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Archive for January, 2015

37 Ethereal Almost Supernatural Long Exposure Photographs

30 Jan

Landscape photographers use a technique involving long exposures to create those milky smooth waterfalls, and misty images of coastlines. But what other ways are long exposures used?

Here are a few long exposure photographs that seem almost otherworldly or supernatural in their appearance for you to ponder and enjoy:

Photograph Smoking Jungle by Karim Nafatni on 500px

Smoking Jungle by Karim Nafatni on 500px

Photograph Snake on a Train by Brian Donovan on 500px

Snake on a Train by Brian Donovan on 500px

Photograph Skipping Rocks by Michael Shainblum on 500px

Skipping Rocks by Michael Shainblum on 500px

Photograph Autumn Swirl by Andrew Kumler on 500px

Autumn Swirl by Andrew Kumler on 500px

Photograph 49 Shades of Grey by Dylan Toh  & Marianne Lim on 500px

49 Shades of Grey by Dylan Toh & Marianne Lim on 500px

Photograph The Proposal by Ryan Buchanan on 500px

The Proposal by Ryan Buchanan on 500px

Photograph Children of the Atom by WK Cheoh on 500px

Children of the Atom by WK Cheoh on 500px

Photograph Stars over Teton homestead by Royce's NightScapes on 500px

Stars over Teton homestead by Royce’s NightScapes on 500px

Photograph Cascading Levels by Jason Hatfield on 500px

Cascading Levels by Jason Hatfield on 500px

Photograph Beach Morning by Mobeen Mazhar on 500px

Beach Morning by Mobeen Mazhar on 500px

Photograph Timeless by Stefan Mitterwallner on 500px

Timeless by Stefan Mitterwallner on 500px

Photograph Erosion of an Iceberg by André Alessio on 500px

Erosion of an Iceberg by André Alessio on 500px

Photograph Trollstigen light trail by Attila Roszjár on 500px

Trollstigen light trail by Attila Roszjár on 500px

Photograph Forever Strong by Max Rive on 500px

Forever Strong by Max Rive on 500px

Photograph Machu Picchu by Jacky CW on 500px

Machu Picchu by Jacky CW on 500px

Photograph Onshore by Dave Cox on 500px

Onshore by Dave Cox on 500px

Photograph Long WayTo Sun by Mostafa Ammar on 500px

Long WayTo Sun by Mostafa Ammar on 500px

Photograph Persistence - Blue Boat Shed, Perth. Western Australia by Luke Austin on 500px

Persistence – Blue Boat Shed, Perth. Western Australia by Luke Austin on 500px

Photograph Colosseum Lite Trails by Yhun Suarez on 500px

Colosseum Lite Trails by Yhun Suarez on 500px

Photograph Startrails by Kittikorn Nimitpara on 500px

Startrails by Kittikorn Nimitpara on 500px

Photograph Time by David Watson on 500px

Time by David Watson on 500px

Photograph Grand Central by Conor MacNeill on 500px

Grand Central by Conor MacNeill on 500px

Note: long exposures of busy places full of people can help make all the people disappear magically!

Photograph Dubai 2014 Happy New year by Dalia Al Ameen on 500px

Dubai 2014 Happy New year by Dalia Al Ameen on 500px

Photograph Viva sant'Agata! by Giuseppe Torre on 500px

Viva sant’Agata! by Giuseppe Torre on 500px

Photograph SkyWheel in Niagara Falls, Canada by Roberto Machado Noa on 500px

SkyWheel in Niagara Falls, Canada by Roberto Machado Noa on 500px

Photograph Carnival by Photo Bones on 500px

Carnival by Photo Bones on 500px

Photograph C A R N I E by Matthew James on 500px

C A R N I E by Matthew James on 500px

Photograph L I G H T | S P I N by Matthew James on 500px

L I G H T | S P I N by Matthew James on 500px

Photograph Spinning by Benjamin King on 500px

Spinning by Benjamin King on 500px

Photograph fountain of fire by Zachary Voo on 500px

fountain of fire by Zachary Voo on 500px

Photograph The Spin by Bipphy Kath on 500px

The Spin by Bipphy Kath on 500px

Photograph Fire show amazing at night by Sasin Tipchai on 500px

Fire show amazing at night by Sasin Tipchai on 500px

Photograph Insane Crazy by Ben Hirst on 500px

Insane Crazy by Ben Hirst on 500px

Photograph Flurry II. by Christopher Chung on 500px

Flurry II. by Christopher Chung on 500px

Photograph THE WINDMILLS OF YOUR MIND, LES MOULINS DE MON COEUR... by Magda Indigo on 500px

THE WINDMILLS OF YOUR MIND, LES MOULINS DE MON COEUR… by Magda Indigo on 500px

Photograph Tunnel of Fire by Luc De La Mare on 500px

Tunnel of Fire by Luc De La Mare on 500px

Photograph The Tunnel by Dave Brightwell on 500px

The Tunnel by Dave Brightwell on 500px

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The post 37 Ethereal Almost Supernatural Long Exposure Photographs by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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The Contest Winners of the Three Tamron Lenses Are…

30 Jan

Tamron Lenses for Front Contest Graphic

A VERY BIG Thank You to everyone who entered our recent competition to win one of three lenses from our friends and site sponsors at Tamron.

Lens A and Lens B

Tamron 16-300mm Di II VC PZD Macro and Tamron SP 70-300mm Di VC USD

This was not actually a photography competition, per se, but so many of you shared your beautiful photographs, we encourage you all to go back and scroll the comments section for some wonderful photographs and links to reader pages/sites.

The response was absolutely AMAZING with over 1,000 entries! In fact, it was so great that we here at Digital Photography School decided, again, to add a new category of winners – Honorable Mentions – and provide each Honoree with a dPS eBook of their choice. But now… onto the winners!

Here are the 3 winners of the competition:

  • The Tamron 16-300mm Di II VC PZD Macro goes to – Vera Irwin!
  • The Tamron SP 70-300mm Di VC USD goes to – Wayne Ellyson!
  • The 2nd Tamron SP 70-300mm Di VC USD goes to – Christopher Sperry!

A note to each of our winners:

  • Vera, VERY creative! Was a pleasure to read!
  • Wayne, enjoy all your Tamron lenses and we hope the new lens does the trick at all of the upcoming festivals.
  • Christopher, enjoy Morocco!

Ohhh, and James Garcia – We think that these are FREAKING COOL as well! Rudy, your Tamron/dPS 12 Days of Christmas song was truly inspired. Thank you for that!

Honorable Mentions:

Keith Starkey, D90Rich, Amanda Evans, 6YuQk5Ngnz, Jodi O’Neill, Aaron, Paul Kidero, Crystal, Sarah Williams, Penny Katz, A.Stone, Dustin White, Andy Cunnington, Kim Manzoni, and Sachi Sakai.

We were all thrilled with the entries… you tugged at our heartstrings, made us laugh, made us smile, but most importantly, you made us keep wanting to do more of what we are doing; providing you quality information and guidance to become a better photographer. We were so pleased to see that you came from every part of the world, young adults to grandparents, and everyone in between. Thank you all for your entries!

Tamron Nightime eBook Graphic

Now, for those of you that didn’t win, Tamron has invited ALL dPS readers to download their eBook series!

You can find those HERE!

Tamron  Winter Savings Rebates

For all of you residing in the USA, when you do purchase your next select Tamron Lens, please make sure to take advantage of Tamron Rebates*. Find additional information HERE!

*Current rebate offers end February 28, 2015. US RESIDENTS ONLY.

Winners will be emailed with details of how to collect their prize. Please make sure to look for our email. Thanks you again for all the wonderful submissions and to Tamron for sponsoring this competition.

Tamron logo

About Tamron

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The post The Contest Winners of the Three Tamron Lenses Are… by Darren Rowse appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Food Photography – How to Shoot A Beverage With Only Two Lights

30 Jan

The wonderful thing about food photography is that you can easily turn your apartment, home, or garage into a studio. This image was shot for a local ice cream franchise that offers a different spin on the traditional root beer float. The set was constructed on a coffee table with common household items, and was lit with just two lights.

Final image with real ice cream

Final image

You might be thinking that the featured photo does not look like your normal, every-day root beer float, and you would be right. The ice cream pellets in the float were created by flash freezing ice cream mixed with liquid nitrogen.

Because the ice cream was made up of these small pellets, it melted quickly, leaving little time to get the “money shot”. To solve this problem, I created a stand-in cup that was filled with soda and mini marshmallows. This stand-in allowed me to tweak my lights while the ice cream was safely stored in an ice chest filled with dry ice.

Marshmallow stand-in

Marshmallows used as stand-in for ice cream, during set up phase.

Two pieces of white poster board were used to construct the set. One for the floor and one for the background. The background piece was attached to sections of PVC tubing, which were re-purposed from homemade DIY light panel frames. Small one pound dumbbells were placed on top of the PVC frame to secure it and keep it from moving around.

Whenever you photograph beverages, it is important to backlight them in order to show the transparency of the container and/or liquid. That is what makes soda, iced tea and beer ads look so delicious.

For this shot, I decided to achieve the effect by creating a really tiny pseudo-softbox behind the glass of root beer. I started by cutting a rectangular hole in the back of the poster board. Careful attention was taken to insure that the hole was large enough to cover the entire lower portion of the glass, while still being hidden from the camera’s view.

A small off-camera flash fitted with a radio trigger was then placed behind the background. Since the hole and glass were tall and narrow, the strobe was placed on its side, to match.

View from behind background

View of PVC frame and hotshoe flash with radio receiver. Notice how flash is placed on its side, vertically.

Next, a small sheet of frosted stencil paper purchased from a local hobby store was placed in front of the hole, to evenly diffuse the light across the opening. The translucent properties of the paper also created a soft falloff to the background, as if it were being lit from the front instead of the back.

frosted stencil paper

Frosted stencil paper was butted against the background, behind the glass, to evenly diffuse the light shining through the hole in the poster board. The sheet was moved so that the edges, logo and holes were not seen from the camera’s angle of view.

backlit root beer

First backlight test, before marshmallows were added.

Now that the liquid was backlit, we needed to add a light to illuminate the ice cream. To do this, a large piece of diffusion fabric attached to a PVC frame was placed just out of frame, towards camera left. A strobe light was then placed behind the panel. The diffusion fabric created a large source of illumination, which created a very soft transition from the highlights to the shadows.

float without backlight

Light shining through diffusion panel with back light turned off

Finally, an acrylic mirror was attached to a light stand and placed just out of frame, towards camera right. The mirror reflected and bounced some of the light from the large panel back into the shadows.

Before and After of Mirror Fill

Mirror fill: Before and After

setup view

View of entire setup.

The final image was shot using a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro lens. The camera was set to f/14 at ISO 100.

Final image with real ice cream

Final image using real ice cream.

With a little imagination and ingenuity you too can create professional looking food images on a budget, with minimal equipment. In fact, here are a few cheaper alternatives that could have been used to create the image above:

CFL or LED Light Bulbs

The wonderful thing about still photography is that your subject is “still”. This means you can use regular household bulbs to light your scene if you do not have the money for strobes. All you have to do is lower and adjust the shutter speed of your camera, since the bulbs do not emit as much light as a strobe or off-camera flash. Experiment with different bulb wattages, or try alternating the amount of bulbs to create different lighting ratios. Just make sure you have the bulbs placed behind some source of diffusion. By diffusing the lights, you will create a single large light source; otherwise, you will create multiple shadows and weird reflections from the various sources of light.

White Twin Bed Sheet

A white bed sheet is an inexpensive and great form of diffusion. You can attach it to a PVC frame or stretch it between two light stands using spring clamps. The sheets are also great for portrait work. Need a GIANT softbox? Try a king size sheet!

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The post Food Photography – How to Shoot A Beverage With Only Two Lights by Joel Dryer appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Symbiosen

30 Jan

© unbenannt_Luca Galavotti

Der italienische Fotograf Luca Galavotti beschäftigt sich in seiner Fotografie hauptsächlich mit Landschaften sowie von Mensch erschaffenen Orten und deren Wechselwirkung.

Sein Interesse für Architektur verfestigte er in einem Architekturstudium. Später wechselte er jedoch zum Fach Kommunikationsdesign, da ihn seine Leidenschaft, die Fotografie, nicht losließ. Er ist jedoch davon überzeugt, dass es keiner Schule bedarf, um fotografieren zu lernen. Kein Kurs kann Dir Sensibilität und Neugier beibringen und für die praktischen Fertigkeiten bedarf es Zeit, so Galavotti.

Heute lebt und arbeitet er als freiberuflicher Fotograf in Emilia, Italien und reist gern und viel. Während dieser Reisen entstehen viele seiner hier zu sehenden Fotografien. Hauptsächlich arbeitet er mit analogen Kameras und präferiert für Landschaften Farb- und für Portraitaufnahmen Schwarzweißfilme. Zu seinen Architektur- und Landschaftsaufnahmen sagt er:

Ich mag die Idee, Plätze, die ständig im Wandel sind, in einen Augenblick einzufrieren. Einen Fotowiderspruch zu erzeugen. Insbesondere die Nicht-Orte habe meine Aufmerksamkeit, Räume geschaffen durch Menschen, für Menschen, aber ohne Identität. Sie sind Ausdruck einer Form der absoluten Unsicherheit im Übergang. Jeder geht durch diese Orte, aber keiner lebt dort. Meine Fotografien wollen ihnen gewissermaßen eine Seele geben, den Moment des „Übergangs“ stoppen sowie die ständige und unaufhörliche Ungewissheit, die jetzt typisch ist für unsere Zeit.

Und dann habe ich Landschaftsaufnahmen: Ich sehe sie wie riesige Behälter, wie Schachteln, wie wechselnde Hintergründe, auf denen man sich bewegt und seine Spuren hinterlässt. Ich mag es, die Landschaft und ihren Einfluss auf die Menschen, die dort leben, zu studieren. Und umgekehrt, den Einfluss der Menschen auf die Landschaft, die sie umgibt. Wie diese beiden Faktoren manchmal so weit entfernt und manchmal doch so nah sein können und eine Symbiose ergeben.

Betonboden mit Meer.

Fotokabine vor großer Wand.

Wellenbrecher im Meer mit Möwen.

Blick auf eine große Wohnsiedlung zwischen Bäumen.

Haus mit der Aufschrift SOGNI

Weg, der in den Nebel führt.

Eine kleine Mauer am Strand.

Ein Jesushäuschen am Feldweg.

Ein schneebedecktes Feld mit kahlen Bäumen.

Absperrungen an einem Parkplatz.

Blick aus einem großen Fenster ins Meer.

Wer nun neugierig geworden ist, schaut am besten auf seiner Webseite, Flickr oder Facebook vorbei. Dort finden sich neben diesen Aufnahmen auch die anfangs kurz erwähnten Portraitaufnahmen, für die er sich ebenfalls viel Zeit nimmt, um das wahre Wesen einer Person zu erfassen.


kwerfeldein – Fotografie Magazin | Fotocommunity

 
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Posted in Equipment

 

Moment phone case brings two-stage shutter button to iPhone 6

30 Jan

Moment, a Seattle-based company that is known for its high-quality smartphone accessory lenses has launched a Kickstarter campaign for its latest product idea, the Moment case. The Moment case is a case for the Apple iPhone 6 that offers a two-stage shutter button, allowing you to half-press to lock focus and exposure. The connection to the phone is electronic without any mechanical components. The grip links to the iPhone via a low-energy bluetooth connection. Read more at connect.dpreview.com

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Canon offers EOS 5D Mark III and EOS-1D X firmware updates

30 Jan

Canon has released firmware updates for its EOS 5D Mark III and EOS-1D X DSLRs. Both updates claim to improve the user’s ability to control autofocus in Live View mode when wide angle lenses are used. Firmware 2.0.7 for the 1D-X also fixes a couple of issues, including a problem with vertical lines appearing when long exposures are used. Read more

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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Desert Cities: Modular Nodal Network Idea for the Middle East

30 Jan

[ By WebUrbanist in Architecture & Cities & Urbanism. ]

desert city social organization

A combination of contemporary regionalism and sustainable urbanism, this design strategy proposed by an Italian architecture firm involves a series of modules for living, working and interacting at different scales. Notably different from most models of urban design is the intentional lack of density, raising the question: is the premise that good urban strategies revolve around dense centers a universally valid one?

desert city expanse

desert city different scales

desert cities node network

Connected by lines that serve as both dividers and connectors, the smallest modules are family-sized units, the mid-sized variants working as cultural, research and service centers and the largest operating as micro-cities with more complex communities.

desert city concept rendering

desert city individual community

By spreading these out, maximum use can be made of minimal rainfall (water capture) as well as sun exposure (solar power), rendering each unit relatively or entirely self-sufficient. Internally, composing, recycling and other sustainable strategies would be employed as well.

desert city design urban

desert city layout strategy

desert city streets connectors

desert city angled view

Luca Curci Architects describes the approach as follows: “The project-plane is made by a series of identity-places with symbiotic interconnections among them which create an organic and articulated system. The identity-places can be divided in 3 macro architectural types, different for dimension, function and inhabitants. Each identity-place is developed following residential and architectural solutions which respect the environment’s tradition, climatic condition and resources.”

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[ By WebUrbanist in Architecture & Cities & Urbanism. ]

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DxO OpticsPro 10.2 adds support for Sony A7 II and Panasonic LX100

30 Jan

DxO OpticsPro 10.2 is now available, joined by DxO ViewPoint 2.5.2 and DxO FilmPack 5.1. With this trio of updates, photographers will find new support for four more camera models: the Lumix DMC-LX100, Pentax K-S1, Sony A7 II, and the Samsung Galaxy S5. Hundreds of new camera and lens combinations have been added, the user interfaces have been improved, and more. Read more

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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11 Tips for Creating Stunning Photographs of Cities at Dawn

30 Jan

We’ve all seen hundreds of gorgeous photos of sunrises over beaches and beautiful landscapes. Of course they have the capacity to wow and inspire, but I would argue that it’s far more interesting to photographs cities at dawn. You have so much more to work with – buildings, graffiti, debris, rivers, glass, the odd person, roads, and greenery in the midst of all of this urban-ness. The possibilities to create unique photos are endless. So, if you combine all this intense city landscape with the wonderful and quickly-changing light of dawn, you have an amazing combination.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 1

I’ve been shooting cities at dawn for over a decade now. For me cities are at their most inspiring when they are empty of people, traffic, and chaos and bathed in the beautiful light of dawn.

Here are 11 tips on how to create stunning photographs of cities at dawn:

1. Sunrise

Sunrise, especially when it’s an epic one, is obviously the focus for any early morning shoot. But it shouldn’t be just about capturing the sunrise.

  • Clouds: To me what is special about any given morning is what kind of clouds are in the sky. Clouds are what make mornings different from day to day and are one of the reasons to keep going back to the same place again and again.
  • Other elements: Think about other elements you can use to enhance the photo. Try framing the sunrise, and the sky, to create an interesting contrast (see photo above).
  • Foreground: Find an interesting subject for your foreground, using the sunrise like a tapestry.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 2

2. Emptiness

Being in a city (which is usually densely packed with people) suddenly deserted, creates a feeling that you are in a different world. You see the city as it really is, and it changes what you see but also what you photograph.

This sense of emptiness is made especially impactful when you photograph:

  • Tourist attractions
  • Roads
  • Monuments
  • Public squares

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 3

3. Varying types of light

The sunrise may be the shining moment of the morning, but don’t forget other unique qualities to early morning photography.

  • Blue hour: Is a very short time between night and sunrise, when the sky changes quickly from dark to light. It happens again before sunset, but at dawn the beauty of the blue hour is enhanced by the emptiness and stillness of the city. When you are shooting during the blue hour, be prepared as the light changes very quickly. Get your camera set up on a tripod and have your scene already composed, so that when it arrives and the light is changing, you won’t miss it. If you have a shot you really like, be patient, and shoot slowly as the light changes. Slowing down like this also creates the opportunity to relax enjoy the view and look around for the next shot.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 4

  • Artificial and natural light: Contrasting artificial and natural light. There is a very short time at dawn when you have both, and the effect is beautiful.
  • Low sun, long shadows: At dawn the sun rises from below the horizon and moves up into the sky at a height dependent on the time of year (and what part of the world you are in). The effect of a low sun is that it creates long shadows, which are stunningly effective with the low light of dawn. Stick around for a few hours after sunrise to capture the light falling over the streets and buildings like this:

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 5

4. Look for light sources

A bundle of different elements like buildings, roads, glass, and windows with the light falling onto them creates a myriad of opportunities for light to bounce, reflect, bend and distort. If you see light falling onto a wall, or reflecting onto a piece of glass, look for its source. It could be that the source is more interesting than the effect the light is creating.

  • Reflections: Are a gem to photograph and dawn is such a brilliant time because there aren’t people crowding around disturbing them. Search out water as it’s usually still – puddles, canals, ponds and my favourite – glass buildings.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 6

  • Light effects: The low sun creates a myriad of effects as it filters through trees, buildings and other city architecture. Look at this man, locking up, and how the shadows enhance the mood and meaning of the photo.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 7

  • Use the light for contrast: Search out the unusual. I love the contrast of some of the rougher, decaying edges of a city with the vibrant light of dawn.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 8

5. Seek out people – they are usually doing interesting things at dawn

Most people out at dawn are either working or they’ve been out all night enjoying themselves. They make interesting, and often very willing subjects!

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 9

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 10

6. Return to your favourite spots

No two sunrises are the same. So, if you have a favourite spot, go back and photograph it on a different day, during different seasons. The quality of the light will be different, perhaps there will be changes in the cityscape (London is never the same year to year), you will notice contrasts. Give yourself a challenge, ask yourself: How can I make this same scene a distinctive photograph? What else can I do? Push yourself to create more unique photographs every day.

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 11

Anthonyepesphotography DPS 12

7. Explore

Go off the beaten track. Photographing the iconic sites is amazing in any city (it’s iconic for a reason, right?) and having St. Mark’s Square in Venice to yourself at dawn is a heady experience. But there are always so many areas of any city that are not so frequently photographed. It could be the docklands in London’s East End, the rough and run down area east of Paris’s Sacre Coeur or the eastern edge of Venice, where I found abandoned buildings and ancient fortresses. Everything seems other-worldly at dawn and worth exploring.

8. Look behind you (and above, below, around and everywhere)

When you are going out to shoot, it’s important to really look around you. Doesn’t this sound like a simple task that we spend all of our lives doing? Actually no! You will be surprised by how much we all miss as we rush around in the little bubble of our minds, distracted by our thoughts and our tasks for the day.

Don McCullin says it brilliantly: “You can feast your eyes on a daily basis, although I suspect the average man on the street goes through life with narrowed vision, not seeing the whole scope of what’s going on around him.”

If you want to create images with a WOW factor you have to pay attention to what’s around you. What the photo world calls, “The art of seeing”.

I find being out at dawn helps me see, because there isn’t the usual distractions, our senses are more heightened, it’s an unusual time of day to be awake (for most of us) and we are seeing our familiar streets and places in a new light.

9. Get started early

I like to have found my location before I go out. From there I wander, but it’s good to have a initial place so you don’t waste time. I like to be in this first location at least an hour, sometimes an hour and half, before sunrise. There are some incredible opportunities to photograph the blue hour.

10. Be prepared with your kit

The light changes very quickly at dawn, and you definitely don’t want to miss that spectacular sunrise. My essential kit list for dawn shooting includes:

  • A small torch (flashlight) for setting up your camera in the dark
  • A plastic bag for my camera in case it rains (cheap but it works!)
  • A visor or hat as walking into the sunlight is hard on the eyes
  • Gloves (it’s often cold at dawn, even in summer)
  • A light, but sturdy tripod, (you’ll need this for the first couple of hours, but then you’ll be carrying it, hence it should be light)

11. Get yourself acquainted with your camera

This may seem a bit obvious but it is something most people don’t do; know your camera. Lack of camera knowledge can turn a simple shoot into a difficult one (especially in the dark)! Know what all those buttons do, some may make your life easier.

Does that give you some ideas for photographing your city at dawn? Or perhaps getting up early on the next trip? Share your comments below please.

BIO
Photographer Anthony Epes is currently publishing a series of photo books on Cities at Dawn, with instalments on London, Paris, Venice, New York and Istanbul. Inspired by his books Anthony runs photo workshops at dawn in some of the world’s most interesting and beautiful cities. His work has been featured on BBC World, French Photo Magazine, The Economist, Hyperallergic and CNN. He blogs about photography on his website.

SOCIAL MEDIA
• https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AnthonyEpes/posts

Twitter
• https://www.facebook.com/londonatdawn
• https://www.flickr.com/people/anthonyepes/
• https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthonyepes

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The post 11 Tips for Creating Stunning Photographs of Cities at Dawn by Anthony Epes appeared first on Digital Photography School.


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Little, Improved: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 review posted

30 Jan

The Panasonic Lumix GM5 is an almost unthinkably small Micro Four Thirds camera with a 16MP sensor, 3″ 921k-dot touch screen, 1080/60p HD video and built-in Wi-Fi. It follows in the already tiny footsteps of the GM1, adding a built-in EVF and more external controls to that camera’s point-and-shoot approach. Does it stand tall in a competitive enthusiast mirrorless class? Read more

Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

 
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