the Sigma down to F2.4—and it’ll cost you half as much. You are, of course, sacrificing AutoFocus over the Sigma, but many nightscape and night sky photographers shoot in manual focus all the time anyway.

The Samyang 14mm F2.8 is by far the most affordable of the bunch. This classic lens will cost you as little as $ 250 on sale, making it less than half as much as the Samyang 14mm F2.4, which was already half the price of the Sigma 14mm. But that drop in price comes with a significant drop in performance. Saville labels it a great choice for those just getting into nightscape photography, as a time-lapse lens if you’ll be displaying your footage in 1080p, or as a solid backup that is so cheap it would be silly not to own one.

Check out the full video up top to hear all of Saville’s thoughts on these three popular 14mm primes. And if you want to find out more about why the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens just might be worth spending that bundle of money on, click on the big blue button below to read about why DPReview’s Dale Baskin named it his Gear of the Year 2017.

Gear of the Year 2017 – Dale’s choice: Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Gear of the Year 2017 – Dale’s choice: Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art

01 Dec
Sigma’s 14mm F1.8 Art lens makes it easier to get shots like this.
ISO 5000 | 2 seconds | F1.8 | 14mm

Over the past couple years I’ve developed a strong interest in wide-field astrophotography. Specifically, I’ve become passionate about photographing the aurora borealis, commonly known as the northern lights.

The aurora is Mother Nature’s own special effects show, and it’s one of those things that makes you stop to just appreciate the magic of the universe. No photo, IMAX screen, or VR headset will ever replicate the experience of standing under the sky when she flips on the light switch, but maybe that’s why I’m so drawn to aurora photography in the first place: it requires me to go to where I can experience the magic in person.

There are a lot of good lenses out there for this purpose, and I’ve used quite a few of them including the legendary Nikon 14-24mm F2.8, the Rokinon 14mm F2.8, the Venus Optics Laowa 15mm F2, various 16-35mm F2.8 variants, and even Sigma’s own 20mm F1.4 Art, but once I tried the Sigma 14mm F1.8 it was game over. I knew I had found the one.

ISO 1600 | 3.2 seconds | F1.8 | 14mm

One thing you learn quickly when shooting aurora is that you need fast, wide lenses. Fast because you’re shooting at night (duh). Wide because the aurora typically covers a large portion of the sky. It also makes it easier to include some landscape to provide a sense of place. This is where the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens comes in.

What makes this lens so special is the fast F1.8 aperture. That’s 1.3 EV faster than an F2.8 lens. Put another way, wide open the Sigma 14mm has a 2.5x light gathering advantage over F2.8 lenses. That’s huge.

One challenge when photographing the aurora is that it can dance around surprisingly fast at times. Even at high ISO values an exposure may be on the order of several seconds, making it difficult to capture the intricate structure you often see in person. That’s part of the reason time-lapse sequences never look as good as the real thing.

ISO 3200 | 5 seconds | F12.8 | 14mm

Using the Sigma 14mm, however, I can cut my exposure time significantly. Where the Nikon 14-24mm F2.8 might require a 6 second exposure, the Sigma lets me get away with 2.5 seconds. Still not enough to freeze the action, but enough to reduce the degree to which patterns and structure in the aurora get averaged out.

Conversely, there are times when the aurora moves slowly and I’m not too concerned about shutter speed. In that case, I can lower my ISO significantly, say from 6400 to 2500, in order to get higher quality images.

But wait, there’s more! This lens even makes it easier to focus in the dark. I typically use live view to focus on a bright star. Sounds easy, but sometimes it’s not. The extra light at F1.8 makes this easier, making shooting more fun.

Blah, blah, blah… That all means squat if the photos don’t look good. Thankfully, this lens has great image quality.

ISO 6400 | 1.3 seconds | F1.8 | 14mm

Wide open there’s some comatic aberration, which causes point sources of light near the edge of the frame to look distorted, but unless your viewer is pixel-peeping they probably won’t see it. I suppose if I were an astro purist, and the stars were the main subject of my photos, I might get a bit persnickety about this, but I’m not, so I don’t.

There’s also noticeable vignetting wide open, but it’s a smooth transition to the edges, and I’ve generally been able to correct for it effectively in Lightroom. Again, astro purists will probably cringe at this, but for aurora photos it works great.

If there’s any significant downside to this lens, it’s that it’s both big and heavy. This is one place where Sigma’s ‘Make the best optic possible and size be damned’ design approach is visible. Put a couple of these in your pack and you’re going to feel it. (Then again, some of those other lenses I mentioned above are pretty big as well.)

I’m looking forward to doing a lot more aurora photography in the future, and I’ll be doing much of it with this lens. It’s going to take a lot to displace it from my camera, which is why it’s my 2017 gear of the year.

Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art sample galleries

Sample gallery

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Astrophotography sample gallery

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Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma can install a rear-mounted filter holder on your Canon 14mm F1.8 Art lens

12 Sep

Lens manufacturer Sigma has announced an interesting new service: users of the company’s Canon mount 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art lens can now pay the company to fit a rear mount filter holder onto their lens. The FHR-11 filter holder is designed to allow gel filters to be held over the rear element of the lens so photographers can enjoy “more freedom of expression.”

Those who want to fit the holder themselves can buy it without the installation service, but keep in mind that damage caused by erroneous fitting will not be covered by the lens’ warranty. Sigma says the time the fitting will take depends on local services, but in Japan users are being told to expect the lens to be away for a week.

In the UK, the FHR-11 on its own costs £35 (~$ 45 USD), while the filter+install service costs £60 (~$ 80 USD). Sigma USA has yet to release official US pricing. For more information see the Sigma website.

Press Release

Chargeable service for installing the Rear Filter Holder FHR-11 on SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art for Canon

The Sigma Corporation is pleased to announce a chargeable service for installing the Rear Filter Holder FHR-11 on the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art for Canon.

From September onwards, Sigma will be able to install the Rear Filter Holder FHR-11 on SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art for Canon.

The Rear Filter Holder FHR-11 is an accessory exclusively designed for the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art for Canon, and it enables photographers to use a filter sheet with the lens.

By attaching it to the rear of the lens, it will allow more freedom of expression.

The Rear Filter Holder FHR-11 will be available in the UK towards the end of September for a Suggested Retail Price of £34.99 including VAT. The Rear Filter Holder FHR-11 and installation service by Sigma Imaging UK Ltd is £59.99 including VAT.

Please contact Sigma Imaging (UK) Ltd for further information. Customers who do not own the appropriate tools or who do not feel confident in attaching the filter holder themselves may take advantage of the chargeable installation service.

PACKAGE CONTENTS
1. Rear Filter Holder FHR-11
2. Guide template
3. Fixing screws (3 pieces)
UPC Code: 0085126 934866

  • Any damage or faults caused by attaching the filter holder on your own will not be covered by the warranty.
  • This product is exclusive to the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art 017 (CANON Mount).
  • Please do not attempt to attach it to any other lens or mount. There is a risk that it may cause damage to the lens and camera.
  • Please be careful to avoid scratches to the lens or the electrical contacts when attaching the filter holder.
  • Please ensure not to drop the small fixing screws inside the lens.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sample gallery: Around town with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art

25 Jul

The Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art is a truly unique lens. Offering the widest aperture of any lens that bears the same focal length, it is very sharp, produces beautiful sunstars, and offers almost uncanny subject isolation given its ultra-wide field of view. In other words, it’s capable of imagery that no other lens on the market can produce. Check out our sample gallery to see for yourself.

See our Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art
sample gallery

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Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma announces pricing and availability of 14mm and 135mm T2 Cine Prime lenses

14 Jul
The 14mm T2.0 will cost $ 4999 when it starts shipping later this month. The 135mm T2.0 will also ship in late July, for the same price.

Sigma has announced pricing and availability for its new Cine Prime lenses. The 14mm and 135mm T2 primes will be available later this month for $ 4999 each, or as part of two and seven-lens kits for $ 10,499 and $ 24,799 respectively.

Press Release:

Sigma Announces Pricing and Availability for the 14mm and 135mm T2 Cine Prime Lenses, Shipping This July

Full-frame sensor compatible, high-speed prime lenses bring Sigma’s esteemed Art lens technology to cinema cameras; the 14mm T2 FF and 135mm T2 FF begin shipping late July for a retail price of $ 4,999.00 USD each

Ronkonkoma, NY – July 13, 2017 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading still photo and cinema lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, today announced the availability of two brand new cine lenses: the Sigma 14mm T2 FF and 135mm T2 FF, which will both begin shipping late July 2017. Compatible with full-frame image sensors, these high-speed cine prime lenses are available for EF, E and PL mounts. They are available as individual lenses for a retail price of $ 4,999.00 USD each, or as part of two and seven lens sets for retail prices of $ 10,499.00 USD and $ 24,799.00 USD respectively.

Go fast and wide with the Sigma 14mm T2 Cine Prime
The Sigma 14mm T2 FF Cine Prime lens is the world’s first and only to offer an incredibly fast T2 at this ultra-wide angle focal length for full frame sensors. Bringing remarkable optical performance to the art of capturing moving images, the Sigma 14mm T2 offers cinematographers the opportunity for robust cinematic expression.

Resolving power like nothing ever seen before with the Sigma 135mm T2 Cine Prime
The Sigma 135mm T2 FF Cine Prime offers astonishing rendering performance unmatched by almost any lens on the market. Retaining the optical performance of Sigma’s original Art lens for the still photographer, this exceptional lens enables cinematographers to enjoy the highest image quality for shooting movies.

Both lenses offer the following benefits and capabilities:

  • Bright, T2 full frame maximum aperture
  • Capable of resolving up to 8K
  • Available in Canon EF, Sony E & PL Mounts
  • 180-degree focus rotation

The Sigma 14mm and 135mm lenses are fully compatible with full frame sensors. The addition of these lenses to the Sigma cine lineup expands the FF High Speed Prime Line to a total of seven lenses, from a super-wide 14mm to a brilliantly sharp telephoto 135mm.

Pricing for individual lenses and lens sets
The newest cine lens offerings from Sigma will be available individually as well as in sets for the following retail prices.

Individual lenses:
Sigma 14mm T2 FF – $ 4,999.00 USD
Sigma 135mm T2 FF – $ 4,999.00 USD

Two lens set with case:
Sigma 14mm T2 FF, 135mm T2 FF and a protective lens carrying case – $ 10,499.00 USD

Seven lens set with two cases:
Sigma 14mm T2 FF, 20mm T1.5 FF, 24mm T1.5 FF, 35mm T1.5 FF, 50mm T1.5 FF, 85mm T1.5 FF, 135mm T2 FF, and two protective lens carrying cases – $ 24,799.00 USD

The Sigma 14mm T2 FF and 135mm T2 FF Shipping Late July
The Cine 14mm and 135mm lenses and sets will begin shipping late July 2017 for EF, E and PL mounts.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Pricing for Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM and 24-70 F2.8 DG OS HSM Art lenses announced, undercuts the competition

24 Jun

Announced in February, two highly anticipated full-frame lenses from Sigma are finally on their way to consumers. Sigma has also announced pricing – the 14mm F1.8 DG HSM will cost $ 1600; the 24-70mm F2.8 Art will cost $ 1300. In both cases, that’s well below the current asking prices for Canon and Nikon versions of similar lenses.

Sigma says the 14mm in Canon and Sigma mount will ship this month, and the Nikon version will be available in July. The 24-70mm will ship for all three mounts this month. Considering there’s not much time left in June, that’s basically now.

Press release

Sigma Begins Shipping Its 14mm F1.8 DG HSM and 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art Lenses

The world’s first and only F1.8 ultra wide-angle full-frame lens for DSLR cameras is available now for $ 1,599.00 USD; the new Sigma Global Vision workhorse zoom lens is available now for $ 1,299.00 USD

Ronkonkoma, NY – June 22, 2017 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading still photo and cinema lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, announced today the pricing and availability for its new Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM and Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art lenses from its lauded Global Vision line. The ultra-wide angle full-frame 14mm F1.8 Art lens begins shipping in June 2017 for Canon and Sigma camera systems and in July 2017 for Nikon camera systems, for a retail price of $ 1,599.00 USD. The standard zoom full-frame 24-70mm F2.8 Art lens begins shipping in June 2017 for a retail price of $ 1,299 USD.

The Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art, which is the first and only F1.8 ultra wide-angle lens among interchangeable lenses for digital SLRs*, incorporates the same aspherical element as Sigma’s critically acclaimed 12-24mm F4 Art, allowing the lens to deliver a new dimension of visual experience. Boasting outstanding image quality from center to edge, the 14mm F1.8 Art features an 80mm front lens — the world’s largest glass aspherical lens in the industry, offering photographers an ultra-wide prime with virtually no distortion, flare or ghosting. Equipped with a superfast and efficient autofocus system, three FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) elements, and four SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements to reduce chromatic aberration and coma flare, the 14mm F1.8 Art is suitable for a wide range of photographic needs including astrophotography, architecture and landscape photography.

The 24-70mm F2.8 Art lens, Sigma’s new workhorse standard zoom lens, touts a brand new Optical Stabilizer (OS), Hypersonic Motor (HSM) for highly efficient and fast autofocus, as well as a dust- and splash-proof mount with rubber sealing. The 24-70mm F2.8 Art lens embodies all the technical qualities and finesse that define the high-performance Sigma Global Vision Art series. A popular industry focal range covering a wide array of shooting scenarios, the 24-70mm’s optical design also includes three SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass elements and four aspherical elements to ensure image accuracy and sharpness. The 24-70mm F2.8 Art aspherical elements use Sigma’s thicker center glass design and highly precise polishing process, delivering stunning images and bokeh effects. The lens’ purpose-built structure boasts a new metal barrel for optimal durability with TSC composite internal moving components designed to resist thermal contraction and expansion.

Both the 14mm F1.8 DG HSM and the 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art lenses are available in Canon, Nikon and Sigma mounts. The Sigma and Canon mount lenses work with Sigma’s MC-11 Sony E-mount converter. The Nikon mounts feature the brand new electromagnetic diaphragm.

Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens Features and Benefits:

> Sharp, rich image quality

  • Minimized chromatic aberrations: Three FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) glass elements and four SLD (Super Low Dispersion) glass elements help reduce transverse chromatic aberration, which tends to be noticeable in shots taken with ultra wide-angle lenses. The result is outstanding image quality from the center of the image to the edges.
  • Distinctive bokeh effect: Even at the 14mm ultra wide-angle of view, F1.8 brightness makes possible a very shallow depth of field with the subject standing out dramatically against a pleasingly softened background. It’s the unique mode of expression that only a large-diameter lens can deliver.
  • Minimized distortion: Serving as the front lens element, the large 80mm precision-molded glass aspherical lens effectively minimizes distortion. Offering excellent peripheral brightness, this lens delivers outstanding image quality from the center to the edges.

> Offers full-frame coverage

Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM OS Art Lens Features and Benefits:

> Superior optical performance

  • Optimal image quality for ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs: This lens offers top performance from the center to the edges of the image thanks to the optical system minimizing coma, which causes points of light to streak, and transverse chromatic aberration, which cannot be corrected via aperture control. The optical system also minimizes distortion, which can be particularly evident in wide-angle shots, resulting in excellent optical performance throughout the zoom range.
  • Expressive bokeh effect every time: At wide-open aperture, this lens offers outstanding photographic expression. The area in focus is extremely sharp, while the background exhibits a beautiful, creamy bokeh effect with only slight spherical aberration. Since large-diameter zoom lenses are often used at wide-open aperture, Sigma has paid close attention to the shape of the bokeh, aiming for artistic circularity.
  • Aspherical Lens Processing Technology: The Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art incorporates an aspherical lens element that helps achieve extremely high resolution. This element is much thicker at the center than the edges, and forming its unusual shape is a feat of manufacturing technology. Moreover, Sigma processes the surface of this aspherical lens element with ultra-precise tolerances that are measured in hundredths of a micrometer. This extremely fine surface allows the Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art to deliver a very natural and smooth bokeh effect, without the visible concentric rings that afflict typical aspherical lens elements.

> Fast and nimble autofocus photography

  • Designed for advanced utility in a wide variety of situations, the optical stabilizer (OS) offers a powerful stabilization effect. The newly designed large hypersonic motor (HSM) offers 1.3 times the torque of its predecessor for exceptionally stable performance.

Sigma Global Vision Line Features & Benefits:

  • Each lens is eligible for user customizable micro-focus and in-home firmware updates with the optional USB Dock and Sigma Optimization Pro software.
  • Each unit is crafted in Aizu, Japan and individually tested for QC and optical performance with the exclusive A1 MTF device.
  • Sigma’s Exclusive Mount Conversion Service allows lenses to be switched between any released mounts (fee-based).
  • Compatible with Sigma Mount Converter MC-11, allowing use of Sigma lenses in Sigma and Canon mounts with the Sony E-mount camera systems.

*As of February 2017

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma announces 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 Cine Prime lenses

21 Apr
Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2

Just in time for NAB, Sigma has announced an expansion to its Cine Prime line of lenses, adding the Cine High Speed 14mm T2 and Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2.

The Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2 lenses are designed for use with full frame cameras, and join five existing prime lenses in Sigma’s Cine Prime product line. With the addition of these lenses, Sigma now offers cine prime lenses covering a very useful focal length range of 14mm to 135mm.

As with the other lenses in the set, both new lenses are available PL-mount, EF-mount, and E-mount.

Sigma Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2

In addition to the lenses, Sigma is now offering customers the option to order their cine lenses in metric or imperial measurements, as well as standard or full luminous paint markings. Sigma says that existing customers can swap from one measurement system to another for a fee.

Finally, Sigma is now offering its mount conversion services for owners of its cine lenses, allowing users to switch lenses between EF- and E-mounts.

We’re planning to get some hands-on time with these lenses next week at NAB next week and will share our experience with you.

Press release:

NAB 2017: Sigma Unveils Two New Cine Prime Lenses; Adds New Product Options?

Sigma introduces brand new Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 Prime Lenses

April 20, 2017 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading DSLR lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, today announced its brand new Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 prime lenses and new Cine Prime and Zoom product options.

Sigma is expanding its Cine Prime line to include two brand new lenses: the Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and the Sigma Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2. The high-performance Sigma Cine Prime product line, which now includes the following focal lengths and apertures – 14mm T2, 20mm T1.5, 24mm T1.5, 35mm T1.5, 50mm T1.5, 85mm T1.5 and 135mm T2 – is compatible with the latest full-frame camera sensor technology. Compact in design, the Cine Prime line offers outstanding optical performance and is ready for higher resolution shooting (up to 6K-8K). Both the 14mm T2 and 135mm T2, along with the previously announced Sigma Cine Prime and Zoom lenses, will be available for test-shooting at the Sigma NAB booth C11525.

In addition to this expansion of its Cine Lens Prime line, Sigma is now offering customers the option to order Cine lenses in metric or imperial measurements as well as standard or full luminous paint on markings. Existing customers who wish to swap from one measurement system to the other can do so for a paid fee.

Also, Sigma is now offering its sought-after Mount Conversion Services for the Cine lens customers. The highly successful program ensures continued return on investment for customers, allowing them to convert their lenses to and from EF and E mounts.

You can read the full Sigma announcement including tech specs here as well as download the new Sigma Cine 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 product images here.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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