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Posts Tagged ‘135mm’

Why you should own a 135mm F2 lens

03 Jan

Image quality, weight and value for money. We have come to accept that most lenses are strong in only one or two of these three factors, that I personally focus on when researching lenses to buy. Sometimes though, we stumble upon a great lens design which is strong in all three. One of the prime examples of such a design is the “nifty fifty”—the 50mm F1.8 lens construction that many lens manufacturers provide. Another example is the 100mm (or sometimes 90mm) F2.8 macro lens. If you buy a nifty fifty or a 100mm macro lens you simply cannot go wrong—you will get a great and handy lens for your money, with great image quality.

Today I want to talk about another such lens design: The 135mm F2 lens. I use the word design, because although the available 135mm F2 lenses aren’t the exact same optical formula, they share many important traits. Perhaps you have seen the photos of masterful Russian portrait photographers such as Elena Shumilova or Anka Zhuravleva. They create a beautiful, mesmerizing dreamscape in their photos, and their secret weapon, besides an impeccable sense for aesthetics, is the 135mm F2 lens.

The moment I tried the Samyang 135mm F2 for the first time after purchasing it, I immediately felt that it was a very special lens. I took a few shots with the lens on my way home after buying it. I was blown away when I loaded the photos into my computer. I had of course heard that this lens is supposed to be very sharp, but I had never before had such a full blown “wow” experience when reviewing the sharpness of a lens.

The flawless image quality is only half the story though. Another thing that makes people go “wow” over the 135mm F2 lens design is the bokeh, which can be so creamy that distant backgrounds almost render as gradients. The 135mm F2 lens design is truly special, and in this article (and the video I made), I want to try to convince you as well.

Subject Separation

There are only a handful of foolproof strategies for making a great photograph. One of them is simplicity: A clear, simple subject that constitutes a shape, standing out and contrasting against a calm and simple background.

When you shoot a 135mm F2 lens at F2, your subject will stand out in this beautiful way, often without much work needed from you as the photographer. Just place your subject against a distant background, and half of the job is done. Even if the background is very close to your subject, somehow the optical construction in the 135mm lens will still manage to separate the background beautifully.

The Creamiest Bokeh

To achieve creamy bokeh, a lens should have a wide maximum aperture and a long focal length. One very popular lens for bokeh fiends is the Canon 85mm F1.2—it can produce extremely creamy out of focus backgrounds. But I would argue that a 135mm F2 lens produces even greater bokeh, thanks to the long focal length that compresses the background far more than the 85mm lens.

You would be hard pressed to find any other lens on a full frame camera that produces creamier bokeh. There are, of course, outliers—such as the legendary unicorn lens Canon EF 200mm F2—but that one isn’t a great alternative unless you are cool with spending $ 5,700 and carrying around something about as wieldy as a fire hydrant.

Unreal Sharpness

When I was on my way home after purchasing my first 135mm lens (the Samyang/Rokinon one) I took a few quick snapshots just to try out the lens. The first shot I ever took with this lens was of my neighbor’s cat, as it was sneaking around in a bush. When I got home and loaded the photo into Lightroom I was blown away by two things.

First of all, the background separation and the bokeh: I had photographed lots of animals in bushes before, but never before had I seen the bush melt away in the way it did with the 135mm lens.

Second of all, the incredible sharpness of the photo: I have owned many lenses, most of which I bought because they were supposed to have world-class sharpness, but the Samyang 135mm still stands out to me.

Never before (nor after) have I seen a lens with this level of sharpness wide open. Perhaps this impression of unreal sharpness is strengthened by the contrast to the extremely creamy bokeh you typically get in the same photo.

Close Focus Ability

Most of the available 135mm F2 lenses have a very short minimum focusing distance in relation to the focal length, creating a magnification ratio of around 0.2 – 0.25. This is great news if you like to photograph small things up close. These lenses go about as close as you could get without a dedicated macro lens.

Low Weight

Lenses with extreme sharpness and bokeh tend to be heavy. For example, the legendary Canon 85mm F1.2L weighs in at 1025g, and the Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art isn’t too light either at 1130g.

Sure, not all 135mm lenses are lightweight—Sigma’s new 135mm F1.8 is rather heavy at 1130g—but if you look at the Samyang 135mm F2, which is pretty much flawless optically, it weighs only 830g. And if you want autofocus, I would recommend the Canon 135mm f2.0L, which is incredibly light for its performance at just 750g.

Extreme value for the money

While there are certainly pricey 135mm F2 lenses out there (such as the aforementioned Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art, or the Carl Zeiss 135mm) there are a couple that give you extreme value for the money. When you buy a lens with fantastic sharpness and image quality at all apertures, you typically expect it to cost $ 1,200 on up. But like a glitch in the matrix, an anomaly that shouldn’t exist, you can get the Samyang/Rokinon 135mm for as little as $ 430 brand new. The only downside with that lens is that it is manual focus, which might not be suitable for photographing sports or children. Otherwise this lens is absolutely incredible.

If you want autofocus and great value for money, buy the Canon 135mm, as it has almost the image quality of the Samyang, and you can get it for under $ 1,000 new. The Canon is about as sharp as the Samyang, but it has some very slight chromatic aberration. I would recommend buying it used if you want to save some money, with the added benefit that you can re-sell it at the same price as you bought it for, effectively giving you the opportunity to “rent it” for free.

Which One to Buy?

If you want the best value possible for your money, and can survive without autofocus, buy the Samyang. If you must have autofocus, and care about weight, buy the Canon. If you want the best possible image quality, and you must have autofocus, and you don’t care if it is a bit heavy (maybe you need it for studio use), buy the Sigma. Include the Carl Zeiss in your research though, it might be an interesting lens for you, even if it is a bit pricey for what you get. If you are a Nikon user, of course have a look at the Nikon AF Nikkor 135mm f/2D DC and compare it to the other lenses mentioned in this article.

Whatever lens you pick in the end, you will make a great purchase. All of them are extremely sharp and produce mouth-watering bokeh, and all of them are reasonably priced for what you get. I have only owned my 135mm for less then a year, but already it is one of my top three most used and most fun lenses.


Micael Widell is a photography enthusiast based in Stockholm, Sweden. He loves photography, and runs a YouTube channel with tutorials, lens reviews and photography inspiration. You can also find him as @mwroll on Instagram and 500px.

This article was originally published on Micael’s blog, and is being republished in full with express permission.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Mitakon Speedmaster 135mm F1.4 lens relaunched with 7 mount options

16 Nov

Mitakon has relaunched its Speedmaster 135mm F1.4 lens, now offering it in 7 mount options: Sony A, Sony E, Canon EF, Nikon F, Fujifilm G, Pentax K, and Leica L (the listing says Leica T). This Mitakon lens features an F1.4 to F16 aperture alongside a clickless manual focusing ring, 1.6 meter minimum focusing distance, 11 elements in 5 groups (including three large extra-low dispersion elements), and a weight of 3kg / 6.6lbs.

Mitakon’s lens caught popular attention a couple years back as the world’s fastest 135mm lens. As with its original launch back in October 2015, the Speedmaster 135mm F1.4 lens is priced at $ 3,000. The lens is currently listed for pre-order through the Shotenkobo Online Store with a reservation price of ¥60,000 / $ 530 USD.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Hasselblad unveils 135mm F2.8 for X1D, promises 80mm with fastest aperture yet

04 Nov

Medium format camera and lens maker Hasselblad has released its XCD lens roadmap for 2018, revealing the nine total lenses that will be available for X1D-50c shooters by the end of next year. Mainly, the company has added two new models to the system in the shape of a 135mm F2.8 with a built-in teleconverter, and what it is describing as an 80mm with the widest aperture Hasselblad has ever produced.

In addition, Hasselblad has altered the spec of its already announced 22mm wide lens. It will now come to market as a 21mm F4 after a slight change of plan in what Hasselblad says is a response to feedback from customers.

The new XCD 135mm F2.8 is due to arrive in the first half of 2018, and will come with a built-in 1.7x converter that will transform the lens into a 230mm F4.8. With the sensor of the X1D, this lens will deliver the same sort of angle of view we’d expect from a 110mm lens on a full-frame system, while with the converter that becomes just over 180mm.

The maximum aperture of the promised 80mm hasn’t been disclosed, but if it is to be the widest aperture Hasselblad has ever produced it will need to be wider than the F2 of the 110mm Planar T*. The company has said more will be revealed closer to the launch date at the end of 2018.

Aperture details of the forthcoming XCD 35-75mm zoom and the XCD 65mm have also been released, with the zoom varying between F3.5 and F4.5, and the 50mm-equivalent focal length coming in at F2.8. Prices are also to be released at a later date.

For more information, visit the Hasselblad website.

Press Release

Hasselblad expands the XCD lens range to a total of nine lenses in 2018

Hasselblad updates the XCD lens roadmap for the award-winning X1D-50c with the XCD 135mm and the 80mm lenses, rapidly expanding the XCD lens range to a total of nine dedicated lenses. By end of 2018 X1D users will have a wide range of lens options to maximize their creative vision.

The XCD 135mm f/2.8 lens comes with a dedicated 1,7x converter that extends the tele lens to 230mm f/4.8, while the XCD 80mm is set to become the highest aperture lens that Hasselblad has ever introduced.

In addition to these two new lenses, the previously announced XCD 22mm ultra-wide-angle lens has been updated to 21mm to meet the Hasselblad users’ demand for a better wide-angle lens experience.

Like the other XCD lenses, all new XCD lenses have an integral central shutter offering a wide range of shutter speeds and full flash synchronisation up to 1/2000th second.

Hasselblad is also releasing aperture details for previously announced XCD lenses: the XCD 21 ultra-wide-angle lens will feature f/4.0, the XCD 35-75mm zoom lens will have f/3.5-4.5, and the XCD 65mm lens will have f/2.8.

All new XCD lenses, besides XCD 80mm, are expected to be available during the first half of 2018, while the XCD 80mm high aperture featuring lens is planned for the second half of 2018.

The demand for the previously announced XCD 120mm macro lens and the XH lens adapter exceeded Hasselblad’s expectations, but the production is now being ramped up and orders are being fulfilled globally.

In addition to the nine dedicated XCD lenses, the XH lens adapter allows the X1D owners to use all twelve HC/HCD lenses.

Pricing and additional technical specifications will be provided closer to the availability of each lens. Specifications are subject to change.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma announces pricing and availability of 14mm and 135mm T2 Cine Prime lenses

14 Jul
The 14mm T2.0 will cost $ 4999 when it starts shipping later this month. The 135mm T2.0 will also ship in late July, for the same price.

Sigma has announced pricing and availability for its new Cine Prime lenses. The 14mm and 135mm T2 primes will be available later this month for $ 4999 each, or as part of two and seven-lens kits for $ 10,499 and $ 24,799 respectively.

Press Release:

Sigma Announces Pricing and Availability for the 14mm and 135mm T2 Cine Prime Lenses, Shipping This July

Full-frame sensor compatible, high-speed prime lenses bring Sigma’s esteemed Art lens technology to cinema cameras; the 14mm T2 FF and 135mm T2 FF begin shipping late July for a retail price of $ 4,999.00 USD each

Ronkonkoma, NY – July 13, 2017 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading still photo and cinema lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, today announced the availability of two brand new cine lenses: the Sigma 14mm T2 FF and 135mm T2 FF, which will both begin shipping late July 2017. Compatible with full-frame image sensors, these high-speed cine prime lenses are available for EF, E and PL mounts. They are available as individual lenses for a retail price of $ 4,999.00 USD each, or as part of two and seven lens sets for retail prices of $ 10,499.00 USD and $ 24,799.00 USD respectively.

Go fast and wide with the Sigma 14mm T2 Cine Prime
The Sigma 14mm T2 FF Cine Prime lens is the world’s first and only to offer an incredibly fast T2 at this ultra-wide angle focal length for full frame sensors. Bringing remarkable optical performance to the art of capturing moving images, the Sigma 14mm T2 offers cinematographers the opportunity for robust cinematic expression.

Resolving power like nothing ever seen before with the Sigma 135mm T2 Cine Prime
The Sigma 135mm T2 FF Cine Prime offers astonishing rendering performance unmatched by almost any lens on the market. Retaining the optical performance of Sigma’s original Art lens for the still photographer, this exceptional lens enables cinematographers to enjoy the highest image quality for shooting movies.

Both lenses offer the following benefits and capabilities:

  • Bright, T2 full frame maximum aperture
  • Capable of resolving up to 8K
  • Available in Canon EF, Sony E & PL Mounts
  • 180-degree focus rotation

The Sigma 14mm and 135mm lenses are fully compatible with full frame sensors. The addition of these lenses to the Sigma cine lineup expands the FF High Speed Prime Line to a total of seven lenses, from a super-wide 14mm to a brilliantly sharp telephoto 135mm.

Pricing for individual lenses and lens sets
The newest cine lens offerings from Sigma will be available individually as well as in sets for the following retail prices.

Individual lenses:
Sigma 14mm T2 FF – $ 4,999.00 USD
Sigma 135mm T2 FF – $ 4,999.00 USD

Two lens set with case:
Sigma 14mm T2 FF, 135mm T2 FF and a protective lens carrying case – $ 10,499.00 USD

Seven lens set with two cases:
Sigma 14mm T2 FF, 20mm T1.5 FF, 24mm T1.5 FF, 35mm T1.5 FF, 50mm T1.5 FF, 85mm T1.5 FF, 135mm T2 FF, and two protective lens carrying cases – $ 24,799.00 USD

The Sigma 14mm T2 FF and 135mm T2 FF Shipping Late July
The Cine 14mm and 135mm lenses and sets will begin shipping late July 2017 for EF, E and PL mounts.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

22 Jun

In this quick review of the Sigma 135mm f1.8 Art Lens, I will go over some of its features and give you my overall impression of this lens.

Photographers like gear

I belong to several photography groups, both online as well as within my local area, and often times when we meet, we end up talking about our gear. Conversations typically revolve around the gear we have, what we would like to have, and what we want to sell off. On several occasions, I have heard my fellow photographers talk about the Sigma Art series of lenses. They always start the conversation with, “Oh, I absolutely love my Sigma Art lens. The bokeh is so dreamy!” Now, I am a Canon shooter – always have been and always will be. But that does not mean that every once in a while, I don’t like to test out gear from other companies to compare performance, specifications, and price.

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

The Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens comes with a case and a lens hood.

So when I had the opportunity to test out the Sigma 135mm 1.8 DG HSM Art lens, I jumped at the chance. I spent about three weeks with this lens and used it for a variety of photography assignments – both indoors and outdoors. Here is my review based on my personal experiences with this lens.

Technical Specifications

As per Sigma’s website, the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art is a medium range telephoto prime lens designed for modern high-megapixel DSLRs. A new large Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM) delivers ample torque to the focusing group for outstanding speed, ensuring exceptionally stable performance even at lower speeds. This state-of-the-art prime lens touts a dust and splash proof mount for guaranteed performance in any condition and its large 1.8 aperture allows for more creative control over imagery.

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

The Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens attached to my Canon 1V film camera.

My telephoto lens of choice is my Canon EF 70-200L lens. It’s heavy and bulky but gives me some of the best picture quality in its class. Compared to that lens, the 135mm felt lightweight and comfortable to carry around all day. Being a fixed lens, there are no moving parts, unlike the zoom ring on the 70-200mm. While this meant that I had to move around to get shots at various distances, it was not an inconvenience. I just used pretended to have a zoom lens by moving my feet!

The lens looks very sharp and clean. The smooth matte black finish of the lens gives it a certain visual appeal. The build quality is very clean and it feels like a solid piece of glass. The lens is a little heavy (at about 2.56 pounds or 1.2 kg) but if you are used to walking around with other telephoto lenses, it’s not any different compared to using those.

Sharpness of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art Lens

The legendary quality of having the dreamiest bokeh is very true with this lens. It is super sharp even when shooting absolutely wide open. I typically shoot very wide opened with all my Canon L-lenses which fits my style of photography. The aperture of f/2.0 is my personal sweet spot – the one that I really trust to give me a shallow depth of field and dreamy bokeh (blurry background). This lens did not disappoint at my favorite f-stop.

But even at f/1.8 (the widest aperture on the Sigma 135mm), the lens was tack sharp with very shallow depth of field. Once it was stopped down to f/16, there was some softness on the edges of the frame but it’s not very prominent. With a lens of this quality, the best aperture would be between f/1.8 to f/4 (in my opinion) to get the best of the shallow depth of field and bokeh that we all love.

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

Shot at ISO 200, f/1.8 – wide open – look at that dreamy bokeh.

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

ISO 200 at f/2.0

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

ISO 200 at f/9 – more of the entire scene is clear and visible – with a wider (deeper) depth of field here.

Vignetting

The Sigma 135mm at f/1.8 Art Lens showed slight edge vignetting when shot wide open. But for my style of photography, it’s minimal and nothing I could not fix in post-processing. I was very impressed with the number of tack sharp images that I could keep even when I used the lens completely wide open at f/1.8.

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

The image above left was shot at ISO 200, f/2.0 and on the right, the same scene was shot at ISO 200, f/9. There is no visible softness or vignetting at either aperture. The bokeh at f/2.0 is so dreamy (shallow depth of field) and at f/9 more of the background is visible.

Autofocus

The Sigma 135mm has an electronic hypersonic motor. This makes the autofocus very fast and smooth. I found that the lens locked focus easily and did not hunt while focusing. The AF motor was also relatively quiet and smooth as compared to other telephoto lenses like the Canon 85mm f/1.2L II USM that is really slow while hunting for focus in the AF mode.

Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens

While hiking my two boys decided they would lead the pack. I really wanted to capture this independent streak and both images are shot less than 2 seconds apart. The Sigma 135mm had no problems tracking focus as they moved up the trail. Both images were shot at ISO 200, f/2.0 and both have the subjects tack sharp and in focus in spite of the movement.

Macro capabilities

While the Sigma 135mm is not described as a macro lens, it did offer 0.2x magnification with a minimum focusing distance of just under three feet. Since I have a dedicated macro lens that I use for my detail shots, I did not pay much attention to this feature. However, in a pinch, this lens could be used to provide some magnification.

Karthika Gupta Memorable Jaunts DPS Article - Sigma 135mm lens review-11

The 135mm zoom was a little tight when I had to take in-studio headshots but once I got the focus locked, it turned out beautifully. Both images were shot at f/2.0 ISO 640, 1/125th.

Summary

Overall I was really very impressed with the Sigma 135mm 1.8 DG HSM Art lens. It is a superbly built piece of gear that was incredibly fast, easy to carry, handle, and use.

The only thing I needed to get used to was the fact that it was a prime lens and not a zoom, unlike my favorite 70-200mm telephoto lens. This meant I had to move around to get shots at different angles and different focal lengths, but I don’t consider that a con. Instead, I feel that shooting with a prime lens makes you more careful and thoughtful about your compositions since you have to physically move around to get a diverse range of shots.

The Sigma 135mm lens is definitely something to look into if you are in the market for a good quality telephoto lens.

The post Quick Review of the Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art Lens by Karthika Gupta appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Imaging Resource publishes Sigma 135mm F1.8 gallery

03 May

Imaging Resource took a look at Sigma’s fast 135mm telephoto prime lens, calling it once of the sharpest lenses they’ve ever tested.

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Sigma announces 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 Cine Prime lenses

21 Apr
Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2

Just in time for NAB, Sigma has announced an expansion to its Cine Prime line of lenses, adding the Cine High Speed 14mm T2 and Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2.

The Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2 lenses are designed for use with full frame cameras, and join five existing prime lenses in Sigma’s Cine Prime product line. With the addition of these lenses, Sigma now offers cine prime lenses covering a very useful focal length range of 14mm to 135mm.

As with the other lenses in the set, both new lenses are available PL-mount, EF-mount, and E-mount.

Sigma Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2

In addition to the lenses, Sigma is now offering customers the option to order their cine lenses in metric or imperial measurements, as well as standard or full luminous paint markings. Sigma says that existing customers can swap from one measurement system to another for a fee.

Finally, Sigma is now offering its mount conversion services for owners of its cine lenses, allowing users to switch lenses between EF- and E-mounts.

We’re planning to get some hands-on time with these lenses next week at NAB next week and will share our experience with you.

Press release:

NAB 2017: Sigma Unveils Two New Cine Prime Lenses; Adds New Product Options?

Sigma introduces brand new Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 Prime Lenses

April 20, 2017 – Sigma Corporation of America, a leading DSLR lens, camera, flash and accessory manufacturer, today announced its brand new Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 prime lenses and new Cine Prime and Zoom product options.

Sigma is expanding its Cine Prime line to include two brand new lenses: the Sigma Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and the Sigma Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2. The high-performance Sigma Cine Prime product line, which now includes the following focal lengths and apertures – 14mm T2, 20mm T1.5, 24mm T1.5, 35mm T1.5, 50mm T1.5, 85mm T1.5 and 135mm T2 – is compatible with the latest full-frame camera sensor technology. Compact in design, the Cine Prime line offers outstanding optical performance and is ready for higher resolution shooting (up to 6K-8K). Both the 14mm T2 and 135mm T2, along with the previously announced Sigma Cine Prime and Zoom lenses, will be available for test-shooting at the Sigma NAB booth C11525.

In addition to this expansion of its Cine Lens Prime line, Sigma is now offering customers the option to order Cine lenses in metric or imperial measurements as well as standard or full luminous paint on markings. Existing customers who wish to swap from one measurement system to the other can do so for a paid fee.

Also, Sigma is now offering its sought-after Mount Conversion Services for the Cine lens customers. The highly successful program ensures continued return on investment for customers, allowing them to convert their lenses to and from EF and E mounts.

You can read the full Sigma announcement including tech specs here as well as download the new Sigma Cine 14mm T2 and 135mm T2 product images here.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Zeiss formally announces Batis 135mm F2.8

06 Apr

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Zeiss has announced a new medium telephoto full-frame Batis lens for Sony E mount: the Batis 2.8/135. The Apo Sonnar optical design comprises of 14 elements in 11 groups inside a smooth metal body with an OLED display with distance and depth of field information. As with all lenses in the Batis line, it offers AF, and a robust build with weather-sealing. It also features image stabilization, like the Batis 85mm.

The lens will be available in May 2017 with an MSRP of $ 1,999.

Press Release:

The new ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 is the first 135 mm AF focal length for mirrorless full-frame cameras from Sony

OBERKOCHEN/Germany, 05/04/2017.

Fans of Sony’s mirrorless full-frame cameras have a reason to smile: ZEISS has added a further tele lens focal length to its ZEISS Batis lens family. The new ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 is the first 135 mm AF focal length for Sony’s Alpha 7 system with E-mount. Like all lenses from the ZEISS Batis range, this new addition is equipped with fast and precise autofocus. To avoid shaking, which can occur very easily with tele lenses, an optical image stabilizer has also been incorporated into the design. The ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 proves it worth particularly in portrait photography: “The tele focal length means the subject can stand out nicely against the blurred background”, says Product Manager Michael Pollmann from ZEISS. “The bokeh works very well indeed, and the optical design – an Apo Sonnar – ensures outstanding images time and again.” The new ZEISS Batis could also be a great option for event and wedding photography.

“Compact, lightweight, top quality”

“The advantage of Sony’s mirrorless full-frame system is that despite its compact size, it delivers exceptional image quality,” says Pollmann. ZEISS has continued to bring the design of the ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 into line with the needs of Sony photographers. “It was important to build a comparably handy lens – in spite of the rather long focal length. We made a conscious decision to strike a balance between compactness, weight and light intensity.”

OLED display visualizes depth of focus

Like all ZEISS Batis lenses, this latest addition features an OLED display that enables precise visualization of the depth of field. So you can be sure that the image is in focus in all the right places. The metal housing gives the lens its robust and durable character. ZEISS assures us that its dust and dirt shield means photo shoots in poor weather are a walk in the park.

The image quality leaves nothing to be desired: “We have put a lot of effort into the optical design and into correcting our lenses,” says Pollmann. “For example, we are experimenting with special types of glass in order to rule out as many kinds of image errors as possible. We have thus been able to ensure corrected chromatic aberration in the ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 so that we have virtually no image errors.” 14 lenses have been built into 11 groups in the camera lens.

Price and availability

The ZEISS Batis 2.8/135 will be available from specialist dealers starting May 2017 and will retail at 1,999 euros incl. 19 percent sales tax (RRP).

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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The ‘Crapinon’ is a 135mm lens made from discarded parts

04 Apr

You know what they say about one man’s trash. Well, lens enthusiast and freelance video producer Mathieu Stern took the phrase to heart when he found an old lens tube at his local flea market. It was in a box of unsold items destined for the trash when he rescued it and gave it a new life. With the addition of an ND M42 to NEX adapter, M42 tubes and a couple of rubber bands, the ‘Crapinon 135mm’ was born. 

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Stern admits that the lens isn’t too sharp, as you’d expect, but it does work. See some of his sample images above. You can see more of his work at his YouTube channel and his website.

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art Sample Gallery

03 Apr

Recently the new Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art landed in the office, prompting us to get out there and shoot some portraits… from a distance. While one of their heavier primes, performance is exceptional wide-open with very quick focusing. What about that background blur? Take a look at our samples to find out.

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